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View Full Version : Radar without tears...of course if the tears fall, you could image them.



trinitree88
2017-Jul-12, 07:11 PM
Radar as a technology, simplified for the rookies in the forum. We were all rookies once. SEE:https://arxiv.org/abs/1707.03357 :doh:

geonuc
2017-Jul-12, 09:50 PM
As an electronics technician in the US Navy, I found the physics and application of radar fascinating. I mean, who would think that waveguides could be a thing?

Hornblower
2017-Jul-12, 10:13 PM
My father worked on radar in its adolescence during World War II. He was a college freshman in radio and electronics engineering when the Army drafted him in the summer of 1942. When they found out what he could do, they sent him to special courses which were being taught at Harvard and MIT. Much of this was at the graduate level. He spent the final year of the European war at an air base in Italy as officer in charge of a team that maintained the radar sets in B-17s that were flying air strikes on Germany.

BigDon
2017-Jul-15, 03:13 PM
As an electronics technician in the US Navy, I found the physics and application of radar fascinating. I mean, who would think that waveguides could be a thing?

I'm with you there Geo. When I was in A school in Memphis I past by all three years of high school electronics in the first week.

And worked on aircraft fire control radars powerful enough to kill a man at a half a mile. (The AWG-9)

publiusr
2017-Jul-15, 04:09 PM
I wonder just how powerful a radar can be. I imagine the B-1 could carry something even more powerful--as a maser perhaps for a B-1R missile truck.

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Jul-15, 07:27 PM
My father worked on radar in its adolescence during World War II. He was a college freshman in radio and electronics engineering when the Army drafted him in the summer of 1942. When they found out what he could do, they sent him to special courses which were being taught at Harvard and MIT. Much of this was at the graduate level. He spent the final year of the European war at an air base in Italy as officer in charge of a team that maintained the radar sets in B-17s that were flying air strikes on Germany.

If you go here: http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/NHC/NewPDFs/USN/ you can find some of the RADAR BULLETIN issues that he trained with the troops with.

DaveC426913
2017-Jul-15, 09:13 PM
Good read.

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Jul-15, 09:58 PM
Good read.

If you go up to /hyperwar directory you're on the door to ~200 terabytes of files on WWII. We've been working on that site since 1992.

grapes
2017-Jul-15, 10:23 PM
Radar as a technology, simplified for the rookies in the forum. We were all rookies once. SEE:https://arxiv.org/abs/1707.03357 :doh:

Only eleven pages!

DaveC426913
2017-Jul-16, 06:53 PM
If you go up to /hyperwar directory you're on the door to ~200 terabytes of files on WWII. We've been working on that site since 1992.

Er. I was referring to the OP. Less than 200Tb.;)