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ngc3314
2018-Feb-02, 09:46 PM
The Galaxy Zoo and Radio Galaxy Zoo projects put forward a successful proposal for Hubble snapshot observations of targets around the sky, using time that would otherwise fall as gaps in the observing schedule. We are asking for public help to decide which of certain galaxy types to put on the coordinate list, since there are many galaxies of special interest (in a number of science categories) than we can add to the list.

More details in the Galaxy Zoo blog. (https://blog.galaxyzoo.org/2018/02/02/gems-of-the-galaxy-zoos-help-pick-hubble-observations/)

Direct project interface (https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/ngc3314/zoogems)

(There will be a parallel Radio Galaxy Zoo interface shortly).

George
2018-Feb-02, 11:04 PM
It lists red galaxies as a choice. If these are redshift red, then would they be great to image as references for future LIGO, and others, merger hits?

ngc3314
2018-Feb-03, 12:24 AM
Red spirals (along with blue ellipticals, distinct outliers from the general population). The assorted Hubble deep and frontier fields have done high-redshift things almost as well as the instrument can do in a reasonable time. (If only those merging binaries would send us a ZIP code in advance...)

George
2018-Feb-03, 03:47 AM
If the Reds, perhaps, make for great JWT targets then to your point in the earlier thread about not having visual compliments might warrant some HST attention now. Is there an existing target list available for the JWT?

ngc3314
2018-Feb-03, 06:16 PM
The deadline for the instrument teams (and usually a set of collaborators) to submit their updated target lists was two days ago. The deadline for standard proposals comes this April. Some areas - near the ecliptic poles, Hubble deep and frontier fields - are sure to see a lot of JWST observations.

ngc3314
2018-Feb-04, 01:25 AM
The flip side of the Gems of the Galaxy Zoos input project - from Radio Galaxy Zoo - has gone live. Many of its targets are radio galaxies with giant ionized gas clouds, or the very rare and informative radio galaxies centered on a spiral rather than the usual elliptical system.

Descriptive blog (https://blog.galaxyzoo.org/2018/02/04/gems-of-the-galaxy-zoos-help-pick-radio-galaxy-zoo-gems/)
Project site (https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/ngc3314/radio-galaxy-zoogems)

This project has an excellent tutorial on why and how (I had no role in putting that together). Also, Cosmoquest regular poster Jean Tate has done almost all the work in picking out the rare spiral hosts, and much of the work in putting together the input project (which would have been rather less useful had I done it myself).

Happy voting!

geonuc
2018-Feb-04, 04:47 PM
Although I like this, I'm hesitant to vote because of ignorance - I have little idea which of the various objects in each category would be more worthy of closer study. I'd just be voting for objects that seem to look cool and wouldn't it be great if we had an HST image of it. 'Coolness' strikes me as a poor factor to consider in selecting HST targets. Hopefully you get a lot of input from more knowledgeable folks.

ngc3314
2018-Feb-04, 07:16 PM
Coolness isn't bad in this case, because the input list has been vetted for science value. For example, I selected ~63 backlit-galaxy systems for the starting list, of which we allocated room for 20 in the final list. Any of them will be informative.

George
2018-Feb-05, 01:37 PM
Any chance H. Voorwerp is not as green?

ngc3314
2018-Feb-05, 02:16 PM
Any chance H. Voorwerp is not as green?

[cheesy robot voice]Unable to parse input. Missing context and comparative.[/cheesy robot voice]

Hanny's Voorwerp is what it is. Some of the Radio Galaxy Zoo Green galaxies almost certainly have clouds of similar ionization level, whether due to a fading central AGN, extant AGN or interaction with the escaping plasma jets. A few of them have spectra; the new HST images would give hints from the gas structure and allow more intelligently targeted followup spectroscopy. There are also ~4 recently-reported Galaxy Zoo candidates for giant emission clouds, which go on the HST input list anyway so are not showing up for voting (like other categories with <10 entries).

Jean Tate
2018-Feb-05, 10:03 PM
Thanks for the kind words, ngc3314.

I should point out that ngc3314 was the one who spotted the STScI announcement (a request for proposals), worked tirelessly to bring it to our attention, pulled together the various (some quite long) lists of suggestions, came up with the idea of using the Zooniverse's Project Builder to create a voting site, .... in other words, played an absolutely key part.


Although I like this, I'm hesitant to vote because of ignorance - I have little idea which of the various objects in each category would be more worthy of closer study. I'd just be voting for objects that seem to look cool and wouldn't it be great if we had an HST image of it. 'Coolness' strikes me as a poor factor to consider in selecting HST targets. Hopefully you get a lot of input from more knowledgeable folks.

The Radio GalaxyZooGems may seem a bit daunting at first, but it's actually very simple. There are two kinds of galaxies, the known "green" hosts of radio emission (the GreenDRAGNs), and the SDRAGN candidates (DRAGN? Double-lobed Radio sources associated with Active Galactic Nuclei).

For the GreenDRAGNs the task is simple: which of the hosts (always in the center of the images, the right-hand one is about as good as you can do with SDSS) do you think would most benefit being snapped by the Hubble? The main advantage of the Hubble is its unsurpassed resolution.

For the SDRAGN candidates it's a little more involved, but not much. For galaxies which are clearly hosts (i.e. they - or their nuclei - are definitely a source of the radio emission you can see, via the contours), it's the same task (which would best benefit by being observed by the Hubble?). For those without a clear core (in radio-speak, the origin of the jets which create the lobes; almost always the nucleus of a galaxy), is the galaxy in the center likely - in your view - to be the host? If so, it's the same task as above; if not, vote "Lowest priority". I guess it gets a bit tricky when the answers are no longer clearly "yes" or "no" ... that's why I created "Low", "Medium priority", and "High", just for the fence-sitters! (Actually ngc3314 created those choices, I just copied them).

Happy hunting! :D

Jean Tate
2018-Feb-19, 12:18 AM
Voting has now closed, in both projects (link (https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/ngc3314/zoogems/talk/1397/543433?page=2&scrollToLastComment=true), and link (https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/ngc3314/radio-galaxy-zoogems/talk/1491/550997)).

Just sit back and wait? Nothing more for ordinary folk to do?

Not at all!

Credit needs to be given, for all objects the Hubble ends up observing, so Which zooite first noted a Subject? Who first said it is unusual? (https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/ngc3314/zoogems/talk/1397/549983)

Of more immediacy, there's Selecting the ACS filters to use (https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/ngc3314/radio-galaxy-zoogems/talk/1398/548841)

ngc3314
2018-Feb-19, 02:14 AM
Of more immediacy, there's Selecting the ACS filters to use (https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/ngc3314/radio-galaxy-zoogems/talk/1398/548841)

This is particularly urgent. As in "composed email in Russian on a Sunday night to verify filters used in a composite image" urgent. With the nominal deadline 10 days off, STScI has already asked when to expect the configuration file. I think that's good, meaning they want to start putting these "gap-filler" programs into the schedule right away.