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Brady Yoon
2005-Mar-12, 01:53 AM
In my biology class, I think the unit on evolution has been cut out. A lot. In genetics and ecology, we went in lots and lots of detail for months at times, but in evolution, I think the standards are very small. The unit on evolution is only two weeks, and it only concerns microevolution, change in characteristics, instead of macroevolution, changes in entire species. It bugs me that in a science class, the full spectrum of biology isn't being taught. I said in a post in another topic that there should be theology classes or clubs dealing with religion, but this is a science class! Can't they teach what's really going on in evolution?

It annoys me so much when people question evolution by saying "so you expect us to believe that humans came from plants?" Questioning is good, but at least question with right facts...

I thought all the topics regarding the decline of science education were exaggerated, but I'm starting to agree now.. :(

Madcat
2005-Mar-12, 05:07 AM
*sigh* As a bio major who intends to pursue a PhD in Ecology next year, I am very confused that they would teach you ecology and cripple your learning of evolution. That's contradictory. Don't worry; it gets better in college.

By the way, who thought people came from plants? :(

Maksutov
2005-Mar-12, 05:50 AM
*sigh* As a bio major who intends to pursue a PhD in Ecology next year, I am very confused that they would teach you ecology and cripple your learning of evolution. That's contradictory. Don't worry; it gets better in college.

By the way, who thought people came from plants? :(
Could be the following:

Pat Rubberson
Jerry Fallow
Oral Yogurts
Jimmy and Tammy Faye Bakkerteria (http://www.rotten.com/library/bio/religion/televangelists/jim-bakker/)*
Jimmy Swalgaert
Beanie Hinn
Billy Graham Cracker (http://www.snopes.com/food/origins/graham.htm)
Paul and Jan "Granola" Crunch
John "Trillium" Hagae
Hal Linseed
Jack-in-the-pulpit Van Impe
Kenneth Cropland

and, of course,

Jesse Duplantis

Then again, maybe not...perhaps that's just a list of unevolved plant life.


*WARNING: Adult language at link.

The Bad Astronomer
2005-Mar-12, 05:53 AM
If you really think they may be cutting out evolution, you need to talk to Eugenie Scott. She is the country's leading fighter against creationism, and a friend of mine. She knows a lot about teaching evolution in the U.S.

Contact her through her group, the National Center for Science Education (http://www.ncseweb.org) (contact info is at the bottom of the page). If you email her, it might help to put my name in the subject line to make sure she sees it. Let her know what's going on. It may be nothing, just the way the teacher teaches, given classroom time constraints. Or there might be trouble brewing. Either way, it's best to check with her. She might have more info.

And let us know what happens!

darkhunter
2005-Mar-12, 07:23 AM
When I was in high school, we started our own science club :D . We had an ecellent boilogy teacher--when we got to that section he told us what areas he wasn't allowed to teach (even though he wanted to), but he would answer any question we asked. It was just a mater of talking to him and him acting as the "sponsor" to let us into the science classroom after school.

We got to do electrophoresis (http://www.bergen.org/AAST/Projects/Gel/) as one of our projects (and give a presentation to the class on it). We also went into some applied pysics--we were given a few simple materials and had to drop an egg from the top of a step ladder without breaking it...

Basically--just find a few folks who are interested and approach your science teacher and ask--it won't hurt (the worse that can happen is that you get told "no")

WaxRubiks
2005-Mar-12, 08:05 AM
you can get an evolution supporting hat at http://www.evolvefish.com

zebo-the-fat
2005-Mar-12, 01:29 PM
I had some great science teachers at school (U.K. 1960-70) enthusiastic and willing to put in extra time after class for anyone interested in trying their own experiments. (Thanks guys :D )
(I learned a lot in the A Level biology class (pre university, not sure what the US equivilent is) I was the only male in a class of 8 :D :oops: :oops: :D )

beskeptical
2005-Mar-12, 06:58 PM
If you really think they may be cutting out evolution, you need to talk to Eugenie Scott. She is the country's leading fighter against creationism, and a friend of mine. She knows a lot about teaching evolution in the U.S.

Contact her through her group, the National Center for Science Education (http://www.ncseweb.org) (contact info is at the bottom of the page). If you email her, it might help to put my name in the subject line to make sure she sees it. Let her know what's going on. It may be nothing, just the way the teacher teaches, given classroom time constraints. Or there might be trouble brewing. Either way, it's best to check with her. She might have more info.

And let us know what happens!I was going to say have you asked the teacher about it as well.

Not sure what you mean by did we come from plants, but while we didn't descend from them, plants are closer to us on the evolutionary bush than would have ever been suspected before genetic research revelations.

Tree of Life (http://tolweb.org/tree/phylogeny.html)
This is an excellent web site for following where in the evolutionary scheme of things living organisms fall.

um3k
2005-Mar-12, 08:30 PM
We evolved from fungus, not plants. [-X

zebo-the-fat
2005-Mar-12, 08:31 PM
We evolved from fungus, not plants. [-X

Speak for yourself!! :D

um3k
2005-Mar-12, 08:32 PM
We evolved from fungus, not plants. [-X

Speak for yourself!! :D
Ok. I evolved from fungus, not plants.

WaxRubiks
2005-Mar-12, 08:37 PM
ME TOO.

zebo-the-fat
2005-Mar-12, 08:39 PM
Mushrooms... garlic butter... mmm! :D

WaxRubiks
2005-Mar-12, 09:13 PM
yes, how did you guess it? my name actually is Mushroom Garlicbutter.

zebo-the-fat
2005-Mar-12, 09:23 PM
:D :D

archman
2005-Mar-14, 08:09 PM
In my biology class, I think the unit on evolution has been cut out. A lot. In genetics and ecology, we went in lots and lots of detail for months at times, but in evolution, I think the standards are very small. The unit on evolution is only two weeks, and it only concerns microevolution, change in characteristics, instead of macroevolution, changes in entire species. It bugs me that in a science class, the full spectrum of biology isn't being taught.


It's impossible to cover a "full spectrum" biology class nowadays... there's FAR too much material. Lecturers have to cut and prune, often drastically. At my university, we've removed a great deal of the ecology, evolution, and taxonomy, especially taxonomy regarding plants and fungi. We still teach the concepts, but rapid advances in genetics and cell biology are competing for more lecture time than they've had in earlier days. They take up over half of our introductory textbooks now!

I would think that spending two weeks on evolution would be quite a feat for a basic biology class, that's 1/7th of one of our semesters. We split up our introductory biology into two semesters, like most schools in the U.S.. The first semester deals entirely with cell biology. The second semester blitzes through multicellular life, and squeezes in related disciplines (ecology, evolution) where it can. The largest component of that 2nd semester devotes to human biology, specifically anatomy and physiology.
And that gets "shortchanged" too!

You should have had at least a partial lecture on macroevolution however. It's interesting to the students, and there's enough material (at least throughout the Tertiary) to teach at an introductory level.