PDA

View Full Version : Antartica and Greenland melt



Tom Mazanec
2017-Sep-06, 04:00 PM
Imagine all the ice on Greenland and Antartica melts. How small would they become, factoring that sea level would rise and much of them is already below present sea level?

Noclevername
2017-Sep-06, 05:09 PM
Not sure. But I know there would be rebound upward as well, after the weight of all that ice is removed.

Tom Mazanec
2017-Sep-06, 05:49 PM
Not sure. But I know there would be rebound upward as well, after the weight of all that ice is removed.

Hmmmm...maybe thermal expansion of the ocean water (it would take quite a bit of global warming to accomplish this) would compensate for that?

Spacedude
2017-Sep-06, 09:06 PM
Both male and female names have been used since the late 1970s, so more like "several decades ago" than "several years".

The past few decades seems like years ago.....;-)

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Sep-06, 11:33 PM
Imagine all the ice on Greenland and Antartica melts. How small would they become, factoring that sea level would rise and much of them is already below present sea level?

From this map (https://nsidc.org/greenland-today/files/2015/06/GreenlandMap2.png) it doesn't appear Greenland would lose anything.

Antarctica:

https://atlantisbloggen.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/meltantartica.jpg22617

Tom Mazanec
2017-Sep-07, 01:23 AM
Wow, it looks like Antarctica might end up smaller than Australia!

Tom Mazanec
2017-Sep-07, 01:24 AM
The past few decades seems like years ago.....;-)


I think this post is on the wrong thread...

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Sep-07, 12:02 PM
Wow, it looks like Antarctica might end up smaller than Australia!

That's without sea level rise.

Spacedude
2017-Sep-07, 02:38 PM
I think this post is on the wrong thread...

You think right, it was supposed to be on the Irma thread, I got lost in the storm of catch-up posting.

Squink
2017-Sep-08, 02:13 PM
Pirates of the Antarctic Archipelago?

BigDon
2017-Sep-08, 11:26 PM
Even more important.

The Isthmus of Panama gets breached in three places. One breach will be thirty-five miles wide. The other two breaches were fifteen and seven miles wide, I believe. This will restart the Great Equatorial Current which had been stifled by Panama being pushed up out of the sea. Once that happens we won't need carbon dioxide to maintain warm global temps. Even if CO2 were dropped to below preindustrial levels. The up coming warm period should last as least as long as that current remains open.

So until Panama rises higher or South America moves further north.

I can hardly wait.

Tom Mazanec
2017-Sep-09, 08:01 PM
Even more important.

The Isthmus of Panama gets breached in three places. One breach will be thirty-five miles wide. The other two breaches were fifteen and seven miles wide, I believe. This will restart the Great Equatorial Current which had been stifled by Panama being pushed up out of the sea. Once that happens we won't need carbon dioxide to maintain warm global temps. Even if CO2 were dropped to below preindustrial levels. The up coming warm period should last as least as long as that current remains open.

So until Panama rises higher or South America moves further north.

I can hardly wait.

So the Wurm may be the last glaciation of the Pleistocene Ice Age?

Eclogite
2017-Sep-10, 01:26 AM
From this map (https://nsidc.org/greenland-today/files/2015/06/GreenlandMap2.png) it doesn't appear Greenland would lose anything.

Antarctica:

https://atlantisbloggen.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/meltantartica.jpg22617What am I missing? The map has two contours. The solid line, which enfolds the land (green area) and a blue line that seems to follow the current outline of Antarctica. However both are identified as being the 1000m contour. Since no one is expecting a 1000m rise in sea level and we have two conflicting contours assigned the same height you'll understand I am not placing much credence in the map.

Note: I could buy the 100m contour, but I still wouldn't trust a cartographer that messed up so badly.

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Sep-10, 05:36 PM
Even more important.

The Isthmus of Panama gets breached in three places. One breach will be thirty-five miles wide. The other two breaches were fifteen and seven miles wide, I believe. This will restart the Great Equatorial Current which had been stifled by Panama being pushed up out of the sea. Once that happens we won't need carbon dioxide to maintain warm global temps. Even if CO2 were dropped to below preindustrial levels. The up coming warm period should last as least as long as that current remains open.

So until Panama rises higher or South America moves further north.

I can hardly wait.

And if you look at a map you'll notice that most of Europe is level with Canada. Without the Gulf Stream they'd have the same weather, pretty much. (I looked it up once, the closest European capital to the Indianapolis latitude was Rome.)

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Sep-10, 05:38 PM
What am I missing? The map has two contours. The solid line, which enfolds the land (green area) and a blue line that seems to follow the current outline of Antarctica. However both are identified as being the 1000m contour. Since no one is expecting a 1000m rise in sea level and we have two conflicting contours assigned the same height you'll understand I am not placing much credence in the map.

Note: I could buy the 100m contour, but I still wouldn't trust a cartographer that messed up so badly.

I wasn't too concerned with the level of the oceans, as I commented, but rather what would be above sea level as it is right now if there was no ice cap.

Tom Mazanec
2017-Sep-11, 01:16 AM
Here is a view of a superwarm future Earth:
http://www.worlddreambank.org/D/DUBIA.HTM
I had mentioned this on another thread, but had forgotten.

grant hutchison
2017-Sep-12, 12:32 AM
From this map (https://nsidc.org/greenland-today/files/2015/06/GreenlandMap2.png) it doesn't appear Greenland would lose anything.That doesn't seem likely, given that a large area of Greenland's central bedrock is below current sea level (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Topographic_map_of_Greenland_bedrock.jpg). That's going to fill with fresh water until it drains, unless it's inundated by sea level rise.

Grant Hutchison

Noisy Rhysling
2017-Sep-12, 12:52 AM
That doesn't seem likely, given that a large area of Greenland's central bedrock is below current sea level (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Topographic_map_of_Greenland_bedrock.jpg). That's going to fill with fresh water until it drains, unless it's inundated by sea level rise.

Grant Hutchison

Ya swooshed me. Again.

grant hutchison
2017-Sep-12, 02:29 AM
Ya swooshed me. Again.I don't know what swooshed means, in this context.

Grant Hutchison

Ara Pacis
2017-Nov-20, 04:05 AM
What am I missing? The map has two contours. The solid line, which enfolds the land (green area) and a blue line that seems to follow the current outline of Antarctica. However both are identified as being the 1000m contour. Since no one is expecting a 1000m rise in sea level and we have two conflicting contours assigned the same height you'll understand I am not placing much credence in the map.

Note: I could buy the 100m contour, but I still wouldn't trust a cartographer that messed up so badly.

If you look close, there appears to be a minus or negative sign in front of the 1000 for the blue contour. It looks blue and like it is an extension of the blue contour line that is used in the legend, but the position of the word "contour" is placed below it, indicating that short dash is part of the text. As for what it means, I'd guess it refers to the Grounding Line, where the ice shelves are thick and heavy enough to touch bottom instead of floating.

Don, another current might start up between the Atlantic and the Indian Ocean through the Mediterranean and Red seas. I think the Caspian will link to the Black, then the Med. Flooding in the northern plains and river valleys by the arctic is hard to see on some of the map apps I've looked at, but there might be some interesting linkages there. Of course, adept humans might be able to block some of these openings and flows, depending on the state of technology with whomever survives to that point in the future.