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WaxRubiks
2017-Dec-23, 01:45 AM
if you had a computer memory chip that could store an infinite amount of information, could you store the amount of information on two of these chips, on one of these chips?

grant hutchison
2017-Dec-23, 02:03 AM
Hilbert's computer chip?
As physically impossible as Hilbert's Hotel, but by the same logic you can free up an infinite number of memory locations on the first chip simply by moving all the existing data to even-numbered locations, and then copying the new data into the odd-numbered locations. (You could, in fact, accommodate the data from an infinite number of infinite chips on a single chip.)

Grant Hutchison

KaiYeves
2017-Dec-23, 03:18 AM
if you had a computer memory chip that could store an infinite amount of information, could you store the amount of information on two of these chips, on one of these chips?

Double infinity is still infinity, at least if I remember all those magazine puzzles correctly.

DonM435
2017-Dec-23, 04:10 AM
With that much data, you should maintain a complete backup. I'd say that it was better to use two such chips, though I don't think that such is possible.

John Mendenhall
2017-Dec-24, 04:43 AM
With that much data, you should maintain a complete backup. I'd say that it was better to use two such chips, though I don't think that such is possible.I think it would be posible to divide the chip into an infinite number of autonomos regions, or data blocks. You could then have an infinite number of blocks off the old chip.

:doh:

DaveC426913
2017-Dec-24, 06:02 AM
With that much data, you should maintain a complete backup. I'd say that it was better to use two such chips
Too bad your network throughput is finite. :)

Your screen will perpetually look like a typical Windows update:

DonM435
2017-Dec-24, 04:49 PM
I think it would be posible to divide the chip into an infinite number of autonomos regions, or data blocks. You could then have an infinite number of blocks off the old chip.

:doh:

My first office computer had, I noted, a C:\ drive, a D:\ drive and an E:\ drive. The software routinely accessed C:\, but I carefully backed up my work, putting copies of my documents on D:\, and my programming stuff on E:\.

Eventually, I got an error message that suggested my C:\ drive was failing tests. I asked out staff's official computer ace about what to do.

He informed me that I was out of luck, because he had routinely set up everybody with three partitions -- namely C:, D: and E: -- on a single drive. My bad disk affected everything. (I.e., I should've been copying evrything to floppy disks for backup purposes. My redundancy was illusory.


Two chips would be better, with one stored far from the other. Of course, with that infinite bunch of silicon atoms, they'd probably be too heavy to move anyway.

Chuck
2017-Dec-24, 10:31 PM
Backups were easier on the TRS-80. No hard drive at all and a floppy disk copy program.

DonM435
2017-Dec-25, 12:43 AM
Yeah, but how often did you format the diskette with the data instead of the backup disk? Whoops, all gone!

I only did it a few times.

Jens
2017-Dec-25, 01:40 AM
With that much data, you should maintain a complete backup. I'd say that it was better to use two such chips, though I don't think that such is possible.

I'd be willing to take care of doing the backup, and as long as you'd agree to pay up front, I'd be willing to do it for as low a price per byte that you'd like, as long as it's not zero. :)

John Mendenhall
2017-Dec-25, 01:54 AM
I'd be willing to take care of doing the backup, and as long as you'd agree to pay up front, I'd be willing to do it for as low a price per byte that you'd like, as long as it's not zero. :)

Bill due as soon as all the memory is used up.