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peteshimmon
2018-Aug-24, 04:25 PM
I have always been fascinated by the detection of neutrinos from supernova 1987a. What I did not know until a few years ago was that this was not the first time. Throwing out old magazines I came accross a note about a detection in 1974. At the Homestake mine where the original solar neutrino experiment was installed, a number of drums of water with detectors was set up in the early seventies. The effort was rewarded with a powerful signal on 4 Jan 1974. (K Lande et al, Physics Today, vol 27 no 7 pg17). An image of this is in an old National Geographic book, Amazing Universe, Friedman, 1975.

Another interesting item was a report about Japanese investigators detecting a burst of X rays from Cygnus using a balloon borne telescope in Sep 1975 (J Nishimura, Nature vol 272 pg 337). Now I have put foward ideas about long Grbs being caused by supernova neutrinos hitting local white dwarf stars. So I looked at my list of bursts from the Compton spacecraft and found a number of candidates near to Cygnus from 1991 to 1993. Three of these I calculated must have been so many degrees away from the site of the neutrinos in 1974. On a projection on the sky using an old school compass I found the arcs roughly came together in the lower part of Cepheus. This is in the Milky Way so any supernova was hidden. So I would like to know if any new radio source has been seen here in the last 44 years. It has been fun finding this!

Roger E. Moore
2018-Aug-24, 08:27 PM
Another interesting item was a report about Japanese investigators detecting a burst of X rays from Cygnus using a balloon borne telescope in Sep 1975 (J Nishimura, Nature vol 272 pg 337). Now I have put foward ideas about long Grbs being caused by supernova neutrinos hitting local white dwarf stars. So I looked at my list of bursts from the Compton spacecraft and found a number of candidates near to Cygnus from 1991 to 1993. Three of these I calculated must have been so many degrees away from the site of the neutrinos in 1974. On a projection on the sky using an old school compass I found the arcs roughly came together in the lower part of Cepheus. This is in the Milky Way so any supernova was hidden. So I would like to know if any new radio source has been seen here in the last 44 years. It has been fun finding this!

Here's the paper: http://www.nature.com/articles/272337a0

KaiYeves
2018-Aug-25, 09:02 AM
I feel a little lame discussing this, as I don’t remember the magazine name or year, but for all we like to mock predictions that failed, a few years ago I was reading an issue of one of the popular-science magazines from the 70s or so on Google Books and came across an article that described a person in the future vacationing in Rome who decided to call their friend in San Francisco and pulled a phone the size of a deck of cards from the pocket of their pants... pretty spot-on!

peteshimmon
2018-Aug-29, 10:14 AM
These are details of the three candidates that point to Cepheus. WD2246+223 62lys grb910425 43.9degrees, WD2347+292 69lys grb910517 41.6degrees, WD1935+276 59lys grb911120 45.8degrees. The GAIA catalogue has better distances I hope.

peteshimmon
2018-Aug-31, 10:18 AM
Thanks for the link but annoyingly it does not give the position of the burst observed in 1975 to within 0.3degrees. It would be nice to find it points to wd2117+539 as this is at the right distance and angle to give a burst when hit by the neutrinos in sep 1975. This is using my provisional position of the neutrino source as 22hours at 65degrees. My note of this work says it was "near" cygnus X1 but this is the other side of the constellation.

peteshimmon
2018-Sep-08, 10:55 AM
Ah well! Pity I did not start getting Nature before 1979 for a few years or I might have that copy. Still, when this new neutrino position is fixed then with the accurate white dwarf distances from the GAIA catalogue we will be able to find the burst times for each star to within a day or two and read them off in the BATSE records and GCN notices. That will isolate the true extragalactic bursts. And many stars will be predicted still to burst so it will be interesting to catch one or two!