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Bob B.
2005-Mar-26, 06:49 AM
Since we have many astronomy fans around here, I'm just wondering how many of you have had the trill to stand in the Moon's shadow. I've seen three so far:

1994 - Bolivia
1998 - Aruba
1999 - Black Sea

Hopefully there will be more. The next one on my target list is 29-March-2006. If you've never seen a total solar eclipse I highly recommend it. An eclipse is truly a unique and wondrous spectacle.

cyswxman
2005-Mar-26, 06:56 AM
Not yet. If I'm still here in 2017 (alive and living here), I'll be able to catch the eclipse path of totality passing just north of here.

ToSeek
2005-Mar-26, 05:21 PM
I saw the 1998 one from a cruise ship in the Caribbean. It was pretty cool!

Kullat Nunu
2005-Mar-26, 05:40 PM
I've seen a total solar eclipse three times.

1990 Finland -- cloudy, didn't see the actual eclipse, but sky went really dark.
1999 Germany -- almost missed it, but at the critical moment a hole appeared in both lower and upper cloud covers so the whole totality was visible.
2001 Zambia -- cloudless sky, and this was a long eclipse. I was able to see it through telescope (corona was magnificent!) and I had even time to look around - the whole horizon was red, like the sun was rising from every direction. It was easy to feel how temperature was falling. I could hear how cicadas started to chirp as they thought that night was falling.

kucharek
2005-Mar-26, 05:46 PM
In 1999, the totality path went right dead smack through Karlsruhe, and we had one of the few holes in the cloud cover in Europe that day 8)

Harald

Bob B.
2005-Mar-26, 06:29 PM
Here is a summary of the three I've seen so far:

http://www.braeunig.us/eclipse/1999/report2.html

I also seriously considered going to Africa in 2001 but decided against it.

ngc3314
2005-Mar-26, 06:29 PM
Since we have many astronomy fans around here, I'm just wondering how many of you have had the trill to stand in the Moon's shadow. I've seen three so far:

1994 - Bolivia
1998 - Aruba
1999 - Black Sea

Hopefully there will be more. The next one on my target list is 29-March-2006. If you've never seen a total solar eclipse I highly recommend it. An eclipse is truly a unique and wondrous spectacle.

Just the one, Oregon 1979. (Some pictures from then may be seen at http://www.astr.ua.edu/keel/stargaze/eclipses.html). Fastest my old Mercury ever went was down the interstate when we saw a gap in the clouds.

And if I can hold out long enough, there is another path of totality heading not too far from here in 12 years or so.

Bob B.
2005-Mar-26, 06:48 PM
(Some pictures from then may be seen at http://www.astr.ua.edu/keel/stargaze/eclipses.html).
Nice photos! I particularly like your "diamond ring"; you exposed it perfectly.


Fastest my old Mercury ever went was down the interstate when we saw a gap in the clouds.
I had an experience like that chasing after the 1994 annular eclipse in New Mexico. I spent the night in Roswell and woke up to clear skies, but within an hour it completely clouded over and started raining. My three friends and I got in our van and started driving west along a highway that followed the eclipse path. We happened to stumble upon a whole in the clouds just minutes before annularity. It was a fun adventure.


And if I can hold out long enough, there is another path of totality heading not too far from here in 12 years or so.
Here's a summary I wrote about the 2017 eclipse for my Web page:


2017-Aug-21

Finally the United States is home to another total eclipse. The eclipse cuts a 100-115 km path through the middle of the country passing through Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, northeast Kansas, Missouri, southern Illinois, western Kentucky, Tennessee, western North Carolina, northeast Georgia, and South Carolina. The eclipse begins over the north Pacific Ocean and passes over nothing but empty sea before reaching the coast of Oregon at 17:17 UT. One minute later the centerline passes about 15 km south of Salem, where the duration is 2:00 and the Sun's altitude is 40 degrees. The eclipse reaches Casper, Wyoming at 17:44 UT, where the duration has increased to 2:26, and then continues east-southeast. The four largest cities to experience totality all lie near the edge of the path. At 18:03 UT Lincoln, Nebraska passes about 10 km inside the northern limit, while six minutes later the southern limit grazes Kansas City, Missouri. At 18:18 UT Saint Louis, Missouri is grazed by the northern limit, and ten minutes after that Nashville passes about 15 km inside the southern limit. The eclipse reaches its maximum duration of 2:40.2 at 18:22 UT in southern Illinois where the Sun's altitude is 64 degrees. As the centerline reaches South Carolina it passes about 15 km south of Columbia at 18:43 UT and then reaches the Atlantic Ocean 4.5 minutes later about 50 km northeast of Charleston where the duration is 2:34. The eclipse then sweeps across the Atlantic Ocean coming to an end 600 km southwest of Cape Verde. Other major US cities passing within 85 km of totality include Eugene, Portland, Boise, Omaha, Topeka, Chattanooga, Knoxville (a near miss), and Charlotte.
And here's a summary of all total eclipses through 2020:

http://www.braeunig.us/eclipse/eclipses.html

frogesque
2005-Mar-26, 07:24 PM
Thanks Bob B.

...The eclipse crosses the Mediterranean passing midway between Crete and Cyprus and then reaching the southern coast of Turkey. Although portions of Turkey experience totality earlier, the centerline does not reach the Turkish mainline until it comes ashore near the city of Manavgat at 10:57 UT, where the duration is about 3:45. ...

Spring in Turkey, 2006. March 29th. Sounds good! I was going to travel down to Cornwall for the 1999 event but had to call off at the last minute. Just as well because it was clouded out.

eburacum45
2005-Mar-26, 07:54 PM
Luckily I go to Cornwall regularly, to visit relatives; we were all present for the (somewhat cloudy) 1999 event. But my mate Paul is an eclipse chaser, and has seen four or five now. They are apparently much better without English clouds.

beskeptical
2005-Mar-26, 09:22 PM
:cry: :cry: :cry:

First eclipse...my Dad thought we'd all be blinded so we went to the movies. How could I be a product of that man's genes? :evil:

Second eclipse...it was in the US when we happened to be traveling in Australia.

Third eclipse....the big one...I went to Mazatlan. Minutes, literally minutes before totality the clouds quickly filled the sky. I out ran them to the farthest rock you could get on out in the ocean. I was ahead, until the land ran out.

Ahhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!

But 2017 is fast approaching. I will be in the driest part of the path you can find, in a car, ready to move if the clouds even blink in the sky. :D

Disinfo Agent
2005-Mar-26, 09:40 PM
Minutes, literally minutes before totality the clouds quickly filled the sky. I out ran them to the farthest rock you could get on out in the ocean. I was ahead, until the land ran out.

Ahhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!
:lol: Sorry, but that was really funny.

WaxRubiks
2005-Mar-26, 10:38 PM
Cornwall 1999- but it was cloudy.

it's amazing how the sea gulls react, they think that the sun is going down and make a lot of noise(getting ready for sleep i suppose).

just saw the cresent though the clouds..

R.A.F.
2005-Mar-26, 10:56 PM
If I'm still here in 2017...

Yeah, that's the one I'm waiting for...and I won't have to travel that far either. :)

Fortis
2005-Mar-26, 11:07 PM
Cornwall 1999- but it was cloudy.

it's amazing how the sea gulls react, they think that the sun is going down and make a lot of noise(getting ready for sleep i suppose).

just saw the cresent though the clouds..
I was there for that one. Were you on the coast, because from where we were the sea took on the colours of purple and gold. Very impressive. :) (The flash photos that other people were taking were impressive for other reasons. ;) )

WaxRubiks
2005-Mar-26, 11:12 PM
yes, on the coast.

Fortis
2005-Mar-26, 11:40 PM
yes, on the coast.
Were were on the beach between Penzance and St. Michael's Mount (or where BBC Radio 1 were having their beach party.) A group of people near to us ran into the sea at totality, screamed, and then one of their number refused to come out because he'd lost his swimming trunks. The eclipse was truly a mystical event. ;) :)

JohnOwens
2005-Mar-26, 11:45 PM
Just the one, Oregon 1979. (Some pictures from then may be seen at http://www.astr.ua.edu/keel/stargaze/eclipses.html). Fastest my old Mercury ever went was down the interstate when we saw a gap in the clouds.
That's the closest I've come to seeing a total eclipse, but here in Wisconsin, it was only partial, although a pretty good part. I think I might have damaged my night vision slightly that day.


But 2017 is fast approaching. I will be in the driest part of the path you can find, in a car, ready to move if the clouds even blink in the sky. :D
Or, thinking outside the box a bit, your safest bet would be in an airplane, [b]above]/b] the clouds (short of LEO, of course).

2005-Mar-27, 12:09 AM
I saw the 1998 one from a cruise ship in the Caribbean. It was pretty cool!

Which ship? I was on the Ryndam ... weather was perfect, view was awsome.
At
http://www.astro.ufl.edu/~oliver/solareclipse1998/
I am the guy in the funny hat.

Bob B.
2005-Mar-27, 12:39 AM
Spring in Turkey, 2006. March 29th. Sounds good!
When I went to Europe for the 1999 eclipse I took a cruise from Greece up to the Black Sea. We made a couple stops in Turkey and I really enjoyed it. I'm strongly considering returning to Turkey for the 2006 eclipse.

mickal555
2005-Mar-27, 06:00 AM
I want to but until I move out of home (in about 4-5 years), I have to wait for the eclipses to come to me. Is there anyway to find out if there will be any for brissie or perth?

cyswxman
2005-Mar-27, 07:08 AM
The path of the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse (http://nmazca.com/skychurch/SE2017Aug21T.gif)
Somebody ought to see it!

Padawan
2005-Mar-27, 07:09 AM
Unfortunately, the next total eclipse will be in 2126 in Sweden, so if I'm alive by then heck, why not? :P

Anyway, there was an ~70% eclipse here a few years ago, but guess if it got cloudy!

cyswxman
2005-Mar-27, 07:30 AM
I want to but until I move out of home (in about 4-5 years), I have to wait for the eclipses to come to me. Is there anyway to find out if there will be any for brissie or perth?
This link (http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/SEatlas/SEatlas.html), and more specifically, this link (http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/SEatlas/SEatlas3/SEatlas2001.GIF) , depicts solar eclipses for many years in advance. Looks like a couple affecting Australia in 2012 and 2013.

beskeptical
2005-Mar-27, 07:50 AM
Minutes, literally minutes before totality the clouds quickly filled the sky. I out ran them to the farthest rock you could get on out in the ocean. I was ahead, until the land ran out.

Ahhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!
:lol: Sorry, but that was really funny.Don't be sorry. If we can't laugh, life wouldn't be worth living. :lol:

I have to say the look on everyone's faces when all of us out on this tiny little land extension knew it was over will be forever in my mind. Personally, I felt a bit jinxed, but knowing the phenomena occurs on a regular basis, I just figured I'd move on to the next one.

And BTW, it did not get as dark as some people claim. It was more like dusk than night.

weatherc
2005-Mar-27, 10:56 PM
I've never seen a solar eclipse. If I didn't know any better, I would guess that solar eclipses actually cause cloudy days, because every single time there is a solar eclipse where I live, it's a cloudy day. :(

2005-Mar-27, 11:05 PM
I've never seen a solar eclipse. If I didn't know any better, I would guess that solar eclipses actually cause cloudy days, because every single time there is a solar eclipse where I live, it's a cloudy day. :(

Based on 45 years of experience, solar eclipses cause clouds, lunar occultations cause clouds, stellar eclipses cause clouds ... the rarer the event, the more certain it will cloud up. On the otherhand, equipment failure results in crystal clear skies.

Bob B.
2005-Mar-27, 11:33 PM
Based on 45 years of experience, solar eclipses cause clouds, lunar occultations cause clouds, stellar eclipses cause clouds ... the rarer the event, the more certain it will cloud up. On the otherhand, equipment failure results in crystal clear skies.
There's another law that states when one buys a new telescope, the number of consecutive cloudy nights that follow is equal the telescope's aperture in inches.

Swift
2005-Mar-28, 03:46 PM
I was 11 for the March 1970 one up the east coast of the US. All I remember is my mom didn't want me to watch it :-?
The May 1991 one went right over Ohio and I had a great view of it, through scopes with filters, approved glasses, and pinhole views of the projected image (it was a park/astronomy club event). I remember during just around totality there was some neat polarized light effects that I had heard about. We also had a bunch of birds that went into their twillight songs.

TriangleMan
2005-Mar-28, 04:17 PM
I saw the February 1979 eclipse but was too far away to see it in totality, just a pretty good partial. Maybe next time.

pghnative
2005-Mar-28, 04:48 PM
But 2017 is fast approaching. I will be in the driest part of the path you can find, in a car, ready to move if the clouds even blink in the sky. :DSee you there --- I'll be in an RV. (Either that, or I'll make a half dozen hotel reservations all along the path)

A'a
2005-Mar-28, 05:04 PM
Just once. June 1991. While most of Hawaii was clouded over, it was actually sunny on the north shore of Kauai. What are the odds of that?

Argos
2005-Mar-28, 05:10 PM
In fact, I think astronomy became a matter of interest to me because of a total eclipse back in the 60īs (I was a little kid). I was strongly impressed at mama saying that "the world would get dark". It seemed like the world was ending. All the neighbors gathered in the street in front of their houses to watch the spectacle. Later, in 1994, I observed a second one in great style.

tjm220
2005-Mar-28, 10:23 PM
Just the one, Oregon 1979. (Some pictures from then may be seen at http://www.astr.ua.edu/keel/stargaze/eclipses.html). Fastest my old Mercury ever went was down the interstate when we saw a gap in the clouds.
That's the closest I've come to seeing a total eclipse, but here in Wisconsin, it was only partial, although a pretty good part. I think I might have damaged my night vision slightly that day...

I remember this one from when I grew up in Saskatchewan, it was partial but still pretty close.

Bad Dr Galaxy
2005-Mar-28, 11:18 PM
Alas, no.
I saw a 85% in 1963, and a 75% in the late '70s. That's as close as I
have gotten.

However, I knew an astronomer named Glenn Schneider in Maryland. He
is a fanatic about total solar eclipses. I believe there was a stretch where
he missed one in twenty years! Iceland, Siberia, Antarctica, he didn't
care! He was there! He's seen total solar eclipses a staggering 24 times
since 1970, plus three cloudouts! Here's his Umbraphillia webpage:

http://nicmosis.as.arizona.edu:8000/UMBRAPHILLIA.html

Bob B.
2005-Mar-28, 11:35 PM
However, I knew an astronomer named Glenn Schneider in Maryland. He is a fanatic about total solar eclipses. I believe there was a stretch where he missed one in twenty years! Iceland, Siberia, Antarctica, he didn't care! He was there! He's seen total solar eclipses a staggering 24 times since 1970, plus three cloudouts! Here's his Umbraphillia webpage:

http://nicmosis.as.arizona.edu:8000/UMBRAPHILLIA.html

I see from his Web page that he was on the Stellar Solaris on the Black Sea for the 1999 eclipse. I was right alongside his ship on the Olympic Countess. There were five ships that gathered together for the eclipse. I think the Stellar Solaris is one of those in the following photo:

http://www.braeunig.us/eclipse/1999/pics/eclipse_01.jpg

Russ
2005-Mar-29, 12:02 AM
I've seen several partials, never a total. I saw the partial in NYC in 63', the partial in CT, 70', biz trip in 79' can't remember where I was, partial in SC Christmas 02' (I think).

I was the local expert for the Christmas day one. Gathered a large crowd and got quite a number of BA questions. Maybe we should start listing the BA questions we've gotten associated with an eclips. Here's a partial from my last:

1) Now, will it be like this from now on?
2) Won't you go blind from looking at it? This interrupted a long look through my, properly filtered, telescope.
3) This is happening because the Sun is passing between us and the Moon?
4) This happens once a month, right?
5) Can this happen at night? by a cute little girl
6) Will this cause homing pidgeons to get lost? I had to confess I didn't know :lol:

A'a
2005-Mar-29, 12:22 AM
I've seen several partials, never a total. I saw the partial in NYC in 63', the partial in CT, 70', biz trip in 79' can't remember where I was, partial in SC Christmas 02' (I think).



Wasn't that one in 2000? I remember seeing a partial Christmas day eclipse on the east coast that year.

Messenger
2005-Mar-29, 01:51 AM
I was on an island off the coast of Costa Rica for the '91 eclipse. In the middle of the eclipse, a boatload of completely confused Norwegians pulled up next to me on the beach. I couldn't speak Norwegian, and they couldn't speak English, but I handed them my welder's glass; they all took a look, thanked me, and rowed away.

2005-Mar-29, 01:58 AM
Alas, no.
I saw a 85% in 1963, and a 75% in the late '70s. That's as close as I
have gotten.

However, I knew an astronomer named Glenn Schneider in Maryland. He
is a fanatic about total solar eclipses. I believe there was a stretch where
he missed one in twenty years! Iceland, Siberia, Antarctica, he didn't
care! He was there! He's seen total solar eclipses a staggering 24 times
since 1970, plus three cloudouts! Here's his Umbraphillia webpage:

http://nicmosis.as.arizona.edu:8000/UMBRAPHILLIA.html

For the Antarctic eclipse he did the navigational planning for both charter plane flights. He will be on a cruise ship near Tahiti for this one ... he was my doctoral student at UF but he never took me on one of his expeditions :-(

mickal555
2005-Mar-29, 08:26 AM
I want to but until I move out of home (in about 4-5 years), I have to wait for the eclipses to come to me. Is there anyway to find out if there will be any for brissie or perth?
This link (http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/SEatlas/SEatlas.html), and more specifically, this link (http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/SEatlas/SEatlas3/SEatlas2001.GIF) , depicts solar eclipses for many years in advance. Looks like a couple affecting Australia in 2012 and 2013. The only good one that hasn't allready happened looks to be the blue one up near darwin.... the other one happens in the middle of nowhere...

Yorkshireman
2005-Mar-29, 02:42 PM
I was on the Isles of Scilly, off Cornwall on 11 August 1999. Very cloudy, but just a few minutes before totality the clouds thinned just enough for us to see the eclipse take place.

The seagulls went mental, they all took off flying and screeching.

What people don't stress enough with eclipses is it's dark, but it's not like any kind of darkness you normally get. (Prior to this, I thought to myself - "big deal - it goes dark! Well, it goes dark every night. What's cool about that?") But there was a ring of daylight visible right round the horizon. You could tell you were at the centre of a giant, moving shadow.

The emergence from totality was the most spectacular part - it was just as if a giant dimmer-switch had been whacked back up. The whole land brightened in seconds.

The following day was a beautiful, cloudless August day...!

Spacewriter
2005-Mar-29, 03:33 PM
I saw the 1998 one from a cruise ship in the Caribbean. It was pretty cool!

Our eclipse roster:

1979 -- viewed from Wolf Point, Montaina
1990 -- viewed from an island in Helsinki Harbor, Finland
1991 -- partially clouded out, viewed from Big Island, HI
1998 -- Caribbean cruise ship near Aruba
1999 -- viewed from a biergarten in Garching, Germany

Spacewriter
2005-Mar-29, 03:38 PM
I saw the 1998 one from a cruise ship in the Caribbean. It was pretty cool!

Which ship? I was on the Ryndam ... weather was perfect, view was awsome.
At
http://www.astro.ufl.edu/~oliver/solareclipse1998/
I am the guy in the funny hat.

We were on the Statendam! Anchored near Aruba.

We sailed on the Ryndam around South America in 2001. I was the trip astronomer.

Small world!

Russ
2005-Mar-29, 04:43 PM
I've seen several partials, never a total. I saw the partial in NYC in 63', the partial in CT, 70', biz trip in 79' can't remember where I was, partial in SC Christmas 02' (I think).



Wasn't that one in 2000? I remember seeing a partial Christmas day eclipse on the east coast that year.

It is another sign I'm getting older. I can't remember for sure. I think you are correct though. It may well have been 2000. :roll:

yaohua2000
2005-Mar-29, 05:17 PM
NEVER :(

I've to wait until Friday July 6 09:08:40 UTC 2187 to see a total solar eclipse from my hometown. [1] (http://wikisource.org/wiki/Solar_eclipses_as_seen_from_Tianjin)

But fortunately, there will be such an eclipse can be seen only about 100 kilometers north to my hometown on 2035-Sep-02. [2] (http://wikisource.org/wiki/Solar_eclipses_as_seen_from_Beijing)

For a much recently total eclipse can be seen from my country, the one on 2009-Jul-22 in Hangzhou and Shanghai will be very nice for me. I think if I am in the country then, I will go there and see it. [3] (http://wikisource.org/wiki/Solar_eclipses_as_seen_from_Shanghai)

Moose
2005-Mar-29, 05:35 PM
I've never seen one, partial or total.

Either it's cloudy out, or it's not passing over my part of the world, etc, etc, etc.

There was one otherwise perfect opportunity when I was in elementary school. Clear skies, and I knew it was coming. Unfortunately, someone in charge apparently didn't think it was worthwhile to train the teachers on how to let us observe safely. We had to stay indoors. I was at the wrong end of the school to see anything through the windows.

Very vexing.

Mellow
2005-Mar-30, 03:24 PM
August 1999, I had spent the previous twenty five years waiting to see a total eclipse on my home soil. ever since I had read about it in a Patrick Moore book from around 1972.

Around 3 weeks prior to the event, I had a bad feling about the whole thing and decied to book a ferry across the English Channle (La Manche) to view the eclipse from France.

Good decision as it turned out, the Southwest of England was under cloud. We watched it happen on the television screens on board the ferry we were sailing on. We then ran up on deck to a clear blue sky 20 minutes north of Caen, sat on a chilly deck, and a few minutes later were rewarded with a great total eclipse and some poor digital camera images.

As we remembered the news from Penzance talking about an "eerie gloom from under the clouds" yes, we all felt a little smug.

jfribrg
2005-Mar-30, 04:13 PM
I've never seen one. When my son was 4 and just getting interested in Astronomy, we agreed that he would drive me to North Carolina in 2017 to watch the eclipse there. He is now 12.

My wife was in Bosnia in 1999 when the eclipse passed over. She was stuck in a meeting in a windowless room for the entire duration. :cry:

Andreas
2005-Apr-01, 02:32 AM
Saw the 1999 eclipse in Munich.

A classmate's parent had something to do with the renovation works on the patent office and so could get access to the construction site. Quite a bunch of us got together to watch the eclipse from the roof of an office building instead of the crowded streets and bridges.

The weather was uncertain all day and frustrated many people's hope to see the eclipse that day. Not for us, as the clouds fully cleared up just, dunno, half an hour or fifteen minutes or so before the totality. 8) Winds came up with the approach of the totality and when it finally arrived, the sound of the cheering crowds below in the streets. 8)

Beautiful. Especially as the view into the distance wasn't restricted much by buildings from our elevated vantage point. We could see the dark lands giving way to brighter ground in the far distance, against the backdrop of the sunlit Alps. :D

(And of course I just had to put on Nightwish's Sleeping Sun while writing this post. :))

Manekineko
2005-Apr-06, 10:29 AM
My wife was in Bosnia in 1999 when the eclipse passed over. She was stuck in a meeting in a windowless room for the entire duration. :cry:
I'm not sure the eclipse was total in Bosnia... I know my brother and his friends took me to Hungary, to Balaton to watch it. It was great, the clouds threatened but it cleared right on time...

Fram
2005-Apr-06, 11:43 AM
I have seen the 1999 full one from the north of France. There was a small part of Belgium where you had a total one as well, but for some reason, everyone in Belgium decided to go there instead of going to the north of France, where you had much more space.
We went to the top of a hill, in the middle of the fields. There were some twenty of thirty people on that hill that day.
It was cloudy all day, but there was only a thin layer of clouds when the eclipse happened, so we were able to see the sun and the eclipse without any glasses or filters or whatever for protection! We did have special eclipse glasses ready, but we didn't really need them. The disadvantage was that the light of the corona wasn't really strong enough to get through the clouds.
One of the fun parts of being on a hill was that you could see the shadow of the full eclipse getting closer. Apart from that, it was strange, how it went dark overhead but the horizon stayed more light, and everything went quiet... A weird experience.
I have seen one other partial eclipse in Belgium (can't remember when though, early nineties I think), and the night my sister married, there was a lunar eclipse. 8)

beskeptical
2005-Apr-07, 08:40 AM
I was on an island off the coast of Costa Rica for the '91 eclipse. In the middle of the eclipse, a boatload of completely confused Norwegians pulled up next to me on the beach. I couldn't speak Norwegian, and they couldn't speak English, but I handed them my welder's glass; they all took a look, thanked me, and rowed away.Sounds rather surreal.