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View Full Version : Do blackholes/event horizons length contract?



WaxRubiks
2017-Oct-27, 01:48 PM
If you were approaching(near miss) a black hole at close to the speed of light, would its shape length contract, ie would the event horizon become a more flattened ball?

profloater
2017-Oct-27, 01:56 PM
i think you only have to do the thought experiment which inspired special relativity. Light from further away is travelling behind light from closer to you, so it arrives later but by that later time you are much closer because you are so fast, so the distant emitter seems closer than if you were still. Contraction apparent.
I suppose you cannot see the backside of a black hole but the front and sides are emitting toward you.

A320
2018-Apr-22, 04:01 AM
Hi, I`m new. In view of all the stuff that is going into the black hole is compressed that the centre of a black hole is iron and probably damned hot. If time exists then the fact that time cannot escape a black hole does that mean that there is no time therefore nothing must move for there is no time like the present, past or future there is no beginning point middle bit and end point. This would therefore suggest that nothing is happening in a black hole as everything on strike due to no time.
As it was the result of a dying sun, except they dont actually die but become blackholes like the one in most galaxies.
Looking from a geophysical view point one could assume that as masses of . .mass comes crashing in from orbit on a regular basis then in ever increasing mas and gravity inevitably implodes under its own weight, would this be considered a big bang when this actually happens and that anyone in the neighbourhood may well feel the effects of it and we essentially become a universe of itself for any measurable distances - within the current universe, just a mass more stuff in a relatively empty universe.

Was time invented or discovered? It started by some guy sticking a stick in the sand and noting how the stick moves as the sun passed over and the rest we know - clocks. So, had we just invented time or newly discovered time. If it was the former, then time does not exist.

Can I disagree with your back of the black whole as if it is the result of the collapsing star in its many stages then as the star was predominantly round then surely the blackholes are the same so that if we had the time and money we could circumnavigate a blackhole

Man is addicted to everything has a beginning and an end if he were to ponder the possibility of forever and ever amen always will be and ever shall be, etc., then entropy is not such a strong argument and that the laws of thermodynamics have not taken into consideration the birth of new stars and solar system and galaxies, all over again.

PetersCreek
2018-Apr-23, 08:14 PM
Welcome to the CosmoQuest forums, A320. If you haven't already done so, please read our rules, linked in my signature line below. We certainly welcome members to ask questions. However, some of your statements are of concern since they appear to be contrary to mainstream theories. Rule 13 is worth noting in that regard and you may want to read the ATM Theory Advice also linked below.

grant hutchison
2018-Apr-23, 08:54 PM
Length contraction occurs in Special Relativity because of the particular simultaneity convention we can use in flat space. You can't apply that simultaneity convention in General Relativity, and in fact simultaneity turns out to be a difficult concept to even define in GR - it's a local phenomenon that you can't propagate globally. So length contraction is likewise something you can't observe globally.

Grant Hutchison

grant hutchison
2018-Apr-23, 08:58 PM
i think you only have to do the thought experiment which inspired special relativity. Light from further away is travelling behind light from closer to you, so it arrives later but by that later time you are much closer because you are so fast, so the distant emitter seems closer than if you were still. Contraction apparent.You seem to be describing the phenomenon of light aberration, which is a separate issue from the coordinate changes associated with special relativity.

Grant Hutchison