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brianok
2017-Jul-27, 12:09 PM
What do you think---natural formations or man made?






http://www.news.com.au/technology/science/archaeology/mysterious-sphere-unearthed-in-forest-believed-to-be-part-of-ancient-civilisation/news-story/d56b3f71cdb304f247986d24f1b49098

profloater
2017-Jul-27, 12:37 PM
My vote goes to natural geology but it would be nice to have one in the garden. If we found one still in its bowling bag I might have to change my mind.

Spacedude
2017-Jul-27, 01:34 PM
Looks like it has layers of material on it's surface. Giant pearls made by giant prehistoric oysters? Shellfish humor...

mkline55
2017-Jul-27, 01:45 PM
How big would a trebuchet have to be to launch one of those?

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Jul-27, 02:02 PM
Looks like it has layers of material on it's surface. Giant pearls made by giant prehistoric oysters? Shellfish humor...

Could be an accretion layer flaking off?

The article mentioned the spheres in Costa Rica, Olmec relics according to a theory I heard. Anything new on those?

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Jul-27, 02:03 PM
How big would a trebuchet have to be to launch one of those?

Big enough to throw it? /silly

Such a trebuchet would have to be built from metal, I think. I'd love to watch the first test ... on Youtube.

John Mendenhall
2017-Jul-27, 03:36 PM
It looks like a meteorite to me.

PetersCreek
2017-Jul-27, 04:36 PM
Could be similar to the naturally formed "cannon ball" rocks found on some beaches in New Zealand.

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Jul-27, 05:07 PM
It looks like a meteorite to me.

A meteorite that large would have made one heck of an impact if it was that size when it hit.

schlaugh
2017-Jul-27, 07:08 PM
Almost certainly a concretion, albeit a big one, opines a paleontologist and science writer for *Forbes magazine (https://www.forbes.com/sites/shaenamontanari/2016/04/18/that-massive-stone-sphere-in-bosnia-is-probably-not-from-a-lost-civilization/#160c878c174e):


There are many examples of spherical concretions like the one found in Bosnia from around the world. The Moeraki Boulders of New Zealand are an example of “cannonball concretions”. These famous, very spherical boulders are found on a beach in Otago. They are part of a Paleocene-aged rock formation, so they date back 60 million years and likely took millions of years to grow to their most massive sizes of up to 7 feet wide. Other examples of almost impossibly round cannonball concretions occur in Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota, and these ones are also quite reddish and iron-stained due to their mineral composition.

*The Forbes link has a lot of popups.

Squink
2017-Jul-27, 09:51 PM
Images of giant concretions (https://www.google.com/search?q=giant+concretions&num=20&safe=off&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj91NvRt6rVAhUGej4KHWr3CdcQsAQIMg&biw=1300&bih=728).

Trebuchet
2017-Jul-27, 11:52 PM
Images of giant concretions (https://www.google.com/search?q=giant+concretions&num=20&safe=off&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj91NvRt6rVAhUGej4KHWr3CdcQsAQIMg&biw=1300&bih=728).

Including the one in the OP. And a fossil or three, including an enormous ammonite.

John Mendenhall
2017-Jul-28, 12:58 AM
Images of giant concretions (https://www.google.com/search?q=giant+concretions&num=20&safe=off&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj91NvRt6rVAhUGej4KHWr3CdcQsAQIMg&biw=1300&bih=728).

The link is terrific. Thanks !

John Mendenhall
2017-Jul-28, 01:05 AM
It looks like a meteorite to me.

OK, so it's not a meteorite. Maybe it's an ammonite ? :doh:

publiusr
2017-Jul-28, 08:37 PM
Maybe an erratic that rolled along time ago--rounded by water action?

eburacum45
2017-Dec-08, 02:53 PM
Semir Osmanagić, known as the 'Bosnian Indiana Jones', is a well-known pseudoarchaeologist who previously found the Bosnian Pyramids (that turned out to be natural formations). Same with these balls.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semir_Osmanagi%C4%87

Ross 54
2017-Dec-08, 10:46 PM
The article mentions the sedimentary nature of the sphere, and one see areas where a couple of the thin layers have fallen away. Concretion is a very reasonable seeming explanation, especially since these sorts of spheres found throughout the world. If the sphere were carved from a uniform piece of stone, these layers should not be apparent.

DaveC426913
2017-Dec-09, 05:18 AM
Semir Osmanagić, known as the 'Bosnian Indiana Jones', is a well-known pseudoarchaeologist who previously found the Bosnian Pyramids (that turned out to be natural formations). Same with these balls.

In this case his proof is in his pudding. The balls are pretty real, and interesting in their own right.

eburacum45
2017-Dec-09, 11:14 AM
But they are natural, not artificial.

DaveC426913
2017-Dec-10, 06:25 AM
But they are natural, not artificial.

Is this in answer to my post? If so:

1] It's not yet certain they are natural, though is the most plausible explanation.
2] They're still interesting, each if he's a bit of a sensationalist.

Shaula
2017-Dec-10, 10:21 AM
2] They're still interesting, each if he's a bit of a sensationalist.
Bit of a sensationalist? Read the theories he promotes. His belief that they are not natural is a good argument that they are. If he told me the Earth was a sphere I'd probably start constructing a home made rocket to fire myself into the stratosphere to check.

BigDon
2018-Jan-21, 07:12 PM
Could be an accretion layer flaking off?

The article mentioned the spheres in Costa Rica, Olmec relics according to a theory I heard. Anything new on those?

Hey Chief, I know you don't come back anymore, but if you're still out there...

Under documentary conditions it's been proven that humans have a remarkable knack for carving spherical objects free hand with great precision using only very simple tools.

We just, for the most part, don't do it often enough to recognize this fact.

After the film-maker had the first set of stone spheres made with local help, he wanted to know if this was a local innate talent and then employed a passing bus load of tourists to do the same thing.

Yep, the tourists did just as well as the locals. When allowed to use a *string* instead of just their arms as a compass, everybody got to under a quarter inch out of round over four and five foot spheres.

Yay humans!

DonM435
2018-Jan-25, 10:28 PM
Kidney stone from a sauropod.