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ToSeek
2005-Mar-03, 06:53 PM
Jupiter-Sized Star Found (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/jupiter_sized_star.html?332005)


Astronomers have found a core burning star, like our own Sun, that's only 16% larger than Jupiter; although, it has 96 times as much mass. The observations were made using the European Southern Observatory's 8.2m VLT Kueyen telescope in Chile. Astronomers watched tracked 60 stars which were known to have a regular dip in brightness, when a dimmer object was passing in front. This survey found 7 of these low mass stars which eclipsed their brighter companion.

Captain Kidd
2005-Mar-03, 07:00 PM
Man, they used a lot of Obelisks on that one.

01101001
2005-Mar-03, 07:01 PM
Jupiter-Sized Star Found (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/jupiter_sized_star.html?332005)


Not less striking is the fact that exoplanets which are orbiting very close to their host star, the so-called "hot Jupiters", have radii which may be larger than the newly found star. The radius of exoplanet HD209458b, for example, is about 30% larger than that of Jupiter. It is thus substantially larger than OGLE-TR-122b!

Imagine such a tiny star orbited by a larger-diameter planet. I wonder if it happens.

Russ
2005-Mar-03, 08:55 PM
Jupiter-Sized Star Found (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/jupiter_sized_star.html?332005)


Not less striking is the fact that exoplanets which are orbiting very close to their host star, the so-called "hot Jupiters", have radii which may be larger than the newly found star. The radius of exoplanet HD209458b, for example, is about 30% larger than that of Jupiter. It is thus substantially larger than OGLE-TR-122b!

Imagine such a tiny star orbited by a larger-diameter planet. I wonder if it happens.

Given the size of the statistical sample, my bet is; If you can think of it, there is probably at least one out there. 8) :lol:

CJSF
2005-Mar-03, 09:49 PM
Man, they used a lot of Obelisks on that one.

Did you mean monoliths?

CJSF

Maddad
2005-Mar-04, 01:14 AM
Jupiter's mass is 2 x 10^27 kg. Since this star is 96 times as massive, it masses about 2 x 10^29 kg. The Sun masses 2 x 10^30 kg, or about ten times as much as this star. This is right at the theoretical edge of how massive a star can be to sustain core fusion.

Captain Kidd
2005-Mar-04, 02:19 AM
Man, they used a lot of Obelisks on that one.

Did you mean monoliths?

CJSFErr, yeah, what you said. 8-[
I knew something felt wrong about that but I couldn't put my finger on it.

Majin Vegeta
2005-Mar-04, 06:50 PM
=D> Bravo! But I thought there were earth sized stars out there... Is there or am I really not smart?

Hamlet
2005-Mar-04, 06:59 PM
=D> Bravo! But I thought there were earth sized stars out there... Is there or am I really not smart?

You may be thinking about White Dwarfs that are the remains of dead stars. They have radii on the order of Earth's, but they are no longer producing energy via fusion and are cooling off.

JHotz
2005-Mar-08, 06:45 AM
Jupiter's mass is 2 x 10^27 kg. Since this star is 96 times as massive, it masses about 2 x 10^29 kg. The Sun masses 2 x 10^30 kg, or about ten times as much as this star. This is right at the theoretical edge of how massive a star can be to sustain core fusion.

In the book Hidden Empire the Humans teleport some kind of superdense body, (I forget what), into the center of a gas giant and turn it into a sun.