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View Full Version : Total Lunar Eclipse - Afterward Extreme Brightness - Jan 20



Centaur
2019-Jan-13, 07:10 PM
A Total Lunar Eclipse can be seen by those with clear skies in the Americas during the evening of Sunday 2019 JAN 20. Many in Europe should be able to witness totality during the predawn hours of Monday 2019 JAN 21.

Iíve calculated that after the Moon leaves the penumbra it will be the brightest Moon since 2001 JAN 09-10 and until 2096 NOV 29-30. This is due to the confluence of the Moon being near Perigee, Perihelion and Ecliptic. Some in the media have been hyping this as a so-called SuperMoon for being near Perigee. But they have been overlooking the Perihelion and Ecliptic factors that will make this Full Moon especially bright when just outside of the Earthís shadow.

Below is a link to my Moon webpage. It includes a preview graphic for the eclipse as seen against an imaginary blue wall to make the shadow fully apparent. The predicted event timings are in CST (UT-6), but will occur at essentially the same real time for all observers experiencing nighttime. The depicted orientation and Moon altitudes are for an observer in Chicago.

Photos and descriptions of the eclipse would be welcome additions to this thread.

Link: https://www.CurtRenz.com/moon.html

George
2019-Jan-13, 08:16 PM
Great point! It's a Super Duper Moon!

It's only 0.214% farther than perigee versus apogee at 13.85% farther, and only 0.07% farther from perihelion versus 3.4% farther at aphelion.

Nowhere Man
2019-Jan-13, 11:09 PM
Link: https://www.CurtRenz.com/moon.html

The title on that page is "Moo".

Fred

Nowhere Man
2019-Jan-14, 11:13 PM
The title on that page is "Moo".

It's better now. :D

Fred

Superluminal
2019-Jan-23, 04:16 AM
I observed the Eclipse from S.W. Arkansas. Past lunar eclipses, I simply watched and enjoyed the view. This time I decided to try and do something that might resemble real science.
I used the Danjon scale from Rick Berman's "Strange Universe," Astronomy magazine January 2019, to estimate the moons brightness during the total phase.
At the beginning of totality, the sky was almost perfectly clear. I estimated the Danjon number as 3.
Mid eclipse I gave it a D#2.
Oddly, after mid eclipse, the moon seemed to get darker. Ten minutes after mid eclipse I gave it a D#1.5.
By the end of totality, D# had returned to 3.
As the bright lunar rim emerged from Earth's shadow, it illuminated thin hazy clouds that moved in during totality. The possible reason for the moon getting darker after mid eclipse.
I observed from in town. Very light polluted sky's.
Still, a beautiful and memorable sight.

Centaur
2019-Jan-23, 04:20 AM
I observed the Eclipse from S.W. Arkansas. Past lunar eclipses, I simply watched and enjoyed the view. This time I decided to try and do something that might resemble real science.
I used the Danjon scale from Rick Berman's "Strange Universe," Astronomy magazine January 2019, to estimate the moons brightness during the total phase.
At the beginning of totality, the sky was almost perfectly clear. I estimated the Danjon number as 3.
Mid eclipse I gave it a D#2.
Oddly, after mid eclipse, the moon seemed to get darker. Ten minutes after mid eclipse I gave it a D#1.5.
By the end of totality, D# had returned to 3.
As the bright lunar rim emerged from Earth's shadow, it illuminated thin hazy clouds that moved in during totality. The possible reason for the moon getting darker after mid eclipse.
I observed from in town. Very light polluted sky's.
Still, a beautiful and memorable sight.

Excellent scientific description. Thank you. And glad you enjoyed viewing the event.

Superluminal
2019-Jan-24, 01:21 AM
I also sent my observation to Stephen J. O'Meara at "Astronomy Magazine." He said that the post mid eclipse darkening had Ben noted n a previous eclipse he observed from Africa. He believes It maybe a real change that reflected the state of the atmosphere post mid eclipse.

Roger E. Moore
2019-Jan-29, 07:54 PM
Fastest paper to publication ever? :)

https://arxiv.org/abs/1901.09573

Location, orbit and energy of a meteoroid impacting the moon during the Lunar Eclipse of January 21, 2019

Jorge I. Zuluaga et al. (Submitted on 28 Jan 2019)

During the total lunar eclipse of January 21, 2019 at least two meteoroids impacted the moon producing visible flash lights on the near side. One of the impacts occurred on the darkest side of the visible lunar face and was witnessed by many casual observers. In this paper we present estimations of the location, impact parameters (velocity and incoming direction), orbit and energy of the meteoroid, as obtained from images and videos collected by amateur astronomers in Colombia, the Dominican Republic and Morocco. We use the novel Gravitational Ray Tracing (GRT) technique to estimate the orbital properties and radiant of the impactor. We find that that the meteoroid impacted the moon with a speed of 13.8 +4.3/−7.3 km/s and in a relatively shallow angle, θ<35.6 degrees. According to our photometric estimations, the impact released 10^7 J of visible light in a short time (0.30 seconds). The total impact energy was 0.9−1.8 tons of TNT which correspond to a body with a mass between 20-100 kg and a diameter of 30-50 cm. If our assumptions are correct, the crater left by the impact will have 7-15 meters across and it could be detectable by prospecting lunar probes. These results arose from a timely collaboration between professional and amateur astronomers which highlight the importance of citizen science in contemporary astronomy.