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banquo's_bumble_puppy
2005-Mar-09, 12:56 PM
http://www.livescience.com/forcesofnature/050308_super_volcano.html

found this on GLP...so...legit or not?

cyswxman
2005-Mar-09, 01:13 PM
Sure, it's happened before, so it could happen again. Very likely not anytime soon.

Nergal
2005-Mar-09, 01:40 PM
http://www.livescience.com/forcesofnature/050308_super_volcano.html

found this on GLP...so...legit or not?
Yup, it's legit.

If I recall right, Discovery channel had volcano show on Super Volcanos that covered pretty much the same ground.

gethen
2005-Mar-09, 02:27 PM
Well, those scientists did say several times that there wasn't much we could do about such an eruption, so I see no point in worrying about it. 8)

jfribrg
2005-Mar-09, 02:29 PM
even science fiction cannot produce a credible mechanism for averting a super eruption. No strategies can be envisaged for reducing the power of major volcanic eruptions.
...
The scientists this week called for more funding to investigate further the history of super eruptions and their likely effects on the planet and on modern society.



In a nutshell, they are saying that there is nothing we can possibly do about it, but send us money anyway.

mid
2005-Mar-09, 02:40 PM
Part of me finds Supervolcanism really interesting; the whole 'wonder and power of nature' appeals to the same neurons that love Asteroid Impact theories, Tornadoes and so on.

Part of me can't get rid of the surreal image of Mount St. Helens dressed in red and blue, however.

the_shaggy_one
2005-Mar-09, 02:49 PM
Maybe we can make an ark out of unobtainium? :P

jfribrg
2005-Mar-09, 03:24 PM
lets not anyone tell bmpbmp. He worries enough every time he looks up. Doesn't need to also worry every time he looks down.

Essan
2005-Mar-09, 04:25 PM
A cynic might find it a little suspicious that this 'news story' has hit the headlines in the UK just a few days before the BBC broadcast a docu-drama entitled Supervolcano.....

Today's Times Newspaper (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-1516780,00.html)

Details of the BBC Programme (http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/programmes/supervolcano/programme.shtml)

(Edited to correct URL)

Amadeus
2005-Mar-09, 04:51 PM
Well, those scientists did say several times that there wasn't much we could do about such an eruption, so I see no point in worrying about it. 8)

Question for the geologists on this board. When dealing with volcanos why dont we drill down though to the magma chamber and release the magma in a controlled way?

Spacewriter
2005-Mar-09, 04:58 PM
Well, those scientists did say several times that there wasn't much we could do about such an eruption, so I see no point in worrying about it. 8)

Question for the geologists on this board. When dealing with volcanos why dont we drill down though to the magma chamber and release the magma in a controlled way?

Heh. You've never been to a real volcano, have you?

Lurker
2005-Mar-09, 05:53 PM
This sort of thing will definitely happen again. The yellowstone caldera was the result of only the most recent "supervolcanic" eruption in that area. As the north american plate moves west, there is a stationary mantal hotspot that is acting like a blow torch (http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/images/2000-rbs-1.3ysrp_large.jpg)and cutting through the plate. It's soo cool. It does mean, however, that the next large scale eruption is just a matter of time. How much time is, of course, the question everyone wants to answer. There's no evidence, though, that its gunna happen very soon.


Edited to change link to bigger jpg of the map.

beskeptical
2005-Mar-09, 07:13 PM
The Yellowstone Caldera (http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/activity.html) 'breathes' and is clearly still alive. :o

In the 1970s, scientists discovered that there had been over two feet of vertical uplift in the caldera since 1923, and began leveling surveys to accurately measure recent uplift. During the past ten years scientists have been applying new satellite-based surveying techniques, including GPS and radar measurements, for an increased understanding of the slow up and down ground movements of the Yellowstone caldera above the subterranean magma and hydrothermal systems.

On the other hand, I think we'll get a bit of warning. Mt St Helens was bulging at a rate of 10 FEET A DAY just before she blew.

As to why not drill into a volcano? The problem with the Cascade type volcanoes isn't the lava, it's the released gases when the cork comes off, (like your shaken soda bottle). It wouldn't be very practical to try and bleed off the gases since they aren't in some nice obvious pocket and much of the gases are still dissolved in the magma until the pressure valve comes off.

Majin Vegeta
2005-Mar-09, 09:47 PM
It requires atleast 50% Melt (lava) to erupt, They can tell how much is in there by the activity of the volcanoe, And scientests estimate around 10% is melt therefore no threat right now..

Brady Yoon
2005-Mar-09, 10:08 PM
lets not anyone tell bmpbmp. He worries enough every time he looks up. Doesn't need to also worry every time he looks down.

If he worries about that kind of stuff, I don't know what to say... :roll:

Majin Vegeta
2005-Mar-09, 10:25 PM
bmpbmp worries about everything, Probably thinks the rapture is here every haze moon :lol:

BAroxMysox
2005-Mar-10, 01:11 AM
I had emailed one of the guys at the USGS here at the U of U awhile back about this. Based on the average intervals between eruptions (which don't really mean anything) there would still be about 60,000 years left. He was still confident that it would be +/- about that long anyway.

There's a large bulge building up under Yellowstone Lake related to all this that they're expecting to erupt long before the actual caldera, which would be pretty interesting. Possibly creating a nifty new feature there.

Gullible Jones
2005-Mar-10, 01:16 AM
bmpbmp worries about everything, Probably thinks the rapture is here every haze moon

That's not funny, Vegeta... I think you ought to apologize. Some people can't help worrying.

Lurker
2005-Mar-10, 01:27 AM
There's a large bulge building up under Yellowstone Lake related to all this that they're expecting to erupt long before the actual caldera, which would be pretty interesting. Possibly creating a nifty new feature there.
I'm curious... when do the expect this eruption to occur? Decades, centuries?? Just curious about an order of magnitude??

BAroxMysox
2005-Mar-10, 01:41 AM
There's a large bulge building up under Yellowstone Lake related to all this that they're expecting to erupt long before the actual caldera, which would be pretty interesting. Possibly creating a nifty new feature there.
I'm curious... when do the expect this eruption to occur? Decades, centuries?? Just curious about an order of magnitude??

I haven't seen anything specific. I've seen guesses at around a decade or two at various sites, based on the rate it was growing, but, officially, they're still unsure whether or not it's actually going to pop. They say the only concern is a hydrothermal explosion, which should be localized and create new features.

http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/new.html


We have absolutely no concern that the so-called "bulge" could be
associated with a volcanic eruption. If there is any hazard it would be
hydrothermal explosions. These could be dangerous to nearby buildings, but
would not have a regional effect. Essentially, these are steam explosions
of the hot water in the geothermal system.

Doodler
2005-Mar-10, 05:37 AM
bmpbmp worries about everything, Probably thinks the rapture is here every haze moon

That's not funny, Vegeta... I think you ought to apologize. Some people can't help worrying.

Just a note, Vegeta isn't the only one picking on Bmpbmp. Not that I disagree that our resident doomsayer doesn't need to learn to add a dash of salt (in some cases, much more) to his online tabloid reading, but at least he's asking the right forum for his explanations. Even as I cringe a bit at the concerns he raises, I'm at least relieved he comes here rather than GLP (that is a truly scary thought).

To those that see Bmpbmp's name on a post and clench your teeth, keep in mind, that's partly why this place exists (Not throwing stones at in a glass house. I'm guilty of groaning aloud sometimes, too). Bb is just a bit, well, extreme about it.

OT: I have to admit that the Yellowstone supervolcano does rattle me a bit. Not that I'm concerned about an imminent eruption, but when a geologist tells you that 25% of your homeland is going to up and pop on a cataclysmic scale at some point in the indeterminate future, you do sit up and take note. I'm half surprised there's not a super-v disaster movie in the works.

Jpax2003
2005-Mar-10, 07:09 AM
OT: I have to admit that the Yellowstone supervolcano does rattle me a bit. Not that I'm concerned about an imminent eruption, but when a geologist tells you that 25% of your homeland is going to up and pop on a cataclysmic scale at some point in the indeterminate future, you do sit up and take note. I'm half surprised there's not a super-v disaster movie in the works.It would be hard to write a movie for that phenomena and have a happy ending. It's not something small that can be escaped easily. It's not avoidable in the same way that asteroids/comets potentially are. The movie would be a series of scenes with increasing loudness of "oh poo" and then everyone dies. Maybe some eccentric billionaire and a pretty lady escape on a Space Ship One type craft to Argentina. Imagine the movie Deep Impact if the big comet did hit.

frogesque
2005-Mar-10, 10:20 AM
My take on bmpbmp's posts is that the board has done a great job and I seem to detect the questions are no longer asked in a blind panic but more of a concerned enquiry. I think its great that BA has become something of a refuge and comfort and he is starting to show a lot more respect and wonder for the real forces of nature rather than jumping up and down at the latest woo.

Regarding the supervolcano, they have happened in the past and will happen at sometime in the future. As has been pointed out, for known caldera we will get a good warning but for unknown or submarine events those of us left will have a bit of new map making to do. Cataclymic events maybe make good drama but the daily road toll goes largely unreported on National news. Just keep a sense of perspective.

Edit: had the wrong poster in the opening sentance. Sorry for any confusion

papageno
2005-Mar-10, 10:29 AM
A cynic might find it a little suspicious that this 'news story' has hit the headlines in the UK just a few days before the BBC broadcast a docu-drama entitled Supervolcano.....

Today's Times Newspaper (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-1516780,00.html)

Details of the BBC Programme (http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/programmes/supervolcano/programme.shtml)

(Edited to correct URL)

Yesterday I saw a trailer for this programme.
I never heard of it before, and I was wondering "What are they going to call it? Supervolcano?" 8)

cyswxman
2005-Mar-10, 11:00 AM
Not really worried about it, even though it is only about 200 miles from me. :o

jofg
2005-Mar-10, 01:07 PM
So how many of these super volcanoes are there? Yellowstone is one - and if/when it ever goes so goes most of the USA/North America as I understand it. What other nations/continents have these super V's and are any of those likely to pop soon (soon, of course, being a relative term)?

cyswxman
2005-Mar-10, 01:19 PM
So how many of these super volcanoes are there? Yellowstone is one - and if/when it ever goes so goes most of the USA/North America as I understand it. What other nations/continents have these super V's and are any of those likely to pop soon (soon, of course, being a relative term)?
Some answers located here (http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/faqs.html)

hewhocaves
2005-Mar-10, 04:04 PM
Well, those scientists did say several times that there wasn't much we could do about such an eruption, so I see no point in worrying about it. 8)

Question for the geologists on this board. When dealing with volcanos why dont we drill down though to the magma chamber and release the magma in a controlled way?

that's not the sort of thing you want to try out for the first time on the continental US.
We have no real experience in manipulating the earth like that. not saying it isn't impossible, but we're still a far cry from "star trek". and if you notice... they're usually in orbit when they try that lol.

Part of the problem rests with the type of lava. consider the differences between Mauna Kea and Vesuvius, for example. Part of the differences in the way that they erupted is that their lava is composed differently (if I remember my basic geology correctly)

John

W.F. Tomba
2005-Mar-10, 04:22 PM
My take on banquo's_bumble_puppy's posts is that the board has done a great job and I seem to detect the questions are no longer asked in a blind panic but more of a concerned enquiry.I think bmpbmp and banquo's_bumble_puppy are two different people. I know they've both posted in the past couple of days.

Essan
2005-Mar-10, 04:55 PM
So how many of these super volcanoes are there? Yellowstone is one - and if/when it ever goes so goes most of the USA/North America as I understand it. What other nations/continents have these super V's and are any of those likely to pop soon (soon, of course, being a relative term)?
Some answers located here (http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/faqs.html)

There's also one under Naples, Italy - just so us Europeans don't feel left out.....

Doodler
2005-Mar-10, 05:50 PM
OT: I have to admit that the Yellowstone supervolcano does rattle me a bit. Not that I'm concerned about an imminent eruption, but when a geologist tells you that 25% of your homeland is going to up and pop on a cataclysmic scale at some point in the indeterminate future, you do sit up and take note. I'm half surprised there's not a super-v disaster movie in the works.It would be hard to write a movie for that phenomena and have a happy ending. It's not something small that can be escaped easily. It's not avoidable in the same way that asteroids/comets potentially are. The movie would be a series of scenes with increasing loudness of "oh poo" and then everyone dies. Maybe some eccentric billionaire and a pretty lady escape on a Space Ship One type craft to Argentina. Imagine the movie Deep Impact if the big comet did hit.

I'm sure some Hollywood writer can work up a thermo-nukyular, 11th hour, cheap save the western hemisphere routine...

hewhocaves
2005-Mar-10, 06:28 PM
OT: I have to admit that the Yellowstone supervolcano does rattle me a bit. Not that I'm concerned about an imminent eruption, but when a geologist tells you that 25% of your homeland is going to up and pop on a cataclysmic scale at some point in the indeterminate future, you do sit up and take note. I'm half surprised there's not a super-v disaster movie in the works.It would be hard to write a movie for that phenomena and have a happy ending. It's not something small that can be escaped easily. It's not avoidable in the same way that asteroids/comets potentially are. The movie would be a series of scenes with increasing loudness of "oh poo" and then everyone dies. Maybe some eccentric billionaire and a pretty lady escape on a Space Ship One type craft to Argentina. Imagine the movie Deep Impact if the big comet did hit.

I'm sure some Hollywood writer can work up a thermo-nukyular, 11th hour, cheap save the western hemisphere routine...

I'm not sure, exactly, if the population of the world would be totally screwed, supervolcanowise. you can kiss the midwest and a fair chunk of hte east coast good-bye and the "global cooling" effect would be pretty nasty... but the "total collapse of the biosphere" like i've heard some people suggest on other sites seems a bit far fetched.

After all, it DID happen 600,000 YA and there wasn't a mass extinction then.

John

Majin Vegeta
2005-Mar-10, 09:12 PM
Would cooling really be that much of a problem? I mean, All those moronic vegetarians would die, right? :lol: But the temprature drop would be to like 10- DF Right? Thats not really so bad considering humans survived the last one.. We have clothes and eat meat.. Unlike other animals we also have the invention of fire!

@ My Comment on bmpbmp - I didn't mean anything by it, Afterall this is the place to come to avoid hysteria, Riiiiiight? :wink:

frogesque
2005-Mar-10, 09:33 PM
My take on banquo's_bumble_puppy's posts is that the board has done a great job and I seem to detect the questions are no longer asked in a blind panic but more of a concerned enquiry.I think bmpbmp and banquo's_bumble_puppy are two different people. I know they've both posted in the past couple of days.

:oops: Note to self : Do not post before the regulation 3 cups tea/coffe in the morning especially after only 4 hour's sleep.

I did mean bmpbmp and my apologies for any confusion. Original post has been edited

Doodler
2005-Mar-10, 09:42 PM
OT: I have to admit that the Yellowstone supervolcano does rattle me a bit. Not that I'm concerned about an imminent eruption, but when a geologist tells you that 25% of your homeland is going to up and pop on a cataclysmic scale at some point in the indeterminate future, you do sit up and take note. I'm half surprised there's not a super-v disaster movie in the works.It would be hard to write a movie for that phenomena and have a happy ending. It's not something small that can be escaped easily. It's not avoidable in the same way that asteroids/comets potentially are. The movie would be a series of scenes with increasing loudness of "oh poo" and then everyone dies. Maybe some eccentric billionaire and a pretty lady escape on a Space Ship One type craft to Argentina. Imagine the movie Deep Impact if the big comet did hit.

I'm sure some Hollywood writer can work up a thermo-nukyular, 11th hour, cheap save the western hemisphere routine...

I'm not sure, exactly, if the population of the world would be totally screwed, supervolcanowise. you can kiss the midwest and a fair chunk of hte east coast good-bye and the "global cooling" effect would be pretty nasty... but the "total collapse of the biosphere" like i've heard some people suggest on other sites seems a bit far fetched.

After all, it DID happen 600,000 YA and there wasn't a mass extinction then.

John

Agreed, I did say just the western hemisphere. :) Depending on the location, wouldn't the ash cloud have some difficulty migrating across the equator? Prevailing wind patterns would make rapid scattering across the doldrums a bit challenging.

Jpax2003
2005-Mar-11, 02:28 AM
OT: I have to admit that the Yellowstone supervolcano does rattle me a bit. Not that I'm concerned about an imminent eruption, but when a geologist tells you that 25% of your homeland is going to up and pop on a cataclysmic scale at some point in the indeterminate future, you do sit up and take note. I'm half surprised there's not a super-v disaster movie in the works.It would be hard to write a movie for that phenomena and have a happy ending. It's not something small that can be escaped easily. It's not avoidable in the same way that asteroids/comets potentially are. The movie would be a series of scenes with increasing loudness of "oh poo" and then everyone dies. Maybe some eccentric billionaire and a pretty lady escape on a Space Ship One type craft to Argentina. Imagine the movie Deep Impact if the big comet did hit.

I'm sure some Hollywood writer can work up a thermo-nukyular, 11th hour, cheap save the western hemisphere routine...I got it, we send a Core style craft down with a nukyular warhead to cause the lower crust to fracture so that the explosive energy would come out of all the older yellowstone calderas instead of just one, thus distributing the eruption causing less damage! Of course there is a paramilitary Mountain Militia that thinks this is all a plan by the government to destroy the world and they try to stop it, but they end up incinerated in the end by a crack in the earth that chases them into montana and stops as soon as it catches them on a mountain top. Or maybe the milita-men are on the side of the government and are the only ones able to stop the eco-terrorists who think the earth-gaia should be allowed to exterminate humanity as natural. Hmmm, yeah, this works... the military is too busy with riot control in the cities to stop the eco-terrorists who are trying to stop the nukyular weapon, which is ungarded except for a female scientist and a male political reject who lost the race for mayor of some local hamlet because of some spotted-owl type issue. So they enlist the help of the militia men, because they refuse to relocate because they think they have enough supplies in their blast shelters to survive the supervolcano eruption. This will be so cool! I bet it will make 100 Million in the First Week! :roll:

publiusr
2005-Mar-11, 09:00 PM
I think La Garita is the largest of the American volcanoes.

Majin Vegeta
2005-Mar-11, 11:54 PM
Wheres that at? North or South America?

Magnitudes

MT. ST. Helens:: Mag 5
Yellowstone:: Mag 5000

^ Difference!

Brady Yoon
2005-Mar-12, 01:41 AM
Wheres that at? North or South America?

Magnitudes

MT. ST. Helens:: Mag 5
Yellowstone:: Mag 5000

^ Difference!

What do you mean by magnitudes here? Not Richter scale...?

Majin Vegeta
2005-Mar-12, 02:05 AM
You see, Volcanoes are judged on the Magnitude Scale similar to earth Quakes, At 1 is the underwater volcanoes and the hawaii ones that flow continually, At 3 is the canary islands Volcanoes, Mt St Helens was 5/8 on the scale, Yellowstone is a 5000/8 on the scale! It goes over the scale by 4992 Magnitudes.

Hamlet
2005-Mar-12, 02:53 PM
I just saw an advertisement for a program on The Discovery Channel called: America's Volcanoes: Sitting on a Powder Keg. It airs tonight at 9pm EST. I'll probably check it out.

collegeguy
2005-Mar-12, 06:13 PM
I just saw an advertisement for a program on The Discovery Channel called: America's Volcanoes: Sitting on a Powder Keg. It airs tonight at 9pm EST. I'll probably check it out.

Thanks for the info. I will check it out.

beskeptical
2005-Mar-12, 06:31 PM
I think La Garita is the largest of the American volcanoes. La Garita (http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/Products/Pglossary/caldera.html) is a caldera in Colorado but I'm not sure it was the biggest eruption.
* Caldera-forming eruptions are the largest eruptions on Earth. For example, the Fish Canyon eruption in southwestern Colorado (United States) about 28 million years ago erupted more than 5,000 km3 of magma from La Garita caldera. That's enough magma to bury the entire state of California to a depth of nearly 12 m!
This web page (http://users.bendnet.com/bjensen/volcano/largerup.html) lists at least 2 eruptions in Utah that had more volume ejected. But it also has different figures for La Garita. I guess if we had to choose the USGS would be more credible.

But either way, it's a bit shocking to see how many 'super volcanoes' there are in the US. I was under the impression Yellowstone was unique to the continent.

Long Valley in California, though it last erupted a very long time ago, has much bigger potential than I realized. It is closely monitored because there has been past uplift and frequent minor quakes. It is not currently worrisome but isn't totally quiet either.

Long Valley info, (http://lvo.wr.usgs.gov/) and latest quakes. (http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/recenteqs/Maps/Long_Valley.html)

Brady Yoon
2005-Mar-12, 09:54 PM
You see, Volcanoes are judged on the Magnitude Scale similar to earth Quakes, At 1 is the underwater volcanoes and the hawaii ones that flow continually, At 3 is the canary islands Volcanoes, Mt St Helens was 5/8 on the scale, Yellowstone is a 5000/8 on the scale! It goes over the scale by 4992 Magnitudes.

I remember now, it's called the VEI (Volcano Explosivity Index). You're really wrong on Yellowstone's Index. On a scale 1-8, why would it go up to 5,000? Where did you find this?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VEI

Scroll down and you'll see the Yellowstone was 8/8. If it was a scale like the Richter scale in earthquakes, it wouldn't be x/8, which obviously tells you that the maximum number is 8. And something wouldn't go to 5000 when the scale is 8. Maybe 9-12, but not 5,000.

Maybe you're thinking that since Mount St. Helens is a 5 on the index, and Yellowstone released 1,000 times more debris, then it would be a 5,000. But the VEI isn't a linear scale, it's probably exponential.

Majin Vegeta
2005-Mar-12, 11:01 PM
Discovery Channel or NatGeo channel one, Said Mt. St. Helens was a 5, It said yellowstone was an 8 but it was 1000x Bigger and if the scale went up enough would make about a 5000 on the scale.

Crazieman
2005-Mar-13, 03:05 AM
Just saw an ad on Discovery channel, they're the first ones doing a Yellowstone movie

Link (http://www.discovery.com/supervolcano)

beskeptical
2005-Mar-13, 05:16 AM
Just saw an ad on Discovery channel, they're the first ones doing a Yellowstone movie

Link (http://www.discovery.com/supervolcano)Oh that is a fun trailer. =D>

Sticks
2005-Mar-13, 08:41 AM
We are getting that in two parts, tonight and tomorrow on BBC1 at 21:00 - 22:00

After it on BBC2 at 22:00 there is some kind of Horizon programme on each night discussing the science

see this link (http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/programmes/supervolcano/index.shtml)

Maksutov
2005-Mar-13, 12:24 PM
Let's not forget Mount Rainier! (http://www.smithsonianmag.si.edu/smithsonian/issues96/jul96/rainier.html)

More here. (http://www.stevequayle.com/News.alert/03_Yellowstone/030812.Mt.Rainier.threat.html)

Jpax2003
2005-Mar-13, 05:25 PM
Let's not forget Mount Rainier! (http://www.smithsonianmag.si.edu/smithsonian/issues96/jul96/rainier.html)

More here. (http://www.stevequayle.com/News.alert/03_Yellowstone/030812.Mt.Rainier.threat.html)Mt. Rainier, while super and a volcano, is not a Supervolcano. They spent a lot of time talking about it on the America's Volcanoes Documentary.

beskeptical
2005-Mar-13, 07:48 PM
Here's a link to the explosivity index (http://volcano.und.nodak.edu/vwdocs/frequent_questions/grp8/question389.html) that hasn't yet been posted.

I wonder if I can get the BBC channel streaming online? Those programs look very interesting.

Discovery channel had a great program on last night about the Tambora eruption of 1817. (1819?) It wasn't listed in the channel guide and I can't find it on their site either. I found some stuff on the researchers involved and some preliminary discussions about the fact they were making a film. Discovery must have upped the planned date or something. It was a 2005 film.

Anyway, I missed the part where they explored to caldera floor. If anyone sees this program on a future channel schedule let me know. I would watch it again. Or if you saw it, what did they find in the caldera?

collegeguy
2005-Mar-13, 08:41 PM
Some articles on the possible next eruption of Yellowstone differ. This one seems to hint that we are overdue for one:

http://www.livescience.com/forcesofnature/050308_super_volcano.html

Here is an excerpt:

Explosions of this magnitude "happen about every 600,000 years at Yellowstone," says Chuck Wicks of the U.S. Geological Survey, who has studied the possibilities in separate work. "And it's been about 620,000 years since the last super explosive eruption there."

However, this other site implies we can't talk about an eruption being overdue:

http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/faqs4.html#eruptagain

I guess it is typical to find some differences in this kind of info [-(

Sticks
2005-Mar-14, 10:59 PM
One is set up by the US government, one is not

Should that tell you which one to trust :-k

beskeptical
2005-Mar-14, 11:03 PM
One is set up by the US government, one is not

Should that tell you which one to trust :-kYah but the one that isn't the government is selling TV shows. Dull doesn't sell. 8)

publiusr
2005-Mar-16, 06:29 PM
I wonder if there were any super-volcanoes in Siberia so far undiscovered.