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View Full Version : Any one know what this star event is called.



VTBoy
2005-Mar-19, 02:09 AM
Last year while watching discovery channel, or TLC, they had a show about mass extinction, and they mentioned scientist discovered a star very similar to our sun. What this star did shocked the scientist, from what I understand the star blew its whole outlayer of its corona away. It was like a CME but over a milliom times greater. They said any momment our sun could do that without any warning, and life on earth would end. So what is that called. I am sure someone here knows what I am refering too.

Spacewriter
2005-Mar-19, 02:16 AM
mass loss?

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Mar-19, 02:18 AM
Uh... some sort of nova? It seems unlikely since it's the wrong type of star, but who knows.

Edit:

Ooh! When a yellow dwarf like our sun expands to a red giant, it eventually throws off its outer layers and becomes a white dwarf. I think. Could this be it?

W.F. Tomba
2005-Mar-19, 02:24 AM
You should probably re-post this in General Astronomy.

Gullible Jones
2005-Mar-19, 03:26 AM
Formation of a planetary nebula. This is perfectly normal...

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Mar-19, 03:30 AM
Yep. That's what I was describing. Couldn't think of the name of the blasted process, though.

SciFi Chick
2005-Mar-19, 03:33 AM
It took me awhile to open this because it's in BABBling rather than General Astronomy, and I was picturing Hollywood stars. :lol:

mickal555
2005-Mar-19, 03:38 AM
Uh... some sort of nova? It seems unlikely since it's the wrong type of star, but who knows.

Edit:

Ooh! When a yellow dwarf like our sun expands to a red giant, it eventually throws off its outer layers and becomes a white dwarf. I think. Could this be it?
No, not really that could not happen anytime and besides it's not the corona but everything else but the core basicly.

The corona is actully very thin and shouldn't do much.

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Mar-19, 03:41 AM
You mean what I said about novas? I agree: impossible. It was just the only thing that I could think of for a minute.

mickal555
2005-Mar-19, 03:43 AM
yeah, I can't think of anything either....

Maybe its a type 2 supernova?

VTBoy
2005-Mar-19, 03:47 AM
No you all misunderstood. It is nothing like a nova, our star would still be a yellow dward after it happens. Think of it like this, take a thinh layer of the corna around the whole sun blow it away, that is what happed to a star very similar to our star. All life would die because the energy would destroy our ozone layer, not that life would end from some extreme heat wave.

Stregone
2005-Mar-19, 03:53 AM
Well I dub it a spontanious kaboom. Update your reference books everyone. :wink:

Yeah I have no clue either. :P

VTBoy
2005-Mar-19, 04:08 AM
Ok I found the name, it is called a superflares. It is just a solar flare or CME which is more than 1 million times greater than our sun has ever produced.

VTBoy
2005-Mar-19, 06:39 PM
The reason for the speculation of super flares is a astrophysist noticed a star very similar to our sun suddenly becoming 20 times brighter, for a short period. He speculated the cause was a Solar Flare millions of times greater than any our sun has ever produced.

Wally
2005-Mar-20, 05:27 PM
Seems many years ago, I heard/read about something that was described as a solar "burp" of sorts. A star would/could cast off it's thin, outer shell in one massive CME, but remain as-is afterwards.

I don't recall hearing about whether this would cause any type of extinction on Earth though.

VTBoy
2005-Mar-20, 07:48 PM
Seems many years ago, I heard/read about something that was described as a solar "burp" of sorts. A star would/could cast off it's thin, outer shell in one massive CME, but remain as-is afterwards.

I don't recall hearing about whether this would cause any type of extinction on Earth though.

It would wipe the ozone layer out. There would be no ozone layer if this event happens.

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Mar-20, 07:52 PM
No, it probably wouldn't affect the nightside ozone layer. Besides, losing the ozone layer wouldn't kill us. I'd be more worried about blackouts and communications disruptions. Either way, we'd survive.

VTBoy
2005-Mar-20, 07:53 PM
No, it probably wouldn't affect the nightside ozone layer. Besides, losing the ozone layer wouldn't kill us. I'd be more worried about blackouts and communications disruptions. Either way, we'd survive.

Experts have said there would be no ozone at all if this happens. It is millions of times greater than the most powerful X class flare we have ever seen. The ozone layer does protect us from UV radiation. We wouldn't survive without an ozone layer.

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Mar-20, 07:55 PM
You can survive just fine under the hole in the ozone layer. UV isn't that bad; it doesn't penetrate. We'd just have to cover up and wear sunscreen.

Also, I don't see ozone on the nightside being affected. Radiation from an event like this (heck, all radiation) would not be able to curve around the Earth to strike any ozone.

Also:


It is millions of times greater than the most powerful X class flare we have ever seen.

The thing is, most of it isn't pointed at us. It would radiate from the Sun in all directions.

VTBoy
2005-Mar-20, 08:01 PM
You can survive just fine under the hole in the ozone layer. UV isn't that bad; it doesn't penetrate. We'd just have to cover up and wear sunscreen.

Also, I don't see ozone on the nightside being affected. Radiation from an event like this (heck, all radiation) would not be able to curve around the Earth to strike any ozone.

The eneregy released would be around 10-100 million times greater than what our sun has ever done. When the CME hits the earth it would engulf the whole earth, the ozone everwhere would instantly be destroyed. The hole in antartica isn't compleatly divoide of ozone, it still has some. This would be different, there would be no ozone at all in our upper atmosphere.

VTBoy
2005-Mar-20, 08:02 PM
You can survive just fine under the hole in the ozone layer. UV isn't that bad; it doesn't penetrate. We'd just have to cover up and wear sunscreen.

Also, I don't see ozone on the nightside being affected. Radiation from an event like this (heck, all radiation) would not be able to curve around the Earth to strike any ozone.

Also:


It is millions of times greater than the most powerful X class flare we have ever seen.

The thing is, most of it isn't pointed at us. It would radiate from the Sun in all directions.


According to the experts astrophysist at Yale and many other university it would be enough to wipe out our ozone layer. However they did also say our sun lacks something these other stars that did this have, a Gas Giant planet larger than jupiter right next to the star. They also said our sun has never produced a flar this large, and the stars which have, seem to do it ever few hundred years.

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Mar-20, 08:09 PM
Okay, how does the CME get to the other side of Earth to destroy the ozone? The radiation cannot curve. It cannot penetrate the Earth. How is the ozone destroyed?

Also, UV radiation is easy to shield against. You don't need an ozone layer to protect you. Just wear a hat.

VTBoy
2005-Mar-20, 08:12 PM
Okay, how does the CME get to the other side of Earth to destroy the ozone? The radiation cannot curve. It is very doubtful that it would be able to go through the Earth, so that doesn't work either. How is the ozone destroyed?

Also, UV radiation is easy to shield against. You don't need an ozone layer to protect you. Just wear a hat.

Don't know but I am sure but these experts at yale and princeton who discovered these superflare that if this ever happen to our sun all life would end. I am sure the sun getting 20 times brighter would have an effect as well on earth. I am also sure these experts know what they are talking about. But they did however said they don't believe our sun could ever produce this type of flare.

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Mar-20, 08:13 PM
Do you have a link to their work? I'm interested now. :)

VTBoy
2005-Mar-20, 08:19 PM
Do you have a link to their work? I'm interested now. :)

No I saw it on the discovery channel and tlc last year, I even recorded it. I watched it few times. And these experts where on the show.


I should also refrase what I said, the ozone wouldn;t be gone forver just a few years. Also not everyone would die, a lot would die from radiation and starvation, but many (billions) would still live, but billions could also die. But humanity wouldn't be wiped out.

i know in the original post I said life would end, that wd have a mistake, what I should have said was a great mass extinction, and countless humans dieing. Not that all life would end.

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Mar-20, 08:27 PM
I can see it being a huge disaster. Electronics and power would be kludged, and I'm sure many people would suffer the effects of increased radiation (including crop failure due to the burst itself). But immediate death? Not too likely.

VTBoy
2005-Mar-20, 08:33 PM
I can see it being a huge disaster. Electronics and power would be kludged, and I'm sure many people would suffer the effects of increased radiation (including crop failure due to the burst itself). But immediate death? Not too likely.

Oh yes the death wouldn't be instant, atleast not for humans.