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Silent Knight
2005-Feb-28, 05:49 AM
I received a letter from someone in Australia and egads it looks almost arabic! Do all you Aussies write like this? My mom said it reminds her of how the founding fathers wrote. Is it common to write esq. on a letter? What is the dovecote?

Candy
2005-Feb-28, 05:54 AM
Well, you've seen how mickal555 types. :wink:

Candy
2005-Feb-28, 05:58 AM
Esquire (http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=esquire)

Main Entry: es•quire
Pronunciation: 'es-"kwIr, is-'
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French escuier squire, from Late Latin scutarius, from Latin scutum shield; akin to Old Irish sciath shield
1 : a member of the English gentry ranking below a knight
2 : a candidate for knighthood serving as shield bearer and attendant to a knight
3 -- used as a title of courtesy usually placed in its abbreviated form after the surname <John R. Smith, Esq.>
4 archaic : a landed proprietor
I’m an esquire. 8)

paulie jay
2005-Feb-28, 06:24 AM
"Esquire" is not in common usage down here.
In Australia we speak English and write in English. It just seems to me that your letter writer suffers from a bad case or bad hand writing.


Just the other day I was checking out an American traveller (I work part tme for Customs) and I asked her if she was carrying any cigarettes. She said "no". Upon xray there proved to be eight cartons of cigarettes in her suitcase, to which she said "Oh, I didn't think you meant MY cigarettes..."
"Just who's cigarettes did you think I was talking about?" I asked as I charged her $400.

Are all Americans this stupid?
















Of course they aren't. Are they?

Candy
2005-Feb-28, 06:34 AM
Are all Americans this stupid?
Only when traveling. :lol:

Candy
2005-Feb-28, 06:36 AM
(I work part time for Customs)...
Have you ever had to body search someone? 8-[

paulie jay
2005-Feb-28, 06:38 AM
Only girls can touch girls... =;

Candy
2005-Feb-28, 06:44 AM
Dovecote (http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=dovecote)

Main Entry: dove•cote
Pronunciation: 'd&v-"kOt, -"kät
Variant(s): also dove•cot /-"kät/
Function: noun
1 : a small compartmented raised house or box for domestic pigeons
2 : a settled or harmonious group or organization
Now, I am curious as to the contents of the letter.

Silent Knight, is this a penpal? When I had penpals in foreign countries, I would try to write in terms I thought the other person could understand. Since our slang is so different.

paulie jay
2005-Feb-28, 06:51 AM
I think the letter writer may have fallen into that irritating Australian habit of deliberately peppering their conversation with incomprehensible truns of phrase. "S'a beaut day s'long as the mozzies don't do you like a dinner. Bazza and Gazza were gonna come and have a butchers at ya great plates of meat, but they shot through like a Bondi tram. Strewth."
It drives me crazy to hear normal speaking Austalians sudden start sprouting this gibberish as soon as they get within earshot of a foreigner. They do it deliberately you know...

mickal555
2005-Feb-28, 07:03 AM
Well, you've seen how mickal555 types. :wink:
Oi!


I think the letter writer may have fallen into that irritating Australian habit of deliberately peppering their conversation with incomprehensible truns of phrase. "S'a beaut day s'long as the mozzies don't do you like a dinner. Bazza and Gazza were gonna come and have a butchers at ya great plates of meat, but they shot through like a Bondi tram. Strewth." It drives me crazy to hear normal speaking Austalians sudden start sprouting this gibberish as soon as they get within earshot of a foreigner. They do it deliberately you know...
Yeah, no one really talks like that- we just do it for fun :P .
On a more serious note, if anyone comes downunder remember to watch out for drop bears.

lti
2005-Feb-28, 07:06 AM
speaking of aussie slang, does anyone know what they mean by refering to someone as a hornbag? Kath, of Kath and Kim refers to herself as a hornbag and i was wonddering if this is the equivelent of the kiwi 'skank' or if it has less negative conotations.

mickal555
2005-Feb-28, 07:15 AM
Totally awesome looking (sex machine) person, someone you lust over , normally refers to a female

Obviousman
2005-Feb-28, 09:30 AM
The only people who would put 'esquire' (esq.) after their name are those that have some real social identity problems.

No offence to your friend, but really....

Lurker
2005-Feb-28, 06:00 PM
Are all Americans this stupid?

HEY!! That's not stupidity... that's arrogance!! PLEASE not the difference!! [-(

:wink:

Nicolas
2005-Feb-28, 06:38 PM
I don't think there are many Dutch speaking Belgians who don't know what a dovecote is! (you stole that word from us!! :wink: )

Silent Knight
2005-Feb-28, 07:20 PM
The letter came from someone in the archives at a grammar school. The words are fine, it is just the handwriting style. With the help of my mom, we were able to figure out the gist of the letter. There were still about 5 words I couldn't read. I found it interesting that he wrote out "United States of America." His ESQ looks like EIJ. His capital M's sort of look like fancy sevens. He wrote "Mr" inside of the letter but it looks like a fancy seven and an upside down semi colon. His word "initials" is really weird, it just looks like some lines and dots. He wrote 1985 and the nine looks like a left-leaning y. The information is on genealogy. There is a famous dead computer programmer and I'm trying to find out if I'm related.

paulie jay
2005-Mar-01, 02:00 AM
Maybe he's going to be a doctor and is practising the "doctor scrawl" that I always hear chemists complaining about?!

As Mickal says, "hornbag" is a complimentary term, used in reference to any person good looking enough to turn you on. (Or "give you the horn" as it is sometimes said.)

EvilBob
2005-Mar-01, 03:40 AM
It drives me crazy to hear normal speaking Austalians sudden start sprouting this gibberish as soon as they get within earshot of a foreigner. They do it deliberately you know...

We do. And I'm convinced that people from the southern US don't really do that long 'y'aaaaaaaaaaalllllllllll' drawl when no-one else is listening.

:D

kylenano
2005-Mar-01, 07:15 AM
The UK press uses Aussie cliches...even in an article that says the editor of The Times is antipodean (Australian according to Google):

Hire me kangaroo now, sport (http://news.independent.co.uk/media/story.jsp?story=615334)
(This list includes kiwis)

Candy
2005-Mar-01, 07:46 AM
The letter came from someone in the archives at a grammar school. The words are fine, it is just the handwriting style. With the help of my mom, we were able to figure out the gist of the letter. There were still about 5 words I couldn't read. I found it interesting that he wrote out "United States of America." His ESQ looks like EIJ. His capital M's sort of look like fancy sevens. He wrote "Mr" inside of the letter but it looks like a fancy seven and an upside down semi colon. His word "initials" is really weird, it just looks like some lines and dots. He wrote 1985 and the nine looks like a left-leaning y. The information is on genealogy. There is a famous dead computer programmer and I'm trying to find out if I'm related.
So is this a copy of the letter the famous dead computer programmer guy wrote in 1985? Just wondering. 8-[

Silent Knight
2005-Mar-01, 05:00 PM
So is this a copy of the letter the famous dead computer programmer guy wrote in 1985? Just wondering. 8-[

No, it is from the keeper of the archives and I would guess he is in his 60s or 70s. He gave me an obituary and included a letter talking about it.

Doodler
2005-Mar-01, 08:27 PM
It drives me crazy to hear normal speaking Austalians sudden start sprouting this gibberish as soon as they get within earshot of a foreigner. They do it deliberately you know...

We do. And I'm convinced that people from the southern US don't really do that long 'y'aaaaaaaaaaalllllllllll' drawl when no-one else is listening.

:D

Don't you believe it. Part of the reason single words become sentences stems from the fact that they drawl so slowly they've adapted the English language to transmit much more information per syllable than the rest of us.

Example: Sensuous. Application: Sensuous up, grab me a beer!*

*stolen wholeheartedly from Jeff Foxworthy :)

darkhunter
2005-Mar-01, 09:50 PM
It drives me crazy to hear normal speaking Austalians sudden start sprouting this gibberish as soon as they get within earshot of a foreigner. They do it deliberately you know...

We do. And I'm convinced that people from the southern US don't really do that long 'y'aaaaaaaaaaalllllllllll' drawl when no-one else is listening.

:D Hey, ya'll--I do! :D

I cuyrrenty am in England and have notice how thick the accent some people use gets when they find out i'm American. So if course, I quit enunciating and talk the way I growed up talkin'....ya'll....

Edit: Also, when I'm reading for more than a couple of sentences, i tend to revert to talking Texan...sometimes not good while reading with my young'uns (i.e. if I don't watch it, creatures turn into critters.... :D )