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kucharek
2005-Mar-24, 03:48 PM
100 years ago today, Jules Verne died. I still like a lot of his books.
Now, he also made some mistakes, let's compile a list.

To me, the most glaring of all was always his complete misunderstanding of free-fall and weightlessness in "Around the Moon".

Harald

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Mar-24, 04:58 PM
What about being able to breathe in "Around the Moon"?

Madcat
2005-Mar-24, 05:04 PM
Well, he doesn't seem to have a very good understanding of what Mars is like, if War of the Worlds is any indication. I guess he did pretty well for the period though.

kucharek
2005-Mar-24, 05:08 PM
Well, he doesn't seem to have a very good understanding of what Mars is like, if War of the Worlds is any indication. I guess he did pretty well for the period though.

I guess, Madcat will post some :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: soon. :D

Nicolas
2005-Mar-24, 05:37 PM
:D

(I had to look up the author, but at least I was sure it wasn't Verne, so only a little :oops: for me :D . It couldn't have been Verne, considering the fact that it was broadcasted on public radio.)

kucharek
2005-Mar-24, 05:56 PM
It couldn't have been Verne, considering the fact that it was broadcasted on public radio.

I'd say, that earns a few :oops: :oops: :oops:, too - for logic.

Nicolas
2005-Mar-24, 05:59 PM
It couldn't have been Verne, considering the fact that it was broadcasted on public radio.

I'd say, that earns a few :oops: :oops: :oops:, too - for logic.

Why? Verne died in 1905. Radio was very primitive then, not in a stage where hear plays were broadcasted.

Edit: OK here's the explanation of my mistake:

The book is written by H.G. Wells. It was broadcasted by Orson Welles (sometimes written as Orson Wells) in 1938.
The book had been written 40 years before the broadcast though , when Verne was still alive. here comes a :oops: for me. :)

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Mar-24, 06:05 PM
It couldn't have been Verne, considering the fact that it was broadcasted on public radio.

I'd say, that earns a few :oops: :oops: :oops:, too - for logic.

Why? Verne died in 1905. Radio was very primitive then, not in a stage where hear plays were broadcasted.
Even though Wells lived long after the broadcast, I think he had nothing to do with the broadcast. It's been re-broadcast many times since his death. And so have some of Jules Verne's works.

Grey
2005-Mar-24, 06:05 PM
Why? Verne died in 1905. Radio was very primitive then, not in a stage where hear plays were broadcasted.
Well, I've seen plays purportedly by Shakespeare (:D) on television, but that doesn't mean that they must instead have been written by someone who was alive after television was invented.

Nicolas
2005-Mar-24, 06:14 PM
All: see the edit in which I explain the mistake I made between H.G Wells (the author of the book) and Orson Welles (who started the Mercury theater, which broadcasted the play, and is sometimes even typed as Orson Wells).

Edit to add: Madcat, it seems that I've taken the blows for you :D

sidmel
2005-Mar-24, 06:19 PM
Well, War of the Worlds was H.G. Wells.

As far a Vernes goes, I've read many of his books and found him an enteraining writer. Considering what was then known and/or speculated about space, I think he did a credable job. He was simple doing what science fiction writers have always done, writing stories and theorizing about.

** Nicolas beat me to it.

Nicolas
2005-Mar-24, 06:33 PM
About Well(e)s: how many " :oops: " do I get credited for that name mix-up (which justifies the radio remark, as I thought it was broadcasted when it was written, which was years after Verne's death)? :)

About Verne: I haven't read enough from him to point out errors.

Sotos
2005-Mar-24, 06:56 PM
Verne did not understand the kind of G forces involved in being fired from an enormous cannon, as in From the Earth to the Moon. The astronauts inside the shell would have been instantly reduced to a thin protoplasmic plasma on the floor of their space capsule.

Nicolas
2005-Mar-24, 06:59 PM
Verne did not understand the kind of G forces involved in being fired from an enormous cannon, as in From the Earth to the Moon. The astronauts inside the shell would have been instantly reduced to a thin protoplasmic plasma on the floor of their space capsule.

I've done it in Disneyland's Space Mountain, and it wasn't all that bad! :D

Seriously: Even though cannon launches are investigated and tested, that kind of impulsive acceleration indeed isn't suited for manned craft.

kucharek
2005-Mar-24, 07:00 PM
Verne did not understand the kind of G forces involved in being fired from an enormous cannon, as in From the Earth to the Moon. The astronauts inside the shell would have been instantly reduced to a thin protoplasmic plasma on the floor of their space capsule.
I think, he understood, but he needed this plot hole to get his story written.

mike alexander
2005-Mar-24, 07:49 PM
In the case of FTETTM, Verne did understand the accelerations. He put in the waterbed shock aborbers as early Trek-style technobabble, knowing they wouldn't actually offer real protection, but, as kucharek said, he had to move the plot along.

I'm lucky enough to have a translation of the original overseen by his grandson (I recall) Jean-Jules Verne, and I was impressed at what Verne DID get right. He has a long discussion of the merits of propellant (in that case, gunpowder vs. guncotton), gets things like escape velocity right, etc.

What I didn't realize, until I read the full version, was the depth of affectionate satire there is in the story about Americans (AND French). Barbicane and Nichol remind me a bit of Dick Seaton and Blackie DuQuesne, Michael Ardan is himself a gentle parody of the voluble Frenchman.

It really is a very good book, if you get the original, not some chopped-up fragment.

mopc
2005-Mar-24, 08:41 PM
In "Paris in the 20th Century" he said there would be a port in Paris.

kucharek
2005-Mar-24, 08:55 PM
In "Paris in the 20th Century" he said there would be a port in Paris.
And it had two: Charles de Gaulle and Le Bourget

mopc
2005-Mar-24, 08:57 PM
In "Paris in the 20th Century" he said there would be a port in Paris.
And it had two: Charles de Gaulle and Le Bourget

So let's open an mopc mistakes thread! #-o Wait a second! Charles de Gaule is an airport, right? Verne said "port" for ships, water ships, throught the river Seine.

Nicolas
2005-Mar-24, 09:11 PM
In "Paris in the 20th Century" he said there would be a port in Paris.
And it had two: Charles de Gaulle and Le Bourget

So let's open an mopc mistakes thread! #-o Wait a second! Charles de Gaule is an airport, right? Verne said "port" for ships, water ships, throught the river Seine.

Nitpick: Charles de Gaulle, Orly, and Le Bourget (and 10 smaller ones, and a heliport :))

(this thread should have been about Verne's mistakes... :lol: We're such heroes)

Fram
2005-Mar-24, 09:19 PM
The port of Paris... (http://www.paris-ports.fr/)

Nicolas
2005-Mar-24, 09:21 PM
This thread is gold! :lol: :lol:
(I'm falling on the ground now :D )
(Someone put a link to this thread in the "how wrong can you get" thread)

Fram
2005-Mar-24, 09:29 PM
I only answer, I don't propose new things. That way, I have less chance of making mistakes. I haven't read that much Verne anyway...

Ummm, let me think. Didn't they enter the earth via a hole in the north pole? Or am I mixing up stories?

Paul Beardsley
2005-Mar-24, 09:41 PM
This thread is gold! :lol: :lol:
(I'm falling on the ground now :D )
(Someone put a link to this thread in the "how wrong can you get" thread)

There must be a limit to how far you can agree with someone!

Of course, when H.G. Wells wrote Ringworld, Arthur C. Clarke said it was nowhere near as good as his own Foundations of Paradise Trilogy...

Meanwhile, I make hardly any mistakes about which SF author wrote what. But I make loads of mistakes in real life, so I always know the last laugh is on me.

But that doesn't mean I can't enjoy it while it lasts!

Fram
2005-Mar-24, 09:43 PM
EDIT: double posting :oops:

Nicolas
2005-Mar-24, 09:43 PM
Richard, you MUST read this thread! :D

Fram, did you intend to do that double posting as a joke, or is this yet another mistake? :)

Edit: yep, yet another mistake. It's getting really :oops: here :D

Paul Beardsley
2005-Mar-24, 09:47 PM
I only answer, I don't propose new things. That way, I have less chance of making mistakes. I haven't read that much Verne anyway...

Ummm, let me think. Didn't they enter the earth via a hole in the north pole? Or am I mixing up stories?

You're not too far out. They enter the earth via a (real-life) volcano called Sneffles.

Journey To The Centre Of The Earth is actually a very good book. Loads of chapters are taken up with the trip to (and across) Iceland. At one point, the explorers find themselves staying with a family who have a great many children, and the explorers find themselves entertaining the children. When I re-read it a few years ago, I couldn't relate to it at all.

But since then, I've discovered that getting on with children is the single best thing you can do in life, so I shall re-read it soon.

Disinfo Agent
2005-Mar-24, 10:03 PM
You're not too far out. They enter the earth via a (real-life) volcano called Sneffles.
An extinguished volcano. So far, so good. What's harder to believe is how they get out, riding on lava! :o

There's also a part where they get close to the centre of the Earth, IIRC, which I thought was unnecessarily implausible. (Why not just settle for a couple hundred miles below the surface?)

Fun book, nonetheless, particularly if you like dinosaurs. :wink:

pghnative
2005-Mar-24, 11:58 PM
There's also a part where they get close to the centre of the Earth, IIRC, which I thought was unnecessarily implausible. (Why not just settle for a couple hundred miles below the surface?)
Well, it does make for a better book title. Who would want to read "Journey Through 5% of the Earth's Radius"?