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View Full Version : Tonight's close Enceladus flyby



AK
2005-Mar-09, 10:49 AM
Man, I can't wait for those pictures.

cyswxman
2005-Mar-09, 12:00 PM
some information (http://ciclops.lpl.arizona.edu/view.php?id=766&www=a07cd4526c9f95c69e9ab77574acd9 cb)

Kullat Nunu
2005-Mar-09, 07:19 PM
Few previews (http://ciclops.lpl.arizona.edu/ir_index.php?id=10&www=a07cd4526c9f95c69e9ab77574a cd9cb). There seems to be some new Titan mosaics also.

V-GER
2005-Mar-10, 01:17 AM
Here are the raw images:
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/raw-images-list.cfm?browseLatest=0&cacheQ=0&storedQ=0

pretty good...

and a larger image as well: http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/110551main_enceladus-030905-browse.jpg

frogesque
2005-Mar-10, 01:42 AM
Here are the raw images:
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/raw-images-list.cfm?browseLatest=0&cacheQ=0&storedQ=0

pretty good...

and a larger image as well: http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/110551main_enceladus-030905-browse.jpg

Enceladus is just plain wierd :o

V-GER
2005-Mar-10, 02:05 AM
frogesque wrote:

Enceladus is just plain wierd

It sure is, to me it looks like it's covered with a smooth layer of fine dust(in reality ice?)with craters and "dry river bed"-like features. How were these features formed?

um3k
2005-Mar-10, 02:10 AM
Here is a color image, created by myself (click the thumbnail for a larger image):
http://home.neo.rr.com/pzps/EncCasF2I1-thm.png (http://home.neo.rr.com/pzps/EncCasF2I1.jpg)
Made from infrared, green, and ultraviolet images.

The Bad Astronomer
2005-Mar-10, 02:14 AM
Wow, a twofer (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/raw-images-details.cfm?feiImageID=34731)! :o And look here, when worlds almost collide (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/raw-images-details.cfm?feiImageID=34703)! :D

Enceladus is weird, but it looks a lot like Europa to me. Interesting features.

V-GER
2005-Mar-10, 02:14 AM
Looks great!

Tacitus
2005-Mar-10, 05:05 AM
Looks great!

All those lovely crinkly edges. :wink:

Matt McIrvin
2005-Mar-10, 05:40 AM
Here is a color image, created by myself ...
Made from infrared, green, and ultraviolet images.

There's something very strange-looking about these IR/green/UV composites of Enceladus, more so than with the other moons. It's almost as if the spectral reflectivity of the ice varies with angle, or something like that.

Doodler
2005-Mar-10, 05:52 AM
I was just thinking about the Europa comparison, though its surface is MUCH more cratered. I wouldn't be surprised if those valleys weren't born of the same mechanism.

kucharek
2005-Mar-10, 06:58 AM
Nice cracks. Somethin's hatching? ;-)

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/raw-images-details.cfm?feiImageID=34936

Crazieman
2005-Mar-10, 09:27 AM
It looks like Europa, but its missing the mystery-red shading in some of the cracks.

Kullat Nunu
2005-Mar-10, 01:20 PM
Enceladus from 4,177 km (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/raw-images-details.cfm?feiImageID=34984)

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/casJPGThumbS09/N00030111.jpg

Looks almost like over-zoomed image map! Clearly the cracks and wrinkles have some minimum size.

Matt McIrvin
2005-Mar-10, 02:17 PM
It looks like Europa, but its missing the mystery-red shading in some of the cracks.

While they don't have the Europan shading, the cracks do seem to have some color in them in the compressed-spectrum composites; they reflect less in both the UV and IR than the surrounding terrain, so they look sort of greenish in those pictures (but they're probably just white in visible light).

Matt McIrvin
2005-Mar-10, 02:18 PM
Looks almost like over-zoomed image map! Clearly the cracks and wrinkles have some minimum size.

And sometimes the cracks develop sinusoidal wiggles in them that have a characteristic frequency, especially when they cross hills or craters.

ngc3314
2005-Mar-10, 02:53 PM
Looks almost like over-zoomed image map! Clearly the cracks and wrinkles have some minimum size.

And sometimes the cracks develop sinusoidal wiggles in them that have a characteristic frequency, especially when they cross hills or craters.

This one is a real zoo. Various pieces of the surface seem to have had the (most recent) ridges/valleys show up at different times, based on the crater density and whether some of them cross craters. Furthermore, the lineaments (lovely weasel word, that) which cross craters include the narrowest ones I see, which might mean that some sort of slumping smooths them out with time. Some regions are almost crater-free, meaning that Enceladus kept this up for a long time in some places and not in others.

Anybody else notice the series of full-disk shots during approach, with a tiny piece of Saturn filling the whole background field?