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Glom
2005-Mar-21, 08:13 PM
Here's the Top Ten English gag.

10. Tony Blair greets the Simpsons at Gatwick. I recall him getting in trouble for taking time out to do a Simpsons episode, but they're just political opportunists moaners.

9. Bart and Lisa get high on English candy.

8. Ejection pods on the Eye.

7. The Judi Dench Fish 'n' Chips

6. Homer is released in return to taking Madonna back.

5. The Tabloid headlines, particularly the one from the Daily Mail about Homer and Prince Harry getting drunk. That's the kind of thing the Daily Mail would do. And the Sun one about Homer being naked or something.

4. 'ertz car hire. And free jellied eels with every Toyota Previa.

3. "I'm going to act in the way Americans do best: unilaterally!"

2. "I know we're not as well behaved as our brother Canada, who by the way doesn't have a girlfriend."

And finally, dum dada dum...

1. "Dad! You entered a roundabout!" That's a reaction I suspect many here would have.

fossilnut2
2005-Mar-21, 08:25 PM
""Dad! You entered a roundabout!"

That happened in National Lampoon's 'European Vacation'. I 'think' in Rome...they went around and around and around.

That was a funny Funny. I think the Simpsons have been to Canada, Brazil, Australia and Bart was used as a child labourer in France.

When they come to Canada, Bart and Millhouse make the Canadian men's basketball team (we are that bad).

Candy
2005-Mar-21, 08:31 PM
""Dad! You entered a roundabout!"

That happened in National Lampoon's 'European Vacation'. I 'think' in Rome...they went around and around and around.
I'm sure it was in London. Remember, as Clark was going mad, he would say, "Hey kids, there's Buckingham Palace." Or was it Big Ben? :lol:

pumpkinpie
2005-Mar-21, 08:34 PM
""Dad! You entered a roundabout!"

That happened in National Lampoon's 'European Vacation'. I 'think' in Rome...they went around and around and around.
I'm sure it was in London. Remember, as Clark was going mad, he would say, "Hey kids, there's Buckingham Palace." Or was it Big Ben? :lol:

"Hey, kids, there's Big Ben. And Parliament." over and over..... :lol:

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Mar-21, 08:34 PM
I was disappointed with the Canadian episode. Only that last seven minutes or so are set in Canada. Bit of a letdown.

Amadeus
2005-Mar-21, 08:37 PM
1. "Dad! You entered a roundabout!" That's a reaction I suspect many here would have.

Is it true what ?I've heard? Theres no Roundabouts in the US? :o

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Mar-21, 08:38 PM
I'm sure they have some. They must.

Candy
2005-Mar-21, 08:41 PM
1. "Dad! You entered a roundabout!" That's a reaction I suspect many here would have.

Is it true what ?I've heard? Theres no Roundabouts in the US? :o
There's one in downtown Indianapolis, Indiana. 8)

Glom
2005-Mar-21, 08:44 PM
There are some, but Americans seem afraid of them. It's weird to think because they are such a regular part of driving in Britain.

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Mar-21, 08:45 PM
We don't get them much here, either, but I actually like them. Much more efficient.

A'a
2005-Mar-21, 08:46 PM
Is it true what ?I've heard? Theres no Roundabouts in the US? :o

I've seen some from time to time. I remeber there being one for sure outside of Frisco, Colorado.

fossilnut2
2005-Mar-21, 08:47 PM
""Dad! You entered a roundabout!"

That happened in National Lampoon's 'European Vacation'. I 'think' in Rome...they went around and around and around.
I'm sure it was in London. Remember, as Clark was going mad, he would say, "Hey kids, there's Buckingham Palace." Or was it Big Ben? :lol:

Yes, you're right. I was probably laughing too hard and destroying brain cells.

Most North American families have some memory of their own 'Family Vacation'. In Canada when little junior asks 'Are we there yet?'. Dad just rolls his eyes and mutters 'Not quite. Only seven thousand kms to go' :o

ngc3314
2005-Mar-21, 08:47 PM
1. "Dad! You entered a roundabout!" That's a reaction I suspect many here would have.

Is it true what ?I've heard? Theres no Roundabouts in the US? :o

We do have some, but few and far between (I recall a handful in Washington, DC), and definitely not a major part of traffic-flow management. I was always bemused by the fact that roundabouts in the UK and continental Europe seem to have exactly the same right-of-way rules, with very different consequences because of the opposite symmetry.

We tend to sign more intersections so as not to have people rely on the "from the right" rule on working out right of-way - so much that I don't recall ever hearing of it until moving to the Netherlands for a couple of years, where this is a fundamental part of traffic flow and the supporting signage is demurely located in a set of triangles on the roadway of the lane which is supposed to give way. I was forever stopping at inappropriate places on city streets, say when a truck was covering the visual cue...

We did go for a visit during the IAU meeting in Den Haag and took the kids (which we hadn't had while actual residents). Drove through enough roundabouts to shout out, "Look, kids - the Binnenhof" (sort of like Parliament) or "Look, kids, Haarzuilens". Or in some parts of both Amsterdam and Dan Haag, "Look, kids - oops, don't look, kids!".

Demigrog
2005-Mar-21, 08:52 PM
1. "Dad! You entered a roundabout!" That's a reaction I suspect many here would have.

Is it true what ?I've heard? Theres no Roundabouts in the US? :o

There are a bunch in Boston; probably they had no choice, because the locals sure seem to ignore stoplights. That was one business trip I'm glad I didn't have to drive the rental car...

Candy
2005-Mar-21, 08:52 PM
Most North American families have some memory of their own 'Family Vacation'. In Canada when little junior asks 'Are we there yet?'. Dad just rolls his eyes and mutters 'Not quite. Only seven thousand kms to go' :o
My absolute favorite is when Clark had the squirrel on his back during Christmas Vacation. OMG. :lol:

fossilnut2
2005-Mar-21, 08:57 PM
...or when the Griswalls (sp?) visit the wrong house in Germany. When they are leaving the woman turns to her husband and says 'who the...was that?'

Candy, come to think of it, aren't they from Illinois? Are they a typical 'Illionoian' family?

pumpkinpie
2005-Mar-21, 08:59 PM
1. "Dad! You entered a roundabout!" That's a reaction I suspect many here would have.

Is it true what ?I've heard? Theres no Roundabouts in the US? :o

There are a bunch in Boston; probably they had no choice, because the locals sure seem to ignore stoplights. That was one business trip I'm glad I didn't have to drive the rental car...

FYI--they're called "Traffic circles" in the US. I don't think anyone's mentioned that. But I think from here on out I'll call them roundabouts. I like that word much better!

Candy
2005-Mar-21, 09:05 PM
...or when the Griswalls (sp?) visit the wrong house in Germany. When they are leaving the woman turns to her husband and says 'who the...was that?'

Candy, come to think of it, aren't they from Illinois? Are they a typical 'Illionoian' family?
I'm not a true Illini. I'm a Hoosier. Honestly, if I could find a man like Clark, I'd marry him. :D

[Time to go visit Sgt Dan for an hour! :o ]

Nicolas
2005-Mar-21, 09:05 PM
1. "Dad! You entered a roundabout!" That's a reaction I suspect many here would have.

Is it true what ?I've heard? Theres no Roundabouts in the US? :o

There are a bunch in Boston; probably they had no choice, because the locals sure seem to ignore stoplights. That was one business trip I'm glad I didn't have to drive the rental car...

FYI--they're called "Traffic circles" in the US. I don't think anyone's mentioned that. But I think from here on out I'll call them roundabouts. I like that word much better!

Up up up and down
turn turn turn around
round round roundabout
and oooover again! \:D/

fossilnut2
2005-Mar-21, 09:07 PM
When I used to live on the other side of Canada (in Nova Scotia) there were two in Halifax and they were called 'rotaries'. I kind of like the word roundabout also....makes it seem more like a game to figure out where to enter and exit rather than a white-knuckle experience.

Nicolas
2005-Mar-21, 09:09 PM
When I used to live on the other side of Canada (in Nova Scotia) there were two in Halifax and they were called 'rotaries'.

You know they even have a fan club.

JimTKirk
2005-Mar-21, 09:09 PM
1. "Dad! You entered a roundabout!" That's a reaction I suspect many here would have.

Is it true what ?I've heard? Theres no Roundabouts in the US? :o
There's one in downtown Indianapolis, Indiana. 8)

I remember that there was a couple on Randolph AFB in Texas. If I remember right, they modeled Randolph on Washington D.C. so maybe they have some there too?

SeanF
2005-Mar-21, 09:38 PM
I think the Simpsons have been to Canada, Brazil, Australia and Bart was used as a child labourer in France.
They've been to China, too - just last week, as Selma was adopting a baby.

I taped that episode, of course, but haven't sat down to watch it yet. :)

Demigrog
2005-Mar-21, 10:04 PM
1. "Dad! You entered a roundabout!" That's a reaction I suspect many here would have.

Is it true what ?I've heard? Theres no Roundabouts in the US? :o

There are a bunch in Boston; probably they had no choice, because the locals sure seem to ignore stoplights. That was one business trip I'm glad I didn't have to drive the rental car...

FYI--they're called "Traffic circles" in the US. I don't think anyone's mentioned that. But I think from here on out I'll call them roundabouts. I like that word much better!

The GPS in the rental car called them roundabouts-- I'd not heard that term before then. I was amazed that the GPS didn't get confused in the things, actually. Can't say that for our driver, alas.

JimTKirk
2005-Mar-21, 10:10 PM
1. "Dad! You entered a roundabout!" That's a reaction I suspect many here would have.

Is it true what ?I've heard? Theres no Roundabouts in the US? :o
There's one in downtown Indianapolis, Indiana. 8)

I remember that there was a couple on Randolph AFB in Texas. If I remember right, they modeled Randolph on Washington D.C. so maybe they have some there too?

I forgot there's one right here in Belleville, Illinois too! It's downtown (if there's such a thing) and they call it the public square(?!).

BAroxMysox
2005-Mar-21, 11:08 PM
There's a quite a few here in Utah. They seem to pop in the most random places, though.

Candy
2005-Mar-21, 11:09 PM
I forgot there's one right here in Belleville, Illinois too! It's downtown (if there's such a thing) and they call it the public square(?!).
I know there is one in a suburb close by, but I can't think of the 'burb's name. I just remember it's not an easy one to drive through. :evil:

Candy
2005-Mar-21, 11:11 PM
When I used to live on the other side of Canada (in Nova Scotia) there were two in Halifax and they were called 'rotaries'.

You know they even have a fan club.
I was a guest speaker at the Rotary Club in Lafayette, Indiana, during highschool. A teacher had given me a joke to open up with, and everyone laughed. I didn't get the joke, until several years later. It was naughty. :oops:

Nicolas
2005-Mar-21, 11:20 PM
too naughty for the BABB to handle? You must have been really good, telling a joke you don't get :) :wink: .

space cadet
2005-Mar-21, 11:40 PM
that was the episode in which JK rowling made a cameo as well.

EvilBob
2005-Mar-21, 11:53 PM
I'm not a true Illini. I'm a Hoosier.
Ok, I'll bite... What's a Hoosier? :o

Candy
2005-Mar-22, 12:01 AM
I'm not a true Illini. I'm a Hoosier.
Ok, I'll bite... What's a Hoosier? :o
I was born and raised in Indiana. [Edit to add] Hoosier is the term used for the people of Indiana.

Hoosier is not a play on words, either. It does not come from "who's there?" Personally, I think it comes from the word Hussar (http://www.dictionary.net/hussar). 8-[

AGN Fuel
2005-Mar-22, 01:22 AM
I'm not a true Illini. I'm a Hoosier.
Ok, I'll bite... What's a Hoosier? :o


Not a basketball fan, EvilBob? :D

Candy
2005-Mar-22, 01:40 AM
I'm not a true Illini. I'm a Hoosier.
Ok, I'll bite... What's a Hoosier? :o


Not a basketball fan, EvilBob? :D
Should I tell him Hoosier's are born with a basketball in their hands? I've made a shot standing backwards at half court over 50 times. No lie, either. 8)

AGN Fuel
2005-Mar-22, 01:42 AM
I'm not a true Illini. I'm a Hoosier.
Ok, I'll bite... What's a Hoosier? :o


Not a basketball fan, EvilBob? :D
Should I tell him Hoosier's are born with a basketball in their hands? I've made a shot standing backwards at half court over 50 times. No lie, either. 8)

In a game??? :lol:

Candy
2005-Mar-22, 01:50 AM
In a game??? :lol:
If it's called H-O-R-S-E. :wink:

Moose
2005-Mar-22, 02:01 AM
When I used to live on the other side of Canada (in Nova Scotia) there were two in Halifax and they were called 'rotaries'. I kind of like the word roundabout also....makes it seem more like a game to figure out where to enter and exit rather than a white-knuckle experience.

The one in Dartmouth was re-engineered sometime around 1990. It's now a very nifty labyrinth of highway exits and intersections. No problem to navigate, just follow the signs to where you want to go, and hope you don't have to cross too many lanes. Traffic's usually not too bad though, so it's usually pretty smooth getting through it, even around rush hour.

The Armdale Rotary is still the traffic knot Haligonians know and "love". Traffic got so bad one year that they actually have traffic cops there to force all traffic out of the rotary onto Quinpool if they can't exit before then. This helped. A lot. Quinpool was a good choice for this, because it leads to the most convenient east-west artery in town, an excellent alternate route to the Bedford Highway and Dutch Village.

Now, it's not so bad during rush hour. It's slow, but tourists are usually too afraid to go near the rotary, so things are predictable. The residents know the rules. Outside car has right of way, then inside car. Repeat. Surprisingly few fender-benders. I personally have never seen one, nor heard of one (via traffic reports).

fossilnut2
2005-Mar-22, 02:03 AM
I'm not a true Illini. I'm a Hoosier.
Ok, I'll bite... What's a Hoosier? :o

I was wondering also but thought best not to ask. I must admit that the answer is somewhat anticlimatic. That's the best nickname they could come up with?

What's someone from Indiana called? An Indianian?

AGN Fuel
2005-Mar-22, 02:05 AM
In a game??? :lol:
If it's called H-O-R-S-E. :wink:

Thank goodness! I thought that maybe your free throw technique was just really, really wrong! :lol:

Candy
2005-Mar-22, 02:05 AM
I'm not a true Illini. I'm a Hoosier.
Ok, I'll bite... What's a Hoosier? :o

I was wondering also but thought best not to ask. I must admit that the answer is somewhat anticlimatic. That's the best nickname they could come up with?

What's someone from Indiana called? An Indianian?
We are called Hoosier's! :lol:

Of course, I prefer Boilermaker's. :wink:

fossilnut2
2005-Mar-22, 02:08 AM
Moose, I used to drive through the Armdale Rotary twice a day. The one in Dartmouth was the 'Mic Mac Rotary'...sheer horror because I only drove through it once a year or so.

One Sunday morning many years ago I just exited the Armdale Rotary and was heading up the NorthWest Arm when a small light plane made an emergency landing just in front of me.

Moose
2005-Mar-22, 02:20 AM
Heh, I lived along Purcell's Cove road and in Portuguese Cove off and on through-out my life, so yeah, Armdale (and Northwest Arm drive) was routine for me as well. I was a veteran of it even before I'd gotten my license. :)


One Sunday morning many years ago I just exited the Armdale Rotary and was heading up the NorthWest Arm when a small light plane made an emergency landing just in front of me.

You mean the three-lane stretch? Ooh! Tell me more? Was the plane very damaged? How on earth did it fit in there? Surely the lane indicator poles would have nailed it coming down?

Man, that must have been incredible flying, if it was a landing the pilot could walk away from.

fossilnut2
2005-Mar-22, 02:39 AM
It would have been about 1980.

I'm not from Nova Scotia (grew up 'mostly' in Quebec) but I lived in N.S. from 79 to 83. Out towards Sambro. I also lived for a bit of time in Blandford (near Hubbards) and a short time in Colchester County (across the Bay of Fundy).

mopc
2005-Mar-22, 03:43 AM
I still don't understand how the Simpsons came to Brazil and didnt see a single black person!! :o

Candy
2005-Mar-22, 03:47 AM
I still don't understand how the Simpsons came to Brazil and didnt see a single black person!! :oYou do know, it's a cartoon? :lol:

Candy
2005-Mar-22, 03:49 AM
I still don't understand how the Simpsons came to Brazil and didnt see a single black person!! :oYou do know, it's a cartoon? :lol:
I should've said, written by a bunch of white computer geek guys...

countdown to .....

EvilBob
2005-Mar-22, 05:51 AM
I'm not a true Illini. I'm a Hoosier.
Ok, I'll bite... What's a Hoosier? :o

I was wondering also but thought best not to ask. I must admit that the answer is somewhat anticlimatic. That's the best nickname they could come up with?

What's someone from Indiana called? An Indianian?
We are called Hoosier's! :lol:

Of course, I prefer Boilermaker's. :wink:
After the explanation for 'Hoosiers', it's probably not worth wondering where 'Boilermakers' comes from! :D
No, AGN, I'm not a basketball fan... Do they have a team by that name? (displaying my ignorance, probably) Here in Aust., we Victorians are usually known as "Mexicans" to the rest of the country....

fossilnut2
2005-Mar-22, 06:11 AM
I still don't understand how the Simpsons came to Brazil and didnt see a single black person!! :o

Back in the 1960's there was a very popular comedy television show in the United States called 'The Andy Griffith Show'. All about the antics of a sherrif and his deputy sidekick. It took place in a town called Mayberry, North Carolina.

The biggest joke (bigger than the jokes in the show) was that Mayberry was the only town in North Carolina without black people and, of course, Andy was the only 'Good old Boy' southern sherrif who didn't spend a good part of his day making sure that Black kids didn't drink from the White's only water fountain. Instead there were no blacks to upset the quaint little town's 'all-american-small-town' image.

Candy
2005-Mar-22, 11:52 AM
After the explanation for 'Hoosiers', it's probably not worth wondering where 'Boilermakers' comes from! :D
No, AGN, I'm not a basketball fan... Do they have a team by that name? (displaying my ignorance, probably) Here in Aust., we Victorians are usually known as "Mexicans" to the rest of the country....
The two biggest rivalries in Indiana are the Indiana University (I.U.) Hoosiers and the Purdue University Boilermakers. Purdue is in the county where I was born. The two school's have a very old tradition fighting over the Old Oaken Bucket (http://groups.msn.com/BoilermakerStevesUnofficialRoseBowlSite/bucketgame.msnw). :D

Candy
2005-Mar-22, 12:00 PM
Has anyone ever compared Clark Griswold and Homer Simpson? They have very similar lives. :-k

captain swoop
2005-Mar-22, 01:47 PM
Roundabouts in the UK work differently to those elsewhere (well in some Euro countries at least)

In the UK we give way to traffic already on the roundabout, In Europe the traffic on the roundabout gives way to traffic entering. It causes no end of fun at Dover and Calais as peope come off the ferries, to add to the confusion visitors to either country find themselves driving on the wrong side of the road :lol:

Edit to add. Even more confusing we have 'Mini' roundabouts. they are normal junctions that are to be treated as roundabouts. They have a roundabout sign and a white circle on the road, sometimes slightly domed.

Nicolas
2005-Mar-22, 03:35 PM
In Belgium, people already on the roundabout have priority.

But then again, trains drive on the left too in Belgium...

At least we're metric :lol: :wink:

Roving Philosopher
2005-Mar-22, 04:36 PM
I think the Simpsons have been to Canada, Brazil, Australia and Bart was used as a child labourer in France.
They've been to China, too - just last week, as Selma was adopting a baby.

I taped that episode, of course, but haven't sat down to watch it yet. :)
And Japan, and Africa (I believe the country was "Pepsi presents New Zanzibar" :) ), and Bart briefly travelled to Hong Kong as a courier.

fossilnut2
2005-Mar-22, 05:54 PM
Has anyone ever compared Clark Griswold and Homer Simpson? They have very similar lives. :-k

Or Ralph Cramden (Jackie Gleason) and Fred Flinstone?

captain swoop
2005-Mar-23, 09:10 AM
Has anyone ever compared Clark Griswold and Homer Simpson? They have very similar lives. :-k

Or Ralph Cramden (Jackie Gleason) and Fred Flinstone?

Well, Flintstones was a direct coyp of the 'Honeymooners'

FarmMarsNow
2010-May-24, 03:32 AM
In the US, people not in the roundabout always must yield right of way to those already in it; which can be confusing since those in the roundabout do not have right of way except when driving in particular states. That is because for commonwealth states only pedestrians legally have right of way but in other states auto drivers have right of way as well. Roundabouts go counter-clockwise. Recently they've been installing roundabouts more frequently, so people are just getting used to them.

DonM435
2010-May-24, 05:24 AM
[Due to some deletion or other, what had been here makes even less sense than my typical contribution, so out with it.]

HenrikOlsen
2010-May-24, 12:14 PM
Major necromancy alert.

tdvance
2010-May-24, 10:54 PM
I, a couple weeks ago, had a little problem because, apparently, in New Jersey, some round... I mean, "traffic circles" give right of way to traffic entering over traffic in the circle. This was in the area north of Trenton, south of Princeton. The car, who apparently did have right of way after all, drove on the shoulder parallel to me instead of waiting.

Yep---not following the standard can cause problems, or accidents. Just wait till I find a state were a red light means "go" and a green light means "stop"....

Glom
2010-May-25, 08:17 AM
Giving way to traffic entering is stupid. It's a sure fire way to get the roundabout clogged up. You need to prioritise clearing the roundabout over getting more traffic on it. There are a couple of signal controlled roundabouts on the A316 round Twickenham way such as Hospital Bridge Roundabout. So I'm approaching on the A316 and the lights to enter the roundabout go red. A few seconds later, the lights on the roundabout before the entry from Hospital Bridge Road go red. Then we wait and the lights on the roundabout go green and then the lights to enter go green. So there are a few seconds when the lights are red to all entering traffic while the lights are green to all traffic on the roundabout. The idea is to enable the clearing of the roundabout before anyone else gets on.

DonM435
2010-May-25, 12:34 PM
This is a most informative discussion. Based upon the comments attesting to the rarity ("I saw one of those once ... I think ... ") of the structures, and the difficulty of navigation ("Here's ten things you have to remember ..." ), I'd have to conclude that it's a very bad traffic control concept.

HenrikOlsen
2010-May-25, 01:43 PM
It can be an excellent traffic control concept if you use it for what it's good for and people agree on how to use it, especially where roads meet that don't form a nice cross or T.
Unless regulated by timed lights, right of way must, for simple and fairly obvious reasons which Glom mentioned, be given to those already in the roundabout, the other way automatically leads to clogging and much lower throughput.
Anyone in a position to actually regulate this, who suggests otherwise, needs to be immediately reclassified as furniture and packed away in a storage closet.