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Swift
2018-May-03, 06:15 PM
Not to detract from what Loihi may do in a few thousand years, but Kīlauea seems to be suddenly getting very active.

From Volcano National Park (https://www.nps.gov/havo/learn/news/05022018_closure.htm)

Due to the possibility of a new eruption and unstable geologic activity, park management closed 15,688 acres near Kīlauea Volcano’s Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent to the ocean today, including the gravel emergency access road from the eastern gate near Kalapana, to the western gate at the end of Chain of Craters Road, and all land on the makai (ocean) side of the emergency road.

“The recent eruption changes and increased seismicity around the East Rift Zone and Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent may threaten land and the community outside the park. The partial closure in the park is necessary to prevent unsafe travel onto lands under the jurisdiction of Hawai‘i County and to keep people safe,” said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando. “Most of the park, which is 333,308 acres in size, remains open,” she said.

On Monday afternoon, April 30, the crater within Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō collapsed, and a flurry of low magnitude earthquakes continues to shake the eastern side of the island, particularly communities in lower Puna. A small fissure opened to the west of the vent on Tuesday, May 1, but scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory report that an intrusion of magma is heading eastward from the vent towards Highway 130.

USGS as of yesterday evening (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html)

Elevated earthquake activity in Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone has persisted through the day, with many reported felt events by residents. Earthquake counts have decreased slightly since midnight in the area east of Highway 130.

Beginning this morning a GPS station located about 1.5 km (1 mile) southwest of Nanawale Estates began moving toward the north, indicating the magma intrusion is approaching this area of the East Rift Zone. The station has moved several cm (inches) since this morning.

A tiltmeter at Pu'u 'Ō'ō recorded steady, deflationary tilt during the day, with several sharp inflation offsets. These offsets probably recorded the continued episodic collapse of the crater floor. Some of these offsets corresponded to short-lived ashy plumes rising from the crater.

Tiltmeters at the summit began recording an increased deflationary tilt this afternoon. The summit lava lake level has lowered about 20 m (65 ft) since the deflationary tilt began in the early morning on May 1.

New small ground cracks less than a few cm (inches) wide developed today across a couple of roads in and adjacent to Leilani Estates; these cracks reflect the buildup of stress at the surface due to the magma intrusion. No steam or gases were observed escaping from the cracks.

Interactive earthquake map (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/hvo_earthquakes.html) showing all the activity.

Swift
2018-May-04, 01:09 PM
Activity continues to ramp up
CNN (https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/04/us/kilauea-volcano-hawaii-earthquakes/index.html)

A volcanic eruption has spewed magma from the ground in a small community on Hawaii's Big Island, sending people fleeing from their homes as molten rock burned trees and threatened more destruction.

Kilauea volcano's eastern rifts -- cracks miles away from its summit -- erupted late Thursday afternoon, spewing lava in Leilani Estates, a subdivision of about 1,700 people near the Big Island's eastern edge.
Video posted on social media showed magma spewing several feet into the air from a crack in a Leilani Estates street. Aerial videos showed lava searing a long orange and smoky line through a wooded area.
Authorities ordered residents of Leilani Estates and Lanipuna Gardens to evacuate to a community center, which is serving as a shelter.

geonuc
2018-May-04, 02:30 PM
Part of me wants to live in that area of the Big Island just to be close to volcanic activity. The other part realizes that perhaps a few more miles from the volcanic activity might be wiser.

Swift
2018-May-04, 02:52 PM
Part of me wants to live in that area of the Big Island just to be close to volcanic activity. The other part realizes that perhaps a few more miles from the volcanic activity might be wiser.
I've had the same thought, but I think if I was to actually buy a home, it would be in the western or northern parts of the Big Island, and I'd drive to see the volcano.

Gillianren
2018-May-04, 04:11 PM
It's still safer than ours?

KaiYeves
2018-May-04, 05:51 PM
Hopefully everyone can be evacuated safely and the eruption will be interesting to watch but non-threatening.

geonuc
2018-May-04, 07:03 PM
It's still safer than ours?

Depends how you define safer. Kilauea is far more likely to destroy property in the short term than Rainier, for example, and Hawaiian lava is easier to outrun. But Rainier has the far greater potential for mass destruction.

Squink
2018-May-04, 07:39 PM
Lahar map for Rainier (https://imgur.com/vdjRDRD)

Trebuchet
2018-May-05, 01:37 AM
I've had the same thought, but I think if I was to actually buy a home, it would be in the western or northern parts of the Big Island, and I'd drive to see the volcano.

I recently learned that there are not two, as I thought, but three active volcanoes on the island. Guess where the third one (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hual%C4%81lai) is? Can you say "Kona" boys and girls?


It's still safer than ours?

From a catastrophic situation? No. From near-term damage to very limited areas? Yes.

geonuc
2018-May-05, 01:37 PM
I recently learned that there are not two, as I thought, but three active volcanoes on the island. Guess where the third one (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hual%C4%81lai) is? Can you say "Kona" boys and girls?

Four actually. Five if you count Loihi just off the coast. Kilauea, Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai and Loihi. Mauna Kea hasn't erupted in quite a while, but geologically, it's still active.

geonuc
2018-May-05, 01:59 PM
Alarmingly, there was a magnitude 6.9 earthquake centered near the Kilauea rift. That's large, the largest to hit Hawaii since 1975.

https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us1000dyad#executive

geonuc
2018-May-05, 02:04 PM
This Twitter video shot from a helicopter by a Hawaii reporter also shows something alarming: an empty Pu'u O'o vent (a subsidiary caldera of Kilauea near the recent activity) where the day before it was full of lava, according to the reporter.

https://twitter.com/lynnkawano/status/992540282900987904?s=12

Trebuchet
2018-May-05, 02:30 PM
The level of the lava lake in the main crater has also dropped greatly.

Wikipedia has Mauna Kea as "dormant" rather than active. I'm not sure how they define the distinction.

geonuc
2018-May-05, 03:12 PM
Wikipedia has Mauna Kea as "dormant" rather than active. I'm not sure how they define the distinction.

The USGS has it as active.

https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/hvo_volcanoes.html

Gillianren
2018-May-05, 04:42 PM
Depends how you define safer. Kilauea is far more likely to destroy property in the short term than Rainier, for example, and Hawaiian lava is easier to outrun. But Rainier has the far greater potential for mass destruction.

You're more likely to be killed by Rainier when it goes, was what I meant.

Swift
2018-May-05, 07:47 PM
I'm not going to go chase after a link, but i saw on Facebook that Volcano National Park is now closed completely and all visitors must leave the park.

Squink
2018-May-06, 04:09 AM
Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (https://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/)

Webcams and updates.

Swift
2018-May-14, 10:45 PM
Great google mapping project (https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1CvBhH9wEeztBrqYbsGDi4YjU1k1QH5AL&ll=19.485944640323368%2C-154.86866985035704&z=13) showing location of fissures, lava flows, steam vents, road closures, etc.

On Facebook, Honolulu Civil Beat (https://www.facebook.com/pg/civilbeat/videos/?ref=page_internal) is showing a live feed from a house about a half mile or so from (I think) vent 17. Here is a link, though I'm not sure Facebook links work outside of Facebook (look under their Videos).
.

Spacedude
2018-May-15, 12:55 AM
Thx for that map Swift. The way the fissures are lining up it looks like a piece of the island is spliting off, hopefully it's not that drastic nor result in underwater landslides.

CJSF
2018-May-15, 01:02 AM
Thx for that map Swift. The way the fissures are lining up it looks like a piece of the island is spliting off, hopefully it's not that drastic nor result in underwater landslides.

The geologists I follow on Twitter say that will not and cannot happen with this kind and size eruption. As dramatic as the fissures are, they are quite small in comparison to the island, and they don't go nearly deep enough to slough off part of the coastline.

CJSF

schlaugh
2018-May-15, 01:58 AM
The geologists I follow on Twitter say that will not and cannot happen with this kind and size eruption. As dramatic as the fissures are, they are quite small in comparison to the island, and they don't go nearly deep enough to slough off part of the coastline.

CJSF

I've been thinking of the fissures as a kind of relief valve for the upwelling lava.

I'm guessing that the lava in the main caldera has't yet reached the water table, or if it has then the eruption may not have been as violent as anticipated.

In any case this may all come to an end in 100,000 years or so...once the hot spot is 10 km further southeast.

Trebuchet
2018-May-15, 05:00 AM
I'm having a bit of trouble understanding the water table concern. It will reach it by going DOWN to the water table, which means it is already there and then some. I guess that when it gets low enough more water intrusion is possible but it seems strange.

Extravoice
2018-May-15, 09:47 AM
I'm having a bit of trouble understanding the water table concern.

I was about to post the same thing. CNN had a graphic the other day, but it didn’t help explain the situation.


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CJSF
2018-May-15, 11:53 AM
I was about to post the same thing. CNN had a graphic the other day, but it didn’t help explain the situation.


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This USGS page on the 1924 eruption has a graphic about 1/2 way down that might help explain it.

https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/geo_hist_1924_halemaumau.html


CJSF

CJSF
2018-May-15, 11:55 AM
Further:


Below the water table, a conduit filled with magma keeps water out, but, once the conduit empties, groundwater can flow into the still-hot conduit, where it quickly flashes to steam. Most of the time, the steam rises up the conduit and escapes without explosion. However, the wall of the conduit, which is no longer supported by a filling of lava, collapses from time to time, temporarily impounding the steam. The steam quickly builds up pressure, and, within several minutes, overcomes the weight of the blockage and explodes the collapse debris out of the crater.

Extravoice
2018-May-15, 12:14 PM
Does ground water come in contact with magma in “normal “ times, when the conduit is full?

I guess that it would just bubble in that situation? From the graphic, it looks like the key to an explosion is a plug of rubble.


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CJSF
2018-May-15, 01:01 PM
Does ground water come in contact with magma in “normal “ times, when the conduit is full?

I guess that it would just bubble in that situation? From the graphic, it looks like the key to an explosion is a plug of rubble.


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From the USGS article, it suggests that the presence of the magma in the conduit keeps the surrounding rocks dry and the ground water at bay. It also does say that without a blockage, the water flashes to steam in the still-hot conduit, but a blockage is "needed" to build up pressures enough to blast it out.

CJSF

Selfsim
2018-May-15, 10:55 PM
This USGS page on the 1924 eruption has a graphic about 1/2 way down that might help explain it.

https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/geo_hist_1924_halemaumau.htmlIts interesting that both the buildup sequence, and the time of year of the 1924 eruptions, bear an uncanny resemblance with the behaviors over the last few weeks(?):


Though most past explosions that we know about took place during one of Kīlauea's dominantly explosive periods, the 1924 events occurred during a dominantly effusive period. This shows that explosions can be triggered by large-scale migration of magma into one of the rift zones.As per the HVO Status report (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html) of Tuesday, May 15, 2018, 9:41 AM HST, there has been a noticeable clustering of minor tremors around the Halema'umaʻu vent over the past 24 hours and steam eruptions also appear to have intensified over the same period.

Selfsim
2018-May-16, 01:39 AM
Aviation status at Kilauea ugraded to: Alert Level: WARNING, Color Code: RED (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html)2018-05-15 23:23:27 UTC (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html).


As of early this morning, eruption of ash from the Overlook vent within Halemaumau crater at Kilauea Volcano's summit has generally increased in intensity. Ash has been rising nearly continuously from the vent and drifting downwind to the southwest. Ashfall and vog (volcanic air pollution) has been reported in Pahala, about 18 miles downwind. NWS radar and pilot reports indicate the top of the ash cloud is as high as 10,000 to 12,000 feet above sea level, but this may be expected to vary depending on the vigor of activity and wind conditions.

Trebuchet
2018-May-16, 05:32 AM
That's very helpful on the water table concern, thanks.

Extravoice
2018-May-16, 10:05 AM
That's very helpful on the water table concern, thanks.

Yes, thank you.


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CJSF
2018-May-16, 05:46 PM
No problem! In an almost-life I was a geologist.

Heh.

CJSF

Trebuchet
2018-May-16, 06:24 PM
This USGS page on the 1924 eruption has a graphic about 1/2 way down that might help explain it.

https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/geo_hist_1924_halemaumau.html


CJSF

Thanks to that link, I've been looking at the other history pages on the site and have learned that there was an eruption (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/geo_hist_1955.html) very similar to the current event in 1955. Why do people keep building houses there?

Swift
2018-May-16, 06:52 PM
Why do people keep building houses there?
For the same reasons people build houses on flood plains, on barrier islands, on hillsides that are prone to wildfires and mudslides, etc., but that is probably a discussion of another thread.

KaiYeves
2018-May-16, 06:56 PM
Thanks to that link, I've been looking at the other history pages on the site and have learned that there was an eruption (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/geo_hist_1955.html) very similar to the current event in 1955. Why do people keep building houses there?

That’s true of any region prone to natural disasters, though. We could probably overlay the areas most prone to each type of hazard to find the safest possible area in the US to live, but I doubt it would hold all of the people who moved from Hawaii, Tornado Alley, California along the San Andreas Fault, Florida, etc. if they all relocated.

Trebuchet
2018-May-17, 02:34 PM
For the same reasons people build houses on flood plains, on barrier islands, on hillsides that are prone to wildfires and mudslides, etc., but that is probably a discussion of another thread.


That’s true of any region prone to natural disasters, though. We could probably overlay the areas most prone to each type of hazard to find the safest possible area in the US to live, but I doubt it would hold all of the people who moved from Hawaii, Tornado Alley, California along the San Andreas Fault, Florida, etc. if they all relocated.

Totally agree. And as far as threats to human life go, the people in those houses on Kilauea are probably at less risk than those in Orting, WA

Squink
2018-May-18, 01:58 AM
Boom. Multiple 30,000 ft ash explosions from Kilauea's peak vent.
I expect the lava lake cams have been vaporized.

schlaugh
2018-May-18, 03:33 AM
Some seem to be OK:

https://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/panorama.php?cam=KIcam

https://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/panorama.php?cam=K2cam

https://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/panorama.php?cam=KWcam

The vent overlook thermal camera hasn’t updated since early April.


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BigDon
2018-May-18, 04:37 PM
Hey, didn't the big Krakatoa event of 1883 form from a very similar situation?

VQkr
2018-May-18, 07:21 PM
Hey, didn't the big Krakatoa event of 1883 form from a very similar situation?

Not really. Kilauea is a shield volcano; Krakatoa is a stratovolcano. Different types of lava and different violence of eruptions.

https://www.universetoday.com/40601/mount-krakatoa/

BigDon
2018-May-19, 04:39 PM
Not really. Kilauea is a shield volcano; Krakatoa is a stratovolcano. Different types of lava and different violence of eruptions.

https://www.universetoday.com/40601/mount-krakatoa/

I was referring to the type of explosion, not the type of volcano. A phreatic eruption as opposed to a strombolian eruption. I was lectured on the belief the magma chamber of Krakatoa was flooded by sea water back in a geology class in the 70's.

schlaugh
2018-May-20, 02:00 AM
This aerial video was taken on Saturday, (http://bigislandnow.com/2018/05/19/aerial-views-of-fissures-and-flows/) May 19 showing significant lava flow from rift 20.

geonuc
2018-May-20, 01:16 PM
I was referring to the type of explosion, not the type of volcano. A phreatic eruption as opposed to a strombolian eruption. I was lectured on the belief the magma chamber of Krakatoa was flooded by sea water back in a geology class in the 70's.
The 1883 Krakatau eruption was plinian, not strombolian. While phreatic effects may have contributed to the overall sequence, the big eruption would have been due to a rapid buildup of pressure from degassing as fresh, hot magma was introduced into the magma chamber. That's my understanding.

BigDon
2018-May-21, 06:32 PM
The 1883 Krakatau eruption was plinian, not strombolian. While phreatic effects may have contributed to the overall sequence, the big eruption would have been due to a rapid buildup of pressure from degassing as fresh, hot magma was introduced into the magma chamber. That's my understanding.

Hmmm, should I go with a dimly remembered lesson plan from a bored, general education junior college teacher's assistant, (history class no less), from 30 years ago or with Geo's explanation?

Alright Geo, you win, this time...


:)

Squink
2018-May-21, 07:56 PM
Anyone measured how much Radon this thing is putting out?

Is emitted carbon dioxide likely to mess with CO2 readings over at Mauna Loa (https://skepticalscience.com/Measuring-CO2-levels-from-the-volcano-at-Mauna-Loa.html)?

Superluminal
2018-May-25, 07:08 AM
When I saw the headline about blue flames, I thought, wow, that lava is getting real hot. But they say its burning methane from plants. There's the possibility of an explosion. Just how big of an explosion could it be? I've never heard of a volcano burning methane before.
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/hawaii-volcano-kilauea-methane-gas-blue-flames-fear-of-explosions/

Squink
2018-May-25, 10:00 PM
Lava burning sulfur (https://duckduckgo.com/?q=lava+burning+sulfur&t=ffsb&iax=images&ia=images). Nice and blue.

BigDon
2018-May-28, 08:52 PM
Darn, Squink beat me too it.

Yeah, they're already commenting on the sulfur dioxide coming off these vents.

Yet they went with methane. Nice try though.

BigDon
2018-May-28, 08:54 PM
Oh, the wells of the geothermal plant got over run this morning. In case you missed it.

Trebuchet
2018-Jun-07, 03:27 PM
Kapoho Bay is now a peninsula. Hundreds of homes destroyed. But no loss of life -- the contrast with Fuego, a different type of volcano, could hardly be more pronounced.

BigDon
2018-Jun-07, 03:32 PM
Kapoho Bay is now a peninsula. Hundreds of homes destroyed. But no loss of life -- the contrast with Fuego, a different type of volcano, could hardly be more pronounced.

Is the main difference between the two events that the magma under Fuego is more "gassier"?

Trebuchet
2018-Jun-07, 03:47 PM
Is the main difference between the two events that the magma under Fuego is more "gassier"?

Don't know about that, but it's a shield volcano (Kilauea) vs a stratovolcano. I think it may be more that the Kilauea magma is more fluid.

Swift
2018-Jun-07, 05:16 PM
Is the main difference between the two events that the magma under Fuego is more "gassier"?
CBC's take on the differences (http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/fuego-kilauea-volcano-1.4692265)

Just as there are different types of volcanoes, there are also different types of magma — the molten rock that lies deep within Earth (it is called lava once it reaches the surface).

The magma of shield volcanoes like Kilauea has lower viscosity, meaning it's runnier.

Volcanologist Einat Lev of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in New York uses a ketchup and tomato paste analogy to explain the difference between the magma found in Kilauea and the Volcano of Fire.

"If you try to make a pile of tomato paste, it will stand still," she said. "But if you try to make a pile of ketchup, it will spread."

All active volcanoes produce gases that have the ability to accumulate.

Going back to the ketchup and tomato paste analogy, imagine gas that is unable to get through the thick magma. If you were to take a straw and blow, you'd need more force to get that bubble to erupt.

Because the magma is less viscous in Kilauea, the gases produced have an easier time escaping.

But in the Volcano of Fire, gases are put under enormous pressure and can erupt in violent, sometimes surprising explosions.

"If you're trying to blow bubbles through ketchup or through tomato paste, with one [the ketchup], the bubble would go through, but with the tomato paste, it would kind of blow the whole thing apart," said Lev, who was on the ground in Hawaii studying Kilauea two weeks ago. "It's the bubbles that drive how big those explosions are going to be."

BigDon
2018-Jun-07, 05:53 PM
So I wasn't that far off the mark.

Thanks Swift. (And Treb.)

geonuc
2018-Jun-08, 03:04 PM
Although 'gassiness' is a substatial factor, the explosivity of magma has more to do with the viscosity, which is mainly influenced by silica content. Basaltic magmas, such as that underlying shield volcanoes like Kilauea, have a higher SiO2 content than do andesitic and rhyolitic magma, which underlie subduction-related volcanoes, such as those in the Pacific Ring of Fire.

http://www.geology.sdsu.edu/how_volcanoes_work/Controls.html

Selfsim
2018-Jun-08, 10:39 PM
Apologies for going back aways, but I'd like to repost the below link .. I've found it to be really helpful and very informative.

Thanks, Swift ... and complements to those who created it, (wherever you are).

The clickable site-specific images are really a great addition also!:

Great google mapping project (https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1CvBhH9wEeztBrqYbsGDi4YjU1k1QH5AL&ll=19.485944640323368%2C-154.86866985035704&z=13) showing location of fissures, lava flows, steam vents, road closures, etc.

Trebuchet
2018-Jun-09, 12:22 AM
Is it possible to drive from Hilo to Kona these days? My recollection is that the road between Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea was considered very rough.

Selfsim
2018-Jun-09, 12:54 AM
Is it possible to drive from Hilo to Kona these days? My recollection is that the road between Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea was considered very rough.Yes .. (at least it was when I drove it several times about 2 years ago). Super spectacular and you can also drive up to the Observatory visitor's center at Mauna Kea along the way.

Gillianren
2018-Jun-09, 04:49 PM
It might have changed since then.

Trebuchet
2018-Jun-09, 06:40 PM
It was the early '80's when we were there, so yeah. My recollection is that the car rental companies forbid taking them up there.

Selfsim
2018-Jun-09, 09:38 PM
It was the early '80's when we were there, so yeah. My recollection is that the car rental companies forbid taking them up there.Ours was a standard 2 wheel drive rental vehicle hired from Hilo airport. The road was in excellent condition .. fully sealed (etc).
There doesn't seem to have been any volcanic intrusions or quakes along that route since then (its all seems pretty stable in that direction).

Trebuchet
2018-Jun-10, 09:03 PM
From Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawaii_Route_200):

Route 200, known locally as Saddle Road, traverses the width of the Island of Hawaiʻi, from downtown Hilo to its junction with Hawaii Route 190 near Waimea. The road was considered one of the most dangerous paved roads in the state, with many one-lane bridges and areas of marginally maintained pavement. Most of the road has now been repaved, and major parts have new re-alignments to modern standards. The highway reaches a maximum elevation of 6,632 feet (2,021 m) and is subject to fog and low visibility. Many rental car companies used to prohibit use of their cars on Saddle Road, but now allow use of the road. The highway experiences heavy use as it provides the shortest driving route from Hilo to Kailua-Kona and access to the slopes of Mauna Loa and the Mauna Kea Observatories.Apologies for the digression. There's also a road around the coast to the northwest, it appears.

Back on topic, the Hale Ma'uMa'u crater has undergone dramatic changes in the past few days, with the walls caving in.

Selfsim
2018-Jun-10, 09:40 PM
There's some really neat images and relatively recent info on the caldera changes here (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html).
There's also a hi-def video of summit fly-overs conducted from June 5th showing what's been going on (takes forever to load, however).

PS: Probably not: but there looks to be a set of footprints leading right up to the rim, too! :)

publiusr
2018-Jun-23, 07:11 PM
The 1883 Krakatau eruption was plinian, not strombolian. While phreatic effects may have contributed to the overall sequence, the big eruption would have been due to a rapid buildup of pressure from degassing as fresh, hot magma was introduced into the magma chamber. That's my understanding.

Then what about something like another Diamond Head?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honolulu_Volcanic_Series

There is a part of me that wonders if this might be the last gasp of the 83' eruption, with everything becoming more quiet as the big island moves off the hot spot--or is that jumping the gun a little?

Trebuchet
2018-Jun-24, 01:07 AM
I'd suspect it's jumping the gun a lot. Geologic time is almost inconceivable to human minds. That's why we've got so many creationists.

But thanks for the reminder to go look at the HVO site, I haven't since yesterday.

schlaugh
2018-Jun-24, 01:24 AM
Then what about something like another Diamond Head?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honolulu_Volcanic_Series

There is a part of me that wonders if this might be the last gasp of the 83' eruption, with everything becoming more quiet as the big island moves off the hot spot--or is that jumping the gun a little?

Well, since the Pacific Plate is chugging away at 5 to 10 CM a year, it might be a bit too soon. :)


Hawaiian volcanoes drift northwest from the hotspot at a rate of about 5–10 centimeters (2.0–3.9 in) a year.[18] The hotspot has migrated south by about 800 kilometers (497 mi) relative to the Emperor chain.[23] Paleomagnetic studies support this conclusion based on changes in Earth's magnetic field, a picture of which was engrained in the rocks at the time of their solidification,[45] showing that these seamounts formed at higher latitudes than present-day Hawaii. Prior to the bend, the hotspot migrated an estimated 7 centimeters (2.8 in) per year; the rate of movement changed at the time of the bend to about 9 centimeters (3.5 in) per year.[23] The Ocean Drilling Program provided most of the current knowledge about the drift. The 2001[46] expedition drilled six seamounts and tested the samples to determine their original latitude, and thus the characteristics and speed of the hotspot's drift pattern in total.[47]

Each successive volcano spends less time actively attached to the plume. The large difference between the youngest and oldest lavas between Emperor and Hawaiian volcanoes indicates that the hotspot's velocity is increasing. For example, Kohala, the oldest volcano on Hawaii island, is one million years old and last erupted 120,000 years ago, a period of just under 900,000 years; whereas one of the oldest, Detroit Seamount, experienced 18 million or more years of volcanic activity.[21]


The oldest volcano in the chain, Meiji Seamount, perched on the edge of the Aleutian Trench, formed 85 million years ago.[48] At its current velocity, the seamount will be destroyed within a few million years, as the Pacific Plate slides under the Eurasian Plate. It is unknown whether the seamount chain has been subducting under the Eurasian Plate, and whether the hotspot is older than Meiji Seamount, as any older seamounts have since been destroyed by the plate margin. It is also possible that a collision near the Aleutian Trench had changed the velocity of the Pacific Plate, explaining the hotspot chain's bend; the relationship between these features is still being investigated.[23][49]

Swift
2018-Jun-25, 12:36 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fjVp7UJhSk
A video from KHON-TV from a couple of days ago on the current state of Volcano National Park.

Made me a little sad; the ranger mentioned that some things may never open again. My understanding from other reports is that some of the roadway around the caldera has collapsed into the caldera.

schlaugh
2018-Jul-04, 04:43 PM
A nice overview and summation video (https://www.nps.gov/media/video/view.htm?id=28004755-1DD8-B71B-0BBDE0DA6FFA45FD) from the National Park Service on the most current eruption.

Trebuchet
2018-Jul-04, 11:29 PM
I've been wondering at what point the "Fissure 8" cone will merit its own name. It's 55m/180 feet tall, according to USGS.

CJSF
2018-Jul-05, 02:55 AM
I've been wondering at what point the "Fissure 8" cone will merit its own name. It's 55m/180 feet tall, according to USGS.

USGS has said repeatedly (via news conferences, phone calls, and video updates) that it will probably get a name, but they are too busy with everything else to worry about that right now.

CJSF

Swift
2018-Jul-05, 01:21 PM
How about Coney McConeface? :p

Trebuchet
2018-Jul-06, 01:10 AM
USGS has said repeatedly (via news conferences, phone calls, and video updates) that it will probably get a name, but they are too busy with everything else to worry about that right now.

CJSF


How about Coney McConeface? :p

Pu'u McPu'uface?

Got to be Pu'u something, I'd think.

Squink
2018-Jul-07, 05:35 PM
In the United Kingdom, a land mass must have an identifiable summit and be more than 984 feet (https://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-minimum-height-of-a-mountain.htm) (300 m) in height for it to be considered a mountain.

I expect that in Hawaii, it'll at least have to clear the general hill size in the area. 55 meters is still a bump. Cinder cones easily get taller.
Pu'u McPu'uface is good, if and when it's needed.

CJSF
2018-Jul-08, 01:51 AM
I expect that in Hawaii, it'll at least have to clear the general hill size in the area. 55 meters is still a bump. Cinder cones easily get taller.
Pu'u McPu'uface is good, if and when it's needed.

In this case it's not about naming a new mountain, but giving vents and cones names if they persist, as is the usual custom there.

CJSF

wd40
2018-Jul-08, 01:59 AM
There was a fear at the time of the BP Gulf of Mexico oil leak that if it could not be plugged that it could go on for decades, and become an ELE. If this Kilauea continues spewing lava at this rate for decades, could it have any major effect on the environment and life, locally or far away?

Trebuchet
2018-Jul-08, 03:17 AM
In the United Kingdom, a land mass must have an identifiable summit and be more than 984 feet (https://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-minimum-height-of-a-mountain.htm) (300 m) in height for it to be considered a mountain.
They made a whole movie about that (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Englishman_who_Went_up_a_Hill_but_Came_down_a_ Mountain), except it was 1000 feet then. My former boss grew up where they filmed it.

Squink
2018-Jul-08, 06:33 PM
Good movie. It's what caused me to look up the current Brit definition.

Swift
2018-Jul-09, 12:45 PM
There was a fear at the time of the BP Gulf of Mexico oil leak that if it could not be plugged that it could go on for decades, and become an ELE.
An Extinction Level Event for the entire Earth? I don't recall any such thing.


If this Kilauea continues spewing lava at this rate for decades, could it have any major effect on the environment and life, locally or far away?
Kilauea has been erupting continuously since 1983; why would it suddenly have non-local effects? Of course it has local effects, but the effects don't even seem to impact the entire island of Hawaii, let alone anything further away.

CJSF
2018-Jul-09, 06:13 PM
The only reason why Kilauea is in the news to the extent all this apocalyptic nonsense is being broadcast around is because the current phase opened up in a (relatively) denser population area (Leilani Estates) and then inundated a bunch of luxury vacation properties. Otherwise this is business as usual for Kilauea. It's interesting and only still (barely) cool to watch from afar because very few people have had serious injury. Of course the property loss is nothing to make light of either.

CJSF

Swift
2018-Jul-10, 01:11 PM
I will make one note... a lot of the homes destroyed were not "luxury vacation properties". They were people's primary homes and I think a lot of them were rather modest. My understanding was that this area was one of the more reasonably priced areas on the island, and I think a lot of that was because it was in the area of some past lava flows.

Trebuchet
2018-Jul-10, 04:03 PM
The luxury ones would have been around the former Kapoho bay, which is now more of a peninsula.

Gillianren
2018-Jul-10, 04:30 PM
One of Simon's godmothers has lived in Pahoa off and on her entire life, and it's definitely not exclusively a wealthy area. Parts of it are very poor. It's my understanding that the school was seriously threatened a while back, though I don't know what came of that.

Trebuchet
2018-Jul-10, 06:13 PM
Here's the old Pahoa thread (https://forum.cosmoquest.org/showthread.php?154103-Lava-flow-threatens-Pahoa-HI). Ultimately very little damage in that event, although the whole town was threatened for a long time. Just one home destroyed, IIRC.

CJSF
2018-Jul-11, 12:39 AM
I will make one note... a lot of the homes destroyed were not "luxury vacation properties". They were people's primary homes and I think a lot of them were rather modest. My understanding was that this area was one of the more reasonably priced areas on the island, and I think a lot of that was because it was in the area of some past lava flows.

Sorry if I wasn't clear on that point. Leilani Estates is a middle-lower income area. The higher-end properties were in Vacationland (near the no longer extant Kapoho Bay), if I interpreted the video updates properly over the last month or so.

CJSF

Selfsim
2018-Jul-11, 09:31 AM
What I'd like to know, (if answerable), is whether the now mostly devoid of magma, Halemaʻumaʻu caldera, can ever refill once again?

If the magma 'streams' from the fissures can solidify all the way from the coastal outfalls back to the fissure(s), then can the fissure(s), themselves, also seal over and force the fluid magma to well up all the way back to the main caldera? I guess if the subsurface magma reservoir outflows and pressures ever subside enough for the ocean outfalls to solidify again, then the caldera could again refill .. however, this would now seem unlikely, and fissure 8 may end up being be Pele's new residence .. (or maybe her retirement home?)

And what about Puʻu ʻŌʻō? I think its level has dropped during this event as well. What's going to happen there?

wd40
2018-Jul-11, 12:41 PM
An Extinction Level Event for the entire Earth? I don't recall any such thing.

During the 2010 leak some claimed that the volume and pressure of the Gulf field are such that it may be have been incapable of being capped, and could have leaked for decades, destroying the Atlantic Ocean. Surface tension would prevent fish and sea life from reaching the surface, and the ocean would eventually become a 'dead zone'. Covered with an oily film, the seas would not be able to evaporate to form clouds, reducing rainfall. Any rain that did fall would be contaminated with toxic benzene, toluene, phenol and methylene chloride, with disastrous results on crops, animals and humans. In 1903 the Austrian writer Gustav Meyrink wrote a book called "Petroleum, Petroleum" about a massive oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico eventually covering all of the Earth’s oceans, causing rain to cease falling and the collapse of humanity.




Kilauea has been erupting continuously since 1983; why would it suddenly have non-local effects? Of course it has local effects, but the effects don't even seem to impact the entire island of Hawaii, let alone anything further away.


Presumably in the Earth's past lava flowed from scores of volcanoes and fissures for aeons. Is there any scenario whereby the current Hawaiian event could naturally gain access to inexhaustible magma flowing and producing toxic gases also for aeons, and with what result on life, if any? (cf the most frightening of the Dr Who series, "Inferno").

Swift
2018-Jul-11, 01:13 PM
During the 2010 leak some claimed that the volume and pressure of the Gulf field are such that it may be have been incapable of being capped, and could have leaked for decades, destroying the Atlantic Ocean. Surface tension would prevent fish and sea life from reaching the surface, and the ocean would eventually become a 'dead zone'. Covered with an oily film, the seas would not be able to evaporate to form clouds, reducing rainfall. Any rain that did fall would be contaminated with toxic benzene, toluene, phenol and methylene chloride, with disastrous results on crops, animals and humans. In 1903 the Austrian writer Gustav Meyrink wrote a book called "Petroleum, Petroleum" about a massive oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico eventually covering all of the Earth’s oceans, causing rain to cease falling and the collapse of humanity.

OK, now I'm going to put my moderator hat on - this is off topic for this thread. If you want to discuss this, start a new thread.

geonuc
2018-Jul-11, 01:16 PM
Presumably in the Earth's past lava flowed from scores of volcanoes and fissures for aeons. Is there any scenario whereby the current Hawaiian flow could naturally gain access to inexhaustible magma flowing and producing toxic gases also for aeons, and with what result on life, if any? (cf the most frightening of the Dr Who series, "Inferno").

There are many examples of massive lava flows on Earth - the geologic term is Large Igneous Province (LIP), or flood basalt (if the lava is basaltic, which most is). You may be using the the term aeon informally, but these LIP's did not last for geologic eons. More like a few millions of years or considerably less. Some of the LIPs are considered to have contributed to mass extinctions. The Deccan Traps and Siberian Traps, for example.

As to whether the Hawaiian hotspot, which has been producing lava for something less than 100 million years, can turn into a LIP, that's speculative at best. Other LIPs were formed (we think) from hot spot activity driven by mantle plumes, as is the Hawaiian hotspot. I'm no expert but I'd think that if the Hawaiian hotspot were to become a flood basalt, it would have done so by now.

BigDon
2018-Jul-11, 04:25 PM
There are many examples of massive lava flows on Earth - the geologic term is Large Igneous Province (LIP), or flood basalt (if the lava is basaltic, which most is). You may be using the the term aeon informally, but these LIP's did not last for geologic eons. More like a few millions of years or considerably less. Some of the LIPs are considered to have contributed to mass extinctions. The Deccan Traps and Siberian Traps, for example.As to whether the Hawaiian hotspot, which has been producing lava for something less than 100 million years, can turn into a LIP, that's speculative at best. Other LIPs were formed (we think) from hot spot activity driven by mantle plumes, as is the Hawaiian hotspot. I'm no expert but I'd think that if the Hawaiian hotspot were to become a flood basalt, it would have done so by now.

When the Deccan traps were being laid down there was the equivalent of a Mount St. Helen's explosion every week for a *million* years.

The Siberian traps were worse.

And somehow we still like to think we're the worst thing that's ever happened to the Earth.

Trebuchet
2018-Jul-11, 07:15 PM
What I'd like to know, (if answerable), is whether the now mostly devoid of magma, Halemaʻumaʻu caldera, can ever refill once again?

If the magma 'streams' from the fissures can solidify all the way from the coastal outfalls back to the fissure(s), then can the fissure(s), themselves, also seal over and force the fluid magma to well up all the way back to the main caldera? I guess if the subsurface magma reservoir outflows and pressures ever subside enough for the ocean outfalls to solidify again, then the caldera could again refill .. however, this would now seem unlikely, and fissure 8 may end up being be Pele's new residence .. (or maybe her retirement home?)

And what about Puʻu ʻŌʻō? I think its level has dropped during this event as well. What's going to happen there?

"Ever" is a really long time. I'd think it might not take that long at all. The current east rift zone event is nothing new -- similar events have occurred many times, including the Kapoho eruption of 1960. The eruption map (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/maps_uploads/image-508.jpg) also shows flows right in this area from 1955. Eventually the underground plumbing will clog, or the lava supply will be reduced, and this event will come to an end. I'd guess (and IANAG) this will probably happen before the end of this year. Activity will then return (eventually) to the summit and/or Pu'u O'o.

CJSF
2018-Jul-12, 02:42 AM
Given what "we" know about the structure and eruptive history of Kilauea, there's a very good chance that magma will return to the caldera and Halemaʻumaʻu crater. At some point the dynamics or cycles that drive the rift eruptions will shift, stopping the flow of magma into the fissures. Even with the crater filling in with the various summit collapses, that part of the volcano represents a "weak" area that the repressurized magma can move back into and begin the process again. It might be worth it to look up the histories (native and European) of Kilauea to get a sense of how "normal" this event is, and how often magma has retreated and returned to the summit.

CJSF

Trebuchet
2018-Jul-12, 11:22 PM
What I'd like to know, (if answerable), is whether the now mostly devoid of magma, Halemaʻumaʻu caldera, can ever refill once again?

If the magma 'streams' from the fissures can solidify all the way from the coastal outfalls back to the fissure(s), then can the fissure(s), themselves, also seal over and force the fluid magma to well up all the way back to the main caldera? I guess if the subsurface magma reservoir outflows and pressures ever subside enough for the ocean outfalls to solidify again, then the caldera could again refill .. however, this would now seem unlikely, and fissure 8 may end up being be Pele's new residence .. (or maybe her retirement home?)

And what about Puʻu ʻŌʻō? I think its level has dropped during this event as well. What's going to happen there?


"Ever" is a really long time. I'd think it might not take that long at all. The current east rift zone event is nothing new -- similar events have occurred many times, including the Kapoho eruption of 1960. The eruption map (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/maps_uploads/image-508.jpg) also shows flows right in this area from 1955. Eventually the underground plumbing will clog, or the lava supply will be reduced, and this event will come to an end. I'd guess (and IANAG) this will probably happen before the end of this year. Activity will then return (eventually) to the summit and/or Pu'u O'o.

And here's a USGS page (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/geo_hist_1924_halemaumau.html) about a similar collapse/explosive event in 1924. And the top "geology and history (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/geo_hist_summary.html)" page showing almost the entire surface of the east corner of the island to be less than 1000 years old. It's cyclical, and will continue to be for a long time.

Selfsim
2018-Jul-13, 12:15 AM
And here's a USGS page (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/geo_hist_1924_halemaumau.html) about a similar collapse/explosive event in 1924. And the top "geology and history (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/geo_hist_summary.html)" page showing almost the entire surface of the east corner of the island to be less than 1000 years old. It's cyclical, and will continue to be for a long time.Ya .. thanks. And thanks to CJSF, too. Much appreciated. :)
I was reading up on that last night and watching some documentaries on the history of it all.
I suppose if its all so regular/predictable and rather 'business as usual' then one has to wonder why they allowed building major housing estates in the already known rift zones .. more a rhetorical question here .. (and posed numerous times here also I notice) .. but is also one posed frequently in the documentaries.

Anyway, if the caldera level continues to drop (due to fissure 8 discharge) then it seems it may enter the explosive phase again. (This is apparently expected 'imminently' in geological times).
Is anyone measuring the magma levels in the caldera? I've seen the satellite photos, but I haven't found any 'dipstick' measurements online. (Perhaps the 'dipper' fried whilst doing their job and they need a replacement? :) )
I guess they rely on the summit (and flank) deformation data for that, but it indicates more the shift in subterrranian magma, rather than the actual depth in the caldera (the latter of which is the key measurement for predicting a sustained explosive phase?)

Trebuchet
2018-Jul-13, 12:43 AM
... then one has to wonder why they allowed building major housing estates in the already known rift zones .. more a rhetorical question here .. (and posed numerous times here also I notice) .. but is also one posed frequently in the documentaries.
Yup. Private property rights are held rather sacred in the USA. That doesn't mean insurance companies have to issue policies, of course. In my part of the world, people keep building houses in flood plains, and worse, like the lahar zone of Orting, WA. It's not a question of IF Orting will be covered by feet of steaming mud, just when.

Gillianren
2018-Jul-13, 04:35 PM
Though of course if people only lived somewhere geologically stable, with no danger of flood, hurricane, tsunami, or tornado, it would start severely limiting where humans could live. Which is not to say I'd move to Orting.

Trebuchet
2018-Jul-13, 06:39 PM
Indeed. One of these days the Cascadia Subduction Zone is going to slip.

Selfsim
2018-Jul-16, 09:00 PM
Lava flies through roof of Hawaii tour boat, injuring 13 (https://www.cnbc.com/2018/07/16/the-associated-press-lava-flies-through-roof-of-hawaii-tour-boat-injuring-13.html):


A 20-year-old woman suffered major leg trauma, and other passengers had burns and scrapes, the state Department of Land and Natural Resources said.
The people were aboard a tour boat that takes visitors to see lava plunging into the ocean from a volcano that has been erupting for two months. Several companies operate such tours.

schlaugh
2018-Jul-16, 10:39 PM
This is the explosion that apparently caused the damage to the boat and the associated injuries. The video was taken from another boat.

https://youtu.be/tAFML5DILM0

Selfsim
2018-Jul-17, 12:27 AM
This is the explosion that apparently caused the damage to the boat and the associated injuries. The video was taken from another boat.

https://youtu.be/tAFML5DILM0Wow!

Steam explosion? Looks like maybe some kind of 'plug' gave way and let a whole lot of hotter liquid lava loose? Maybe triggered by a cliff collapse or something?

Selfsim
2018-Jul-17, 01:41 AM
Howz this for a 'hole-in one'?:

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/07/16/lava-flies-through-roof-hawaii-tour-boat-injuring-13.html

Swift
2018-Jul-23, 06:40 PM
Continuing summit earthquakes are causing highway damage.

LINK (http://bigislandnow.com/2018/07/23/5-am-5-3-m-collapse-event-damages-highway-11/)


State Highways reports that the 5.3-magnitude collapse event which occurred at 8:54 p.m. has caused additional damage to Highway 11 between the 28 and 32 Mile Markers near Volcano.

Motorists are urged to drive with extreme caution in the area.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports a collapse event with energy equal to a 5.3 magnitude earthquake has occurred at Halema‘uma‘u Crater at 8:54 p.m. on July 22.

For those not familiar with this, highway 11 is the main highway from Hilo to the the West side of the island, along the southern half and through Volcano National Park.

Trebuchet
2018-Jul-29, 03:31 PM
It's been pretty boring lately, with each days status report (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html) pretty much a carbon copy of the one before -- fissure 8 still feeding lava into the ocean, another collapse event at the summit. Eventually fissure eight will slow down and stop and then we'll see what happens at the summit. For now, however, it just keeps on keeping on.

Squink
2018-Jul-30, 01:59 AM
Fissure eight will grow and accept all magma from former summit.
Kilauea will go extinct, and we'll have to find a new name for growing mountain at fissure eight.
They'll have to shift park boundaries at enormous expense.
Magma McMagmaface will not be accepted as name for new volcano.
Perhaps "Suburb's doom"?

CJSF
2018-Jul-30, 04:03 AM
Fissure eight will grow and accept all magma from former summit.
Kilauea will go extinct, and we'll have to find a new name for growing mountain at fissure eight.
They'll have to shift park boundaries at enormous expense.
Magma McMagmaface will not be accepted as name for new volcano.
Perhaps "Suburb's doom"?

There is literally no evidence this will or can happen. At all.

CJSF

Trebuchet
2018-Jul-30, 05:09 AM
There is literally no evidence this will or can happen. At all.

CJSF

And the evidence of the dozens of old craters along the east rift zone confirms that. This current event is something that has happened over and over through the past several thousand years. It is, however rift eruptions that have been contributing most to the growth of the island.

Squink
2018-Jul-30, 06:59 PM
New things, such as the breakup of Gondwana, do occasionally happen.
Trebuchet, is likely correct, but we cannot know until whatever happens, happens.
Hawaii does after all consist of a string of islands.

Tom Mazanec
2018-Aug-01, 03:17 PM
Isn't the next island supposed to be Loihi?

Trebuchet
2018-Aug-01, 08:25 PM
Yes, but we won't see it in our lifetimes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C5%8D%CA%BBihi_Seamount

Trebuchet
2018-Aug-05, 10:09 PM
Things have quieted down the past couple of days, with lower lava output from fissure 8 and less seismic activity at the summit. However, as noted by USGS:

Summit and LERZ changes considered together imply that the rate of magma leaving the summit to feed the Lower East Rift Zone eruption has decreased. How long this condition will persist is unknown. It is possible that outflow will pick up again, resulting in renewed summit area deflation leading to another collapse event and renewed eruption vigor on the LERZ.

Swift
2018-Aug-16, 12:03 AM
Things continue to be quieter

nps.gov (https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm)

Wednesday, August 15, 2018, 12:42 PM HST

Kīlauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

Kīlauea Volcano has remained quiet for well over a week now, with no further collapse events at the summit, and, with the exception of a small, crusted-over pond of lava deep inside the fissure 8 cone and a few scattered ocean entries, no lava flowing in the lower East Rift Zone (LERZ).

Earthquake and deformation data show no net accumulation, withdrawal, or significant movement of subsurface magma or pressurization as would be expected if the system was building toward a resumption of activity.

It is too soon to tell if this change represents a temporary lull or the end of the LERZ eruption and/or summit collapse activity. In 1955, similar pauses of 5 and 16 days occurred during an 88-day-long LERZ eruption. During the Mauna Ulu eruption (1969-1974), a 3.5 month pause occurred in late 1971.

Squink
2018-Aug-19, 02:28 AM
Nothing new, August 18: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html

Swift
2018-Aug-20, 06:21 PM
Civil Defense seems to be lowering their response level (http://bigislandnow.com/2018/08/16/civil-defense-announces-last-kilauea-update-unless-activity-changes/)

The Hawai‘i County Civil Defense reports that Hawaiian Volcano Observatory states that activity on the lower east rift zone of Kīlauea Volcano has diminished and remained quiet for over a week. The only surface activity is a small, crusted lava pond inside the Fissure 8 cone, and a few areas along the coast where lava is entering the ocean. Sulfur dioxide emission rates are also drastically reduced. While eruptive activity is minimal at this time, hazards remain.

It is common for eruptions to go through periods of diminished output, or to pause completely, only to reactivate days, weeks, or even months later. Re-activation could occur at any time, with little to no warning. Residents should remain informed and heed Hawai‘i County Civil Defense messages and warnings. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory will continue to release daily status updates, found here.

...

Civil Defense continues to monitor the situation. However, this will is there final daily Kīlauea Eruption Update unless activity significantly changes.

Swift
2018-Aug-20, 09:06 PM
Short article about the National Park's recovery (http://bigislandnow.com/2018/08/17/hvnp-taking-steps-towards-park-recovery/)


Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park reports that although it’s been more than two weeks since the summit area of Kīlauea was rocked by dangerous earthquakes and collapse-explosion events, the damage inflicted upon roads, trails and infrastructure in the park will take time to evaluate and repair.

The park is taking advantage of the lull in hazardous conditions to assemble a specialized team that will conduct thorough damage assessments and become the foundation of the park’s recovery plan.

“The science informs the decisions we make,” said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando. “We have entered the phase of managing the park as if the hazards could return at any time, while maintaining hope that the lull in activity lasts so we can continue the momentum towards eventual reopening,” she said. “We are actively considering and making short-term repairs to safely reopen at least part of the park.”
Includes a couple of photos of damage.

Trebuchet
2018-Sep-24, 02:26 PM
Bump! Because it's been about a month, during which nothing much has happened. Today's report:

On Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), no incandescence was visible overnight in the collapse pit within the fissure 8 cone. Minor fuming is visible during the day. Seismicity and ground deformation remain low at the summit of Kīlauea. Small aftershocks from the magnitude-6.9 earthquake in early May are still being generated on faults located on Kīlauea's South Flank.


No collapses within Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater have been observed since September 14. Rates of tilting throughout the East Rift Zone are much lower than those observed during the period of major eruptive activity. There has been no change in seismicity during the past week.


Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates at the summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate is less than 1,000 tonnes/day, which is lower than at any time since late 2007. SO2 emission rates from LERZ vents were below the detection threshold of the measurement technique when last measured on September 11. Minor amounts of H2S are being emitted at the summit and at Puʻu ʻŌʻō.


The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea's seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ. HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed.

is virtually identical to the past week.

There are some very good drone videos up in the Multimedia section (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html). I like this one (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/multimedia_uploads/multimediaFile-2623.mp4). I keep having to remind myself that that is the middle of a residential subdivision.

ETA: Oops, that wasn't the video I meant to link. This one (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/multimedia_uploads/multimediaFile-2627.mp4) is better.

Swift
2018-Sep-24, 04:52 PM
Bump! Because it's been about a month, during which nothing much has happened.
One thing happened: the park reopened this past Saturday (https://www.nps.gov/havo/2018-closure.htm).

CJSF
2018-Sep-24, 08:19 PM
I had said to myself when they announced the eruption was likely to go on for months that it would end within a week or two. I had sort of anticipated it anyway, as the areal coverage of the lava seemed to reach similar extents to the others in that area (i.e., the 1840, 1955, and 1960 eruptions). I figured these eruptions likely extract a similar amount of lava, perhaps at varying rates. It could also be coincidence. Either way, I hope they were wrong with that original assessment and we don't get hundreds of park guests or area residents trapped.

CJSF

Squink
2018-Sep-25, 04:58 AM
Kiluauea summit appears much changed.
East rift zone has a nice new cone.
Pix and vids here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Trebuchet
2018-Sep-25, 02:57 PM
Kiluauea summit appears much changed.
East rift zone has a nice new cone.
Pix and vids here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Yes, that's the same site I linked above. I was visiting every day when things were more active.

A lot of people have also lost their homes.

Squink
2018-Sep-26, 06:43 PM
Massive change.
I doubt the homes will be back.
Looks like the lava pool at summit is gone as well.
Of course no one is going down there just now to place a camera.
Even the drone vid shys away from the inner crater.

Trebuchet
2018-Sep-26, 08:37 PM
Both the summit crater and Pu'u O'o have drained down, with the summit crater being hundreds of feet deep. It may take a couple of years for the hotspot to recharge the system.

Trebuchet
2018-Sep-30, 07:17 PM
Human impact: Stunning before and after satellite views of the eruption area covering homes in the Multimedia Section (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html), posted Sept 28.

Trebuchet
2018-Oct-09, 05:54 PM
USGS has downgraded Kilauea's alert status (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html) from orange to yellow for both aviation and otherwise due to now significant activity for thirty days. They also note this:

This change in activity marks the first time since 1986 that lava has not been active at Kīlauea's surface for a period of 30 or more days (The last long pause was 48.5 days between episodes 39 and 40 of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō eruption.) In the past 200 years, the volcano has experienced periods of quiet ranging from months to years with no eruptive activity. However, Kīlauea is one of the most active volcanoes in the world, and additional eruptions will occur.

Trebuchet
2018-Oct-30, 03:02 AM
From the HVO site: "Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting." They haven't been able to say that in more than 30 years. But there's an inflationary trend.

geonuc
2018-Oct-30, 12:46 PM
From the HVO site: "Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting." They haven't been able to say that in more than 30 years. But there's an inflationary trend.

To paraphrase Arnold, "She'll be back."

publiusr
2018-Nov-05, 09:05 PM
So will this be considered the end of the 1983 eruption?

Trebuchet
2018-Nov-06, 07:39 PM
So will this be considered the end of the 1983 eruption?
Probably not, unless the period of inactivity goes on for a year or two. I'd bet it won't. It's recharging.

Trebuchet
2018-Dec-05, 03:50 PM
So will this be considered the end of the 1983 eruption?


Probably not, unless the period of inactivity goes on for a year or two. I'd bet it won't. It's recharging.

On the other hand.... (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html)

September 4 was the last time active lava was observed along the LERZ; tomorrow (December 5) will mark three months with no eruptive activity at the surface. According to the Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program (https://volcano.si.edu/), volcanoes with no eruptive activity over a three-month period are no longer classified as having a "continuing" eruption. Based on this Global Volcanism Program criterion, the LERZ eruption could be considered to be over. However, there is one known example (Mauna Ulu, 1969-74) in which Kilauea's rift zone activity resumed after more than three months had passed. Although this phase of Kīlauea's activity has now reached this three-month threshold, it is important to note that it is still an active volcano that could erupt in the near future and associated hazards have not changed. Magma is being supplied to Kīlauea and geophysical datasets continue to show evidence for movement of material through the magma system, including the refilling of the ERZ.

(Link is to the update page which gets updated. I don't see how to get one for a specific daily report.)

Roger E. Moore
2018-Dec-14, 02:12 PM
New report on magnitude of the activity there...

https://phys.org/news/2018-12-kilauea-eruption-unprecedented.html

Data from Kilauea suggests the eruption was unprecedented
December 14, 2018 by Bob Yirka, Phys.org

A very large team of researchers from multiple institutions in the U.S. has concluded that the Kilauea volcanic eruption that occurred over this past summer represented an unprecedented volcanic event. In their paper published in the journal Science, the researchers describe the sequence of events that transpired and what set them apart from other volcanic eruptions. Kilauea, a volcano on Hawaii's big island underwent a long, drawn-out eruption over this past summer. It made headlines due to the spread of lava that destroyed many homes and changed some of the island's landscape. And it is now making news again as data from the eruption reveals that it erupted in ways that have not been seen before.


original paper:
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2018/12/10/science.aav7046

The 2018 rift eruption and summit collapse of Kīlauea Volcano
C. A. Neal, et al.; Science 11 Dec 2018: DOI: 10.1126/science.aav7046

In 2018, Kīlauea Volcano experienced its largest lower East Rift Zone (LERZ) eruption and caldera collapse in at least 200 years. After collapse of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent on 30 April, magma propagated downrift. Eruptive fissures opened in the LERZ on 3 May, eventually extending ~6.8 km. A 4 May earthquake (M6.9) produced ~5 m of fault slip. Lava erupted at rates exceeding 100 m3/s, eventually covering 35.5 km2. The summit magma system partially drained, producing minor explosions and near-daily collapses releasing energy equivalent to M4.7-M5.4 earthquakes. Activity declined rapidly on 4 August. Summit collapse and lava flow volume estimates are roughly equivalent—about 0.8 km3. Careful historical observation and monitoring of Kīlauea enabled successful forecasting of hazardous events.

Trebuchet
2019-Feb-21, 06:21 PM
I really miss the daily eruption updates. Is that weird?

Squink
2019-Feb-21, 08:52 PM
I really miss the daily eruption updates. Is that weird?
Not at all. It's like missing the Opportunity photos.
I wish Mýrdalsjökull or Vatnajökull (https://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/earthquakes/) would go off this summer.
Not fool enough to wish Fuji on the Japanese. That's a frightening mountain now days.

KaiYeves
2019-Feb-22, 01:30 AM
Not at all. It's like missing the Opportunity photos.

YOU! Don’t overwhelm us with feelings in an unrelated thread!

;-)

Superluminal
2019-Mar-15, 08:03 AM
https://abc7news.com/weather/earthquake-strikes-near-hawaiis-kilauea-volcano/5189000/
A little shaking going on.

Squink
2019-Mar-18, 07:25 PM
Right at the shoreline (https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/hv70863117/executive), 7km down.

Swift
2019-Mar-19, 08:07 PM
Interesting article (https://www.westhawaiitoday.com/2019/03/17/hawaii-news/purgatory-in-puna-eruption-survivors-eager-to-return-home-with-or-without-roads/) about how people whose homes were cut off by the lava flows are dealing with things, six months later.


The largest eruption in more than 200 years to hit Kilauea’s lower East Rift Zone stopped more than six months ago.

Yet for dozens of Puna residents with homes or farms in at least two kipuka — isolated pockets of land surrounded by lava flows — the disaster feels like it never ended.

Instead, it has become meshed into their daily routines as they hike in supplies over craggy rivers of cooling volcanic rock, or try to rebuild their lives in other communities, eagerly waiting for the day they can simply drive home.

Those who have returned find a changed landscape, and sometimes destroyed homes or crops consumed by lava flows. But they don’t want to be anywhere else, and they have no interest in waiting.

Trebuchet
2019-Mar-19, 09:39 PM
That inspired me to look at Google Maps to see where those roads were. I was surprised that the satellite images still show before last year's eruption.

Squink
2019-Mar-25, 11:34 PM
That inspired me to look at Google Maps to see where those roads were. I was surprised that the satellite images still show before last year's eruption.
Looks like the route finder will happily lead you over tire shredding lava flows.

This active volcano has been continuously erupting since 1983 & sees over 2 million yearly visitors.

Squink
2019-Apr-02, 08:50 PM
Alert Level:
NORMAL, Color Code: GREEN
2019-03-27 02:29:35 UTC (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html)

Trebuchet
2019-Apr-02, 10:09 PM
Alert Level:Wow. 23 years and some.

Squink
2019-Apr-02, 11:33 PM
Wow.
It's got nothing on the Deccan or Siberian traps.

Trebuchet
2019-Apr-03, 01:30 AM
Or the Columbia River Basalts (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbia_River_Basalt_Group), not all that far east of me. It's an awesome place to visit, but I wouldn't want to live there.