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selvaarchi
2017-Nov-16, 01:50 AM
In 79,000 years just discovered earth like plane,t Ross 128 b, will be closer to earth than Proxima b.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/space/deep-space/a13628613/second-closest-earth-like-planet-discovered/


First there was Proxima b, the Earth-sized planet orbiting the closest star to us, Proxima Centauri. Then came the seven Earth-sized worlds orbiting TRAPPIST-1, a star 39 light-years away, three of which are in the habitable zone. Now we welcome a new tantalizing exoplanet to the group, the second closest we know of, also Earth-sized and temperate, orbiting a calm red dwarf star: Ross 128 b.

Ross 128 is an old, inactive red dwarf star that sits 11 light-years away. Proxima Centauri is only 4.2 light-years away. However, Ross 128 is moving toward us, and it will become the closest star to the sun in just 79,000 years, towing the planet Ross 128 b along with it. Considering the oldest human remains are thought to be hundreds of thousands or even millions of years old, it's not crazy to think our species could still be roaming the Earth when Ross 128 b becomes the closest exoplanet to our home world.

selvaarchi
2017-Nov-16, 09:42 AM
An article in The Planetary Society on Planet Ross 128 b.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/2017/20171115-ross-128b.html


Meet the new neighbor: an Earth-sized exoplanet just 11 light-years away that could potentially harbor life.

European scientists announced today the discovery of a world orbiting nearby star Ross 128. The planet, named Ross 128 b, has a predicted temperature range that could allow liquid water to exist on the surface. Ross 128 b is now the second-closest such world to Earth; only Proxima Centauri b, at 4.25 light years away, is closer.

Xavier Bonfils, the lead author of the paper announcing the discovery in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, told me via email Ross 128 b has a mass about 1.35 times that of Earth.

"We are thus confident that Ross 128 b is a rocky planet," he said. Unlike Proxima Centauri, Ross 128 is said to be "quiet," meaning it spews out comparatively less radiation that could harm life as we know it.

George
2017-Nov-16, 06:48 PM
Using Wiki values (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ross_128), I get it will reach its closest point in 76,200 years. But its approach angle is fairly high at 32.3 deg. (Alpha Centauri is 8 deg.). It's closest point will be 5.9 lyrs, if my math is correct. Perhaps my math is in error, but it could be right.

George
2017-Nov-17, 09:33 PM
Here is a better version that is more accurate, I trust, than my prior post. Note that it will not be the closest planet to us as Proxima will be closer still even though its closest approach will be earllier.

22771

FrankWSchmidt
2017-Nov-21, 09:04 PM
Using Wiki values (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ross_128), I get it will reach its closest point in 76,200 years. But its approach angle is fairly high at 32.3 deg. (Alpha Centauri is 8 deg.). It's closest point will be 5.9 lyrs, if my math is correct. Perhaps my math is in error, but it could be right.

Wouldn't the Alpha Centauri angle be more like 45 degrees, as it will pass in about 3 light years distance, and will have moved about 3 light years perpendicular to that from today?

( Edit: Would it be closest distance = current distance * sin(angle) ? )

George
2017-Nov-21, 10:27 PM
Wouldn't the Alpha Centauri angle be more like 45 degrees, as it will pass in about 3 light years distance, and will have moved about 3 light years perpendicular to that from today? Oops, I see my mistake. I used only one component of the vector (mas) and not the true vector. The corrected approach angle is 47.75 deg., very close to your angle, ignoring that this will likely vary due to the wobbling effect of a triple star system. It will get within 3.23 light years of us in 27,673 years.

Ross 128 will therefore not be the closest system to us when it reaches its closest point to us in 50,259 years because it will still be 6.36 light years away even though it has a tighter approach angle (but its farther away to begin with). So either I'm wrong or the article is wrong. I suppose that eventually, Ross 128 will be the closest after some point in time, perhaps around 80,000 years.


( Edit: Would it be closest distance = current distance * sin(angle) ? ) Yes. Right triangle graphs are helpful. :)