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geonuc
2018-Oct-26, 03:48 PM
The United States Geological Survey has released its latest assessment of volcano hazards. The last update was in 2005.

The top hazards, considered 'very high risk', haven't changed although their order may have. The Pacific Northwest is home to many of them, including some in my backyard: the Three Sisters and Newberry. Mt St Helens and Mt St Rainier continue to top the PNW list. Kilauea in Hawaii is the overall biggest volcano hazard in the US.

https://www.sciencealert.com/us-geological-survey-national-volcanic-threat-assessment-2018-update

https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/sir20185140

Roger E. Moore
2018-Oct-26, 04:00 PM
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2018/07/news-most-dangerous-volcano-mount-rainier-supervolcanoes-yellowstone/

Many friends in the Seattle area, not looking forward to Mt. Rainier even warming up.

Trebuchet
2018-Oct-26, 10:45 PM
Mt. Rainier, actually, is a trivial threat compared to the Cascadia Subduction Zone. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cascadia_subduction_zone) The last major event (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1700_Cascadia_earthquake#Future_threats) took place at about 21:00 Pacific Time on January 26, 1700 (NS), which we know due to contemporary Japanese records of the resulting tsunami. The next one will probably cause thousands of deaths.

Then again, Mt Rainier is not trivial if you live in Orting, WA, which is built on a nice flat valley floor. Nice and flat because of past inundations by multiple feet of steaming mud.

geonuc
2018-Oct-27, 02:16 AM
Mt. Rainier, actually, is a trivial threat compared to the Cascadia Subduction Zone. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cascadia_subduction_zone) The last major event (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1700_Cascadia_earthquake#Future_threats) took place at about 21:00 Pacific Time on January 26, 1700 (NS), which we know due to contemporary Japanese records of the resulting tsunami. The next one will probably cause thousands of deaths.

Then again, Mt Rainier is not trivial if you live in Orting, WA, which is built on a nice flat valley floor. Nice and flat because of past inundations by multiple feet of steaming mud.

Perhaps, but the USGS assessment is for volcanic hazards, not earthquakes or tsunamis.

KaiYeves
2018-Oct-27, 04:43 AM
Mt. Rainier, actually, is a trivial threat compared to the Cascadia Subduction Zone. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cascadia_subduction_zone) The last major event (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1700_Cascadia_earthquake#Future_threats) took place at about 21:00 Pacific Time on January 26, 1700 (NS), which we know due to contemporary Japanese records of the resulting tsunami. The next one will probably cause thousands of deaths.

Then again, Mt Rainier is not trivial if you live in Orting, WA, which is built on a nice flat valley floor. Nice and flat because of past inundations by multiple feet of steaming mud.
Not just the Japanese records— there are also oral histories of the earthquake and tsunami among the local Native Americans and I believe some destroyed villages have been found archaeologically.

Gillianren
2018-Oct-27, 03:20 PM
I used to worry a lot more about Rainier when my best friend regularly drove between Yelm and Olympia. Both cities are relatively safe from an eruption, but there's area between the two that's going to be in trouble from lahar.

Roger E. Moore
2018-Oct-27, 04:20 PM
The lahar is exactly the trouble I'm worried about. I used to work for TSR, Inc., the D&D game company, in Lake Geneva WI. It was bought out by Wizards of the Coast and moved to Renton, WA, then bought out again by Hasbro Inc. I did not go with the rest of the company to Renton, going to Louisville KY instead. So nearly all my work friends from my TSR days (1983-1995) are there. I was a telecommuter but finally let go by Hasbro in Dec 2000.

Don't want anything bad to happen there.

KaiYeves
2018-Oct-27, 04:47 PM
The lahar is exactly the trouble I'm worried about. I used to work for TSR, Inc., the D&D game company, in Lake Geneva WI. It was bought out by Wizards of the Coast and moved to Renton, WA, then bought out again by Hasbro Inc. I did not go with the rest of the company to Renton, going to Louisville KY instead. So nearly all my work friends from my TSR days (1983-1995) are there. I was a telecommuter but finally let go by Hasbro in Dec 2000.

Don't want anything bad to happen there.
It’s really cool that you worked there, though!

Trebuchet
2018-Oct-27, 11:57 PM
Perhaps, but the USGS assessment is for volcanic hazards, not earthquakes or tsunamis.

Of course, sorry for the digression.


Not just the Japanese records— there are also oral histories of the earthquake and tsunami among the local Native Americans and I believe some destroyed villages have been found archaeologically.

And tree rings. It's those that narrowed it to about 1700 so the Japanese records could be relevant.


The lahar is exactly the trouble I'm worried about. I used to work for TSR, Inc., the D&D game company, in Lake Geneva WI. It was bought out by Wizards of the Coast and moved to Renton, WA, then bought out again by Hasbro Inc. I did not go with the rest of the company to Renton, going to Louisville KY instead. So nearly all my work friends from my TSR days (1983-1995) are there. I was a telecommuter but finally let go by Hasbro in Dec 2000.

Don't want anything bad to happen there.

The second floor of that building in Renton is, or at least used to be, occupied by the Federal Aviation Administration. When I worked for Boeing I was occasionally summoned to meetings at "The Wizards Building" regarding some safety or certification issue. I'd have to do more research, but I think that Renton may be safer than it once was due to a river changing course (human caused) around a hundred years ago. To the detriment of Puyallup.