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ToSeek
2005-Mar-16, 05:54 PM
Answer from 'dusty shelf' aids quest to see matter as it was just after big bang (http://www.physorg.com/news3397.html)


Scientists trying to recreate conditions that existed just a few millionths of a second after the big bang that started the universe have run into a mysterious problem some of the reactions they are getting don't mesh with what they thought they were supposed to see.
Now, two University of Washington physicists have dusted off a quantum mechanics technique usually associated with low-energy physics and applied it to results from experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory on New York's Long Island that produce high-energy collisions between gold nuclei. The result is data much more in line with what theorists expected from the experiments, said John Cramer, a UW physics professor. That means physicists at Brookhaven probably have actually succeeded in creating quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that has not existed since a microsecond after the big bang that began the universe.

2005-Mar-16, 07:06 PM
Answer from 'dusty shelf' aids quest to see matter as it was just after big bang (http://www.physorg.com/news3397.html)


Scientists trying to recreate conditions that existed just a few millionths of a second after the big bang that started the universe have run into a mysterious problem some of the reactions they are getting don't mesh with what they thought they were supposed to see.
Now, two University of Washington physicists have dusted off a quantum mechanics technique usually associated with low-energy physics and applied it to results from experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory on New York's Long Island that produce high-energy collisions between gold nuclei. The result is data much more in line with what theorists expected from the experiments, said John Cramer, a UW physics professor. That means physicists at Brookhaven probably have actually succeeded in creating quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that has not existed since a microsecond after the big bang that began the universe.

The fun thing is the use of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss interferometry in this context. Thus this technique has been used to measure giant stars and now (nearly) infinitesimal quark-gluon fireballs.

Maddad
2005-Mar-16, 08:39 PM
Gezum. They're talking about a temperature of 12 trillion Kelvin.

jfribrg
2005-Mar-17, 08:30 PM
Gezum. They're talking about a temperature of 12 trillion Kelvin.

That would be 11999999999727 Celsius :D

ToSeek
2005-Mar-17, 09:33 PM
Gezum. They're talking about a temperature of 12 trillion Kelvin.

That would be 11999999999727 Celsius :D

Or 21,600,000,000,000 Fahrenheit. ;)

Van Rijn
2005-Mar-17, 10:54 PM
You'd need a great air conditioner ....


Incidentally, the John Cramer mentioned there writes a regular column for Analog magazine that can be interesting reading:

http://www.npl.washington.edu/AV/av_index_chron.html