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View Full Version : If Yellowstone Park magma chamber blew, what would that do for longterm weather?



WaxRubiks
2017-Nov-15, 03:14 PM
There would be much ash in the atmosphere, blocking out the sun, and I just wondered how long a lot of it would remain in the atmosphere. And general light levels etc..

01101001
2017-Nov-15, 03:31 PM
If? Don't you mean when? And then in that distant time, what sort of weather do you expect it could affect? Will there be any air? Will weather still be a thing?

grant hutchison
2017-Nov-15, 04:23 PM
Tambora led to the Year Without A Summer in 1816. It had a Volcanic Explosivity Index of 7. A supervolcano at Yellowstone would have a VEI of 8, which is ten times the ejecta volume. You can find an illustrative discussion of the climatic effect of the Toba eruption (which was a VEI 8) here (http://www.andamans.org/toba-aftermath-climate-and-environment/). Yellowstone is farther from the equator, so would concentrate its effect more in the northern hemisphere.

Grant Hutchison

slang
2017-Nov-15, 10:12 PM
Thread moved from OTB

Squink
2017-Nov-17, 03:31 PM
I've not heard of Yellowstone ever being linked to any mass extinction events.

BigDon
2017-Nov-17, 07:58 PM
Just wait Squink.

Up until the mid ninties Yellowstone was in the middle of its 600 thousand year eruption cycle.

Main stream media takes a fancy to it and the timeline advances 300,000 years in a mere 15 years.

In five more years it's going to explode yesterday.

I'd be much more worried about the up coming Crisper derived eugenics plagues.

Solfe
2017-Nov-18, 12:12 AM
I live in NY. If Yellowstone blew, I'm very sure that I would want to be more east of it. But perhaps there isn't enough east to go east enough. :)

Trebuchet
2017-Nov-18, 02:07 AM
I live in NY. If Yellowstone blew, I'm very sure that I would want to be more east of it. But perhaps there isn't enough east to go east enough. :)
I'm to the west, so the prevailing winds would probably require the ash to go about 90% of the distance around the earth. That might not be far enough.

danscope
2017-Nov-18, 02:31 AM
We might be talkin' a lot of winter....across the hemisphere. Not exactly a local event.

WaxRubiks
2017-Nov-18, 08:41 AM
Also, it is just a magma chamber, so I have often wondered why it would blow up.....why wouldn't it just ooze out in a more gentle manner?

Ara Pacis
2017-Nov-18, 04:08 PM
Also, it is just a magma chamber, so I have often wondered why it would blow up.....why wouldn't it just ooze out in a more gentle manner?

Dissolved gasses under pressure, like champagne.

grant hutchison
2017-Nov-18, 04:46 PM
Mount St Helens had a magma chamber. Look how that turned out.

Grant Hutchison

BigDon
2017-Nov-18, 07:51 PM
If this gives anybody any information, brontotheres as far east as the Appalacians had bone damage from breathing volcanic ash from one of the eruptions. Bisonoids millennia later also show this damage. This is lethal, at least in animals. So everything east to the Appalachians becomes uninhabitable.

The name of this condition escapes me at the moment.

There are so many people in this area the patient count, (what close to 100 million people?) would make it untreatable as well.

grant hutchison
2017-Nov-18, 08:46 PM
If this gives anybody any information, brontotheres as far east as the Appalacians had bone damage from breathing volcanic ash from one of the eruptions. Bisonoids millennia later also show this damage. This is lethal, at least in animals. So everything east to the Appalachians becomes uninhabitable.

The name of this condition escapes me at the moment.Sounds like volcanic fluorosis. You get that mainly by eating and drinking stuff that's contaminated by fluoride-containing ash. Breathing ash causes lung damage similar to miner's silicosis. (The name pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis is sometimes used for the volcanic variant of this condition, but it's actually a joke word coined by a puzzle writer.)

Grant Hutchison

Squink
2017-Nov-21, 06:21 PM
Bruneau-Jarbidge caldera (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruneau-Jarbidge_caldera) (When it blew 11 million years ago)
Ashfall Fossil Beds (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashfall_Fossil_Beds) 1000 miles downwind.
The dust layer hit about 8 feet deep (http://ashfall.unl.edu/AshfallBrochure.pdf) there.