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selvaarchi
2017-Dec-27, 06:10 AM
To me 2018 will be the start of the moon decade. Let us find out other views on the subject starting with the oracle - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018_in_spaceflight


2018 is expected to bring a number of milestones in spaceflight. The first crewed missions of both CST-100 Starliner and Dragon 2 capsules to the ISS are scheduled to restore American manned spaceflight capabilities, which stopped with the last Space Shuttle flight in 2011. SpaceX plans to send two space tourists on a free return trajectory around the Moon in late 2018, with a Dragon 2 riding a Falcon Heavy rocket.[1] Falcon Heavy, with an expected maiden flight in January,[2] will have the largest payload to Low Earth orbit of all operational rockets. The maiden flight of NASA's Space Launch System has slipped to 2019.[3]

In planetary exploration, the NASA InSight seismology probe is expected to launch and land on Mars within 2018. ESA and JAXA will launch BepiColombo to Mercury, on a 10-year mission featuring several flybys and eventually deploying two orbiters in 2025 for local study. Two asteroid sampling missions Hayabusa 2 and OSIRIS-REx will reach their respective targets Ryugu and Bennu during summer.

selvaarchi
2017-Dec-27, 12:19 PM
clickorlendo's 2018 space exploration highlights

https://www.clickorlando.com/news/space-news/2018-space-exploration-preview-falcon-heavy-return-to-us-crew


The Space Coast saw more launches in 2017 than ever before. In 2018 that number is expected to increase, and at Kennedy Space Center, the commercial crew program is inching closer to human spaceflight from the U.S. again.

Actually launching something -science experiments, a person's ashes and satellites- to space is becoming increasingly more accessible. Next year, we’ll see it happen more often as existing commercial space companies continue to grow and new companies spring up.

selvaarchi
2017-Dec-27, 12:32 PM
And now from sciencealert.

https://www.sciencealert.com/7-reasons-to-turn-your-eyes-to-the-sky-in-2018


Obviously there will be exciting occurrences we can't predict in the year ahead (hello colliding neutron stars), but to the best of our knowledge, here are seven of the most exciting things to keep your eyes on the sky for in 2018.

selvaarchi
2017-Dec-27, 01:14 PM
and what the Russian's will be doing.

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/2018.html


PLANNED RUSSIAN SPACE MISSIONS IN 2018

The Backroad Astronomer
2017-Dec-27, 05:49 PM
On a some what related note there will be stemfest in Halifax NS this year.
https://stemfest2018.ca/

selvaarchi
2017-Dec-28, 12:57 AM
This has to be one of the highlights next year. The uncontrolled reentry of Tiangong-1. It is expected now between February and end March.

http://www.go-taikonauts.com/en/1907-tiangong-1-re-entry-expected-for-between-beginning-of-february-and-end-of-march-2018


According to the latest forecast, its re-entry is expected between the first 10 days of February and the last 10 days of March 2018.

selvaarchi
2017-Dec-30, 01:48 AM
Emily Lakdawalla on what's Up in Solar System Exploration in 2018

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2017/1227-whats-up-2018.html


2018 is shaping up to be a very busy year in space exploration, with most of the action happening relatively close to Earth. There will be three launches to the Moon and one each toward Mars and Mercury. Two spacecraft will rendezvous with near-Earth asteroids and prepare to descend for samples. We'll see the most distant ever planetary encounter with a tiny Kuiper belt object. And fifteen other spacecraft remain active in science missions at Venus, the Moon, Mars, Ceres, and Jupiter.

selvaarchi
2017-Dec-31, 11:53 AM
The Verge on 2018 highlights

https://www.theverge.com/2017/12/29/16821862/2018-space-missions-rocket-launches-nasa-space-x-elon-musk


Next year is already overflowing with exciting missions to space. NASA is launching a new lander to Mars, as well as a spacecraft that will get closer to the Sun than ever before. And two of NASA’s vehicles already in space will finally arrive at their intended targets: one will rendezvous with a nearby asteroid, while another will pass by a distant space rock billions of miles from Earth.

But it’s not just NASA that has a busy year ahead; the commercial space industry has a number of significant test flights planned, and the launch of one of the world’s most anticipated rockets, the Falcon Heavy, is slated for early 2018. And if all goes well, people may finally ride to space on private vehicles.

Here are all the missions and tests we’re looking forward to in 2018 and when you can expect to see them take off.

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-02, 02:32 AM
Nice roundup of the major launches to look out for from round the world this year.

https://www.upi.com/Science_News/2018/01/01/Space-2018-Missions-and-launches-to-look-for-in-the-new-year/8201514517379/


For astronomers, astrophysicists, planetary scientists, space enthusiasts and others with an eye for the night sky, 2018 is expected to bring a variety of exciting developments.

With dozens of space missions and expeditions set to get under way in 2018, launch complexes around the globe will be busy. U.S. launch pads will be especially busy, as SpaceX looks to launch even more rockets than it did in 2017.

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-02, 04:10 AM
The New York Times on major space highlights in 2018.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/01/science/2018-spacex-moon.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Fsc ience&_r=0


If you love space and astronomy, 2018 will be an exciting year. NASA has announced windows of time for sending spacecraft to Mars and the sun. Japanese and American probes already in space are set to enter orbit around two near Earth asteroids. And a variety of eclipses and meteor showers offer ample opportunities for skygazing.

We’ve put dates for these events and more on The Times’s Astronomy and Space Calendar. But while some dates are certain or proximate, there’s a lot to be unsure about down here on Earth.

Sometimes spacecraft aren’t ready on time for launch. Or their launches get scrubbed because of weather. Some terrestrial space agencies don’t always give much notice when they blast off.

While we aren’t ready to say some space launches will happen on a particular date, these are some of the events we’re watching out for, and we’ll update the calendar when we know more.

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-02, 11:52 AM
Sky and Telescope's looks at 2018 and beyond.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-news/looking-ahead-space-missions-2018/


Yesterday's launch of a Zenit-3F rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan carried AngoSat, Angola's first communications satellite — unremarkable but for marking the last of 85 scheduled launches in 2017.

No new planetary missions departed Earth in 2017, but Juno continued to explore Jupiter, Cassini wrapped up its mission at Saturn in a dramatic Grand Finale, and the current U.S. administration pivoted the focus of NASA's human space exploration once again.

A mission roll call for 2018 reads a lot like our list of space exploration and science missions to watch in 2017, as some launch windows slipped into the next calendar year. But that's space exploration for you. Here are space and science exploration missions to watch for in 2018.

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-03, 10:07 AM
Put your self in next Christmas time. What will you be doing? It is time to get ready for the next show from New Horizon:D.

http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3398/1


On this second day of the new year, you’re probably not yet planning ahead to next New Year’s Day; indeed, you might still be recovering from the celebrations from this New Year’s. Some people, though, know exactly what they’ll be doing—and, perhaps, what you should be doing—on January 1, 2019.

“You should spend your New Year’s Eve with NASA at the John Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab,” said Alan Stern, principal investigator of NASA’s New Horizons mission, during a briefing last month at the Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in New Orleans.

Stern and other members of the New Horizons team will be at APL next New Year’s because that date marks the next major milestone for the mission: the flyby of a Kuiper Belt object known only, for now, as 2014 MU69. (The object will get an unofficial “nickname” in the coming months, the result of a naming contest run by NASA and the mission, although a formal name sanctioned by the International Astronomical Union may not come until after the flyby.)

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-03, 12:44 PM
An update on the number of launches expect to do in 2018 - 45:whistle:

https://gbtimes.com/china-to-attempt-more-than-40-space-launches-in-2017-including-long-march-5-and-lunar-far-side-missions


China could almost double its record for space launches in a year in 2018, with the main space program contractor aiming for 35 launches and additional missions planned by emerging commercial actors.

The ambitious target reflects multiple expanding space programs, a growing commercial space sector and a backlog from 2017.

The China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC), announced at a conference on January 2 that its 2018 work model includes 35 launches, underlining the return to flight of the heavy-lift Long March 5 rocket, the Chang'e-4 lunar far side mission and launches of Beidou navigation satellites as the major activities.

In addition CASIC, a defence contractor, missile maker and sister company of CASC, will carry out a number of missions through its subsidiary EXPACE, including launching four Kuaizhou-1A rockets within one week and the maiden flight of the larger Kuaizhou-11.

Landspace Technology, a Beijing-based private aerospace company, is also expected to debut its LandSpace-1 solid propellant rocket this year.

7cscb
2018-Jan-03, 03:48 PM
I'm a critic of China's opacity. It's hard to figure out where it's going. It seems to me they hinder themselves by cloaking failures in secrecy.

Barring those failures, they could have pulled off 30 or so launches last year. And 40 is attainable this year. That is good news.

USA will likely have a record number too. Privately held SpaceX is setting the bar by reducing $/kg of payload through reusability. It would be good if rocketry could be embraced by deep pocketed Chinese entrepreneurs.

If things go well, there'll be ~120 launches in 2018.

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-03, 04:31 PM
I'm a critic of China's opacity. It's hard to figure out where it's going. It seems to me they hinder themselves by cloaking failures in secrecy.

Barring those failures, they could have pulled off 30 or so launches last year. And 40 is attainable this year. That is good news.

USA will likely have a record number too. Privately held SpaceX is setting the bar by reducing $/kg of payload through reusability. It would be good if rocketry could be embraced by deep pocketed Chinese entrepreneurs.

If things go well, there'll be ~120 launches in 2018.

If all goes well there will be more than 120. China 30 to 40. US 30 to 40, Russia 30+ and ESA, India and Japan 30+ then add all the small rockets coming on stream starting with New Zealand it will be a bumper year.

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-04, 10:38 AM
China's launch schedule for 2018 as reported in NASAspaceflight forum

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=5060.msg1765911#msg1765911


China launches in 2018 (times in UTC)

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-05, 05:40 PM
China's launch schedule for 2018 as reported in NASAspaceflight forum

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=5060.msg1765911#msg1765911

The 1st three launches matches the information from Andrew Jones. That is on the 9th, 11th and 13th.

https://gbtimes.com/china-preparing-for-first-of-around-40-space-missions-planned-for-2018


China will next week carry out the first of around 40 space launches it has planned for 2018, with the Yuanwang-6 space tracking ship setting sail for open waters to assist missions.

The country is aiming for more than 40 launches this year as it looks to bounce back after performing 18 launches from a planned 30. The most China has launched in a year was 22, achieved in 2016.

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-06, 05:19 PM
If all goes well there will be more than 120. China 30 to 40. US 30 to 40, Russia 30+ and ESA, India and Japan 30+ then add all the small rockets coming on stream starting with New Zealand it will be a bumper year.

There I was thinking 40 plus launches was something fantastic than I find out the USSR was launching 100 plus rockets a year :whistle:

http://behindtheblack.com/behind-the-black/essays-and-commentaries/the-state-of-the-worldwide-rocket-industry-at-the-start-of-2018/


In January 2017 I posted a graph that showed the total successful rocket launches, by company and nation, from the years 1998 through 2016. That graph allowed me to note some interesting trends, of which the following were the three most significant:

First, 2016 was the worst year for the Russian rocket industry in decades. In fact, their launch total of only 18 might be the fewest Russian launches in a year since the beginnings of the space race.

Second, China has been aggressively ramping up its launch rate, and in 2016 moved clearly into the top tier of space-faring nations. Their prediction that they are aiming for 30 launches in 2017 is further evidence that this effort is not a temporary thing.

Third, the United States is clearly transitioning away from a government owned and operated rocket industry to one owned and operated by the private sector. Since the retirement of the space shuttle, the federal government has not launched a single rocket that it designed, built, and owns. Instead, every payload put in space by the U.S. has been put there by a private sector rocket.

Below the fold is a new graph. It now includes 2017, but also goes back to 1980, which I think makes a good starting point for the true beginning of the modern the rocket industry. In December 1979 Arianespace successfully completed the first launch of Ariane 1, beginning its effort to build a commercial rocket that would capture market share in the communication satellite industry. In 1980 India launched its first rocket. And in 1981 the space shuttle began flying.

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-09, 11:16 AM
Arianespace is aiming for 14 launches this year. 3 more than last year.

https://www.reuters.com/article/arianespace-prospects/european-satellite-launch-firm-arianespace-expects-record-number-of-launches-for-2018-idUSL8N1P41ZL


European satellite launch company Arianespace, facing competition from newcomers to its market, expects a record number of launches this year, which it said on Tuesday should stand it in good stead for strong future growth.

Arianespace, majority-owned by a joint venture of Airbus and Safran, said it counted on launching 14 satellites in 2018 after carrying out 11 launches in 2017.

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-09, 02:04 PM
2018 is also the year where NASA will be on overdrive to put in place the various components of their deep space exploration systems.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/NASA_Deep_Space_Exploration_Systems_Look_Ahead_to_ Action_Packed_2018_999.html


Engineers preparing NASA's deep space exploration systems to support missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond are gearing up for a busy 2018. The agency aims to complete the manufacturing of all the major hardware by the end of the year for Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), which will pave the road for future missions with astronauts.

Planes, trains, trucks and ships will move across America and over oceans to deliver hardware for assembly and testing of components for the Orion spacecraft and the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket while teams at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida prepare the Ground Systems infrastructure. Testing will take place from the high seas to the high skies and in between throughout the year and across the country, not only in support of EM-1, but also for all subsequent missions.

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-10, 01:00 PM
Florida could see 35 launches this year, up from 19 last year. That will put the USA total to 45 similar China's target for the year.

https://www.floridatoday.com/story/tech/science/space/2018/01/09/air-force-commander-ksc-eastern-range-predicts-big-year-and-beyond-space-coast-rocket-launches/1018649001/


The Space Coast will live up to its moniker this year and beyond as advances spearheaded by the Air Force and space industry boost launch-related activities, the 45th Space Wing's commander said during a Tuesday luncheon in Cape Canaveral.

"I can't imagine, short of the time back in the 60s and 70s, when there was a better time to be in this business," Brig. Gen. Wayne Monteith said during a packed National Space Club Florida Committee luncheon at the Radisson Resort at the Port. "And we get to do it on the Space Coast."

He said the area could see up to 35 launches this year, a healthy increase over last year's 19, though a few will be submarine-launched Trident missiles, which are classified missions. Delays due to weather and hardware issues, though, usually deflate the projected number.