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View Full Version : Given the opportunity, would you travel into space?



dvb
2005-Mar-16, 08:56 AM
I'm just curious to know how many brave souls we have on this board.

If NASA, or another space agency had picked you to travel into space, would you jump at the chance knowing the dangers and inherent risks involved?

I would in a heartbeat. It's a once in a lifetime opportunity. :)

kucharek
2005-Mar-16, 09:06 AM
If I wouldn't be responsible for others, I would do, of course. But I've two children to raise and I wouldn't take 1:100 chances to be killed before they are out of the house and live their own lifes.

Maksutov
2005-Mar-16, 11:04 AM
Since my parenting responsibilities are complete, my career is concluding, relationships are things of the past, the end of my life is approaching, and I have no fear of death, there would be no hesitation whatsoever to choose to go.

I recall drawing a series of pictures when I was about 5 that illustrated frame by frame (from a "looking down" perspective), leaving my backyard and going up through the clouds to where the town was a little pattern of crosshatches, and higher up to where the entire North American continent could be seen, and even more, until the whole globe was hanging out there in space.

It would be nice to have a chance to do that in reality.

BTW, here's a company that supplies the RocketCam™ on-board in-flight cameras that provide those wonderful shots of rocket launches from the perspective of a virtual passenger. (http://www.eclipticenterprises.com/) These are the real versions what I tried to illustrate way back when.

Nicolas
2005-Mar-16, 12:24 PM
My s.o. wouldn't be too fond of it: being long away from home during the training, next the flight (depending on the destination it might take a long time), plus the risk...

So part of me says "yes of course" while another part agrees with her and has doubts about it. If the training could be done with my s.o. close by, and it wouldn't be a long flight, things would change. Now if they'd offer me one of the first Mars trips, uhm, I wouldn't know. Haaaaard choice...

Doodler
2005-Mar-16, 01:08 PM
To Hades with my family...

When do I leave, and is there any chance I don't have to come back?

Nergal
2005-Mar-16, 01:18 PM
Where do I sign and when do we launch? Do I get to push the big red button? Should I bring snacks?

farmerjumperdon
2005-Mar-16, 01:22 PM
In a flash, no hesitation whatsoever, though I'd like it tot be a fairly short trip away from home - 2 or 3 days would be good. I'd miss my babies terribly.

The odds don't bother me, and as we say in skydiving - If something goes wrong, you've got the rest of your life to sort things out and take corrective actrion.

Moose
2005-Mar-16, 02:19 PM
"Moose, how would you like to be on the next lunar landing mission."

"Gee. Let me think about thatYES!"

ToSeek
2005-Mar-16, 02:22 PM
Absolutely!

jfribrg
2005-Mar-16, 03:43 PM
I voted yes. I also see that 100% so far has voted yes. You could also say that 99.999999...% voted yes.

(runs and hides)

WaxRubiks
2005-Mar-16, 03:53 PM
I have an idea that there is a constituency that wouldn't set foot near one of those fireworks even if the icecaps WERE melting, so the poll is sckewed.....

jfribrg
2005-Mar-16, 03:58 PM
Given the audience that the Babb attracts isnt this kind of like taking a telephone poll in order to determine what percentage of the population has a telephone?

WaxRubiks
2005-Mar-16, 04:03 PM
Hey, that might work if you make sure you ring payphones, as well.

How else can they find out???

Candy
2005-Mar-16, 04:23 PM
Absolutely! Can I sit by you?

WaxRubiks
2005-Mar-16, 04:36 PM
There will be 30 of you going on this trip so I think that you will all have to stand in the cargo bay of the space shuttle.

Grendl
2005-Mar-16, 04:39 PM
It's admirable that those who have families are concerned about the risks, but imagine if all astronauts felt that way? I would take the opportunity whether I have a family or not. The odds of dying may be high, but if I lived it would be a great memory for the remainder of my life. Is that selfish? Perhaps, but if I did return, my family (if I had one) would also reap benefits from the experience.

I would like to spend about a month in space for my first trip. I would probably do a lot of looking out the window and writing. Of course, I would want some EVA time, so I would be willing to be trained as needed to fix mechanical problems.

...and I take cream and sugar in my coffee in the morning. :wink:

dvb
2005-Mar-16, 07:03 PM
Wow, I've never seen such a unanimous poll on here before! :o


Where do I sign and when do we launch?

I almost made that the first poll option, but later changed it. :)

Nicolas
2005-Mar-16, 07:08 PM
Notwithstanding my doubts about family, I voted "yes". Because I REALLY want to go into space. If planes are that much fun already, what must space be like 8) .

dvb
2005-Mar-16, 08:01 PM
I voted yes. I also see that 100% so far has voted yes. You could also say that 99.999999...% voted yes.

(runs and hides)

Correction.

99.999999...% voted that they're nuts. 8-[

WaxRubiks
2005-Mar-16, 08:27 PM
Has ANYONE got the balls to admit that they are an out and out landlubber?






I know I haven't. 8-[

dvb
2005-Mar-16, 09:49 PM
Alright, who broke the chain?

It was going so nicely too.

Klausnh
2005-Mar-16, 11:35 PM
Three years ago, I would have said "absolutely". Then I saw the "Space Station" 3D Imax movie and felt claustrophobic during the space station scenes. Now, I don't know.

Nicolas
2005-Mar-16, 11:40 PM
Claustrophobia or other fears wouldn't really be a problem to me. Though I did feel quite some nervosity at the view of a simulated interstellar launch, on which you could see the earth getting bigger and bigger underneath you, untill you saw the complete sphere, which became smaller and smaller, until it was gone. It wouldn't stop me however! It's kind of the same kind of nervosity one feels each time he sees the moon landing sequence (the landing itself, not the ladder descend :)).


It's just that when you're working on spending more time with your s.o., you don't need no astronaut training and flight :). Maybe when we're some years together, she'd wish I'd become an astronaut... :)

If the possibilty of going into space ever occurs, I'll reconsider it together with her :).

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Mar-16, 11:42 PM
Pffft. Where do I sign?

Glom
2005-Mar-16, 11:43 PM
Nah. I think we should solve the problems of global warming first.

Brady Yoon
2005-Mar-16, 11:44 PM
Hey, I'm only 15. If the chances of death are below 1/100, sure. :)

jt-3d
2005-Mar-17, 02:30 AM
I've been using Orbiter for years. Can I drive?

farmerjumperdon
2005-Mar-17, 01:50 PM
I would insist the mission include an attempt to establish a new record for highest altitude skydive. The current record is from just over 100,000 feet, set quite a while back by a guy named Kittel (sp?). He released from a weather balloon and achieved a maximum freefall speed of over 700 MPH.

My only concern would be, what if you went too high and instead of going into a nice accelerating freefall, went into a relatively slowly decaying orbit for a few years?

How high could you go and still expect to fall back quickly. By quickly I mean reach terra firma within a few minutes?

gethen
2005-Mar-17, 02:05 PM
As soon as they find a cure for motion sickness, I'm game. I'd hate to puke my way through space.

pghnative
2005-Mar-17, 02:09 PM
As soon as they find a cure for motion sickness, I'm game. I'd hate to puke my way through space.I don't know -- it'd still be worth it.

Nicolas
2005-Mar-17, 02:46 PM
Do the patches they use (or are it pills) help a lot against space sickness?

Nicolas
2005-Mar-17, 02:48 PM
I would insist the mission include an attempt to establish a new record for highest altitude skydive. The current record is from just over 100,000 feet, set quite a while back by a guy named Kittel (sp?). He released from a weather balloon and achieved a maximum freefall speed of over 700 MPH.

My only concern would be, what if you went too high and instead of going into a nice accelerating freefall, went into a relatively slowly decaying orbit for a few years?

How high could you go and still expect to fall back quickly. By quickly I mean reach terra firma within a few minutes?

If you've got no orbital speed yourself, you could go quite high.

WaxRubiks
2005-Mar-17, 02:55 PM
wait.....


haven't you guys all forgotten about the deadly radiation of the Van Allen Belt? :lol:

Nicolas
2005-Mar-17, 02:55 PM
wait.....


haven't you guys all forgotten about the deadly radiation of the Van Allen Belt? :lol:

Pffff Van Halen is so out [-( [-(

:D

Gullible Jones
2005-Mar-17, 10:16 PM
Heck yeah! :D

Well, if the rest of the crew was friendly and competent...

(A broadband connection to Earth, via laser linkup or something, would sweeten the deal... But hey, you can't have everything.)

WaxRubiks
2005-Mar-17, 10:55 PM
Just make sure that the passageway to the cockpit has been fully sealed and that everyone has been xrayed.


.

farmerjumperdon
2005-Mar-18, 02:19 PM
nicolas quote: [If you've got no orbital speed yourself, you could go quite high.]

Ok, so what does that exactly mean. I'll probably use the wrong terms, but:

As long as I just go "up" but don't make any lateral changes? So if I was watching the Earth rotate unde me, and not rotating with it, I could go to maybe 40 or 50 miles and still fall "down" as soon as I released from my means of lift?[/quote]

Spacewriter
2005-Mar-18, 02:46 PM
Yeah, I'd go. I said that the same day Challenger exploded and again when Columbia broke up. I've spent my whole life waiting to go to space. I work 'in space' in a way, so it would be worth the hardships (motion sickness, training, etc.). That's just the way it is.