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Candy
2005-Mar-27, 01:40 PM
I'm spending it with my cat at home all alone. I went to the gym at 630am, and they had a sign stating they will be open 8am-3pm. :evil:

I'm afraid those hours of operation won't work for me today. This is my first day off. I may go to sleep earlier than usual.

cyswxman
2005-Mar-27, 02:05 PM
I'll attend church this morning, sleepy though I will be since I've been at work for the last 9 hours, then sleep for the afternoon.

Grendl
2005-Mar-27, 04:49 PM
I'll repeat what I said on our forum and this is NOT intended to discuss religion in a debate-like manner:

It's not Easter for the Greeks until May 1st. But Happy Easter to you non-Greeks...

This year my family gets all the candy on sale!

I don't know if I'm going to pull my "atheist goes to church" thing again. Probably, since the people are so nice and the service is beautiful. Besides, I need to get my red egg, which of course symbolizes the pagan rituals of spring (ducks and runs).
http://images.bravenet.com/common/images/smilies/stirthepot.gif

Seriously, though, last year Greek Easter was at the same time as American Easter, as we say, but there's quite a gap this year. Greek Orthodox Easter services are VERY ritualistic, and I think they are the most beautiful. If you haven't attended Greek Easter services, I highly recommend doing so, especially on the Saturday night before Easter Sunday. It does involve staying up very late, however. In Houston, with the exception of the first part of the service needing to be held in their gym due to the size of the church's membership (the one on Yoakum St. Annunciation is the largest), 2/3 of the people drop out during the candle procession to the actual church--there were even empty pews at that point. They have a wonderful choir and it's very moving and last year there were many non-Greeks there.

Yes, I'm an odd atheist who likes visiting and studying church architecture and all, but the whole ritualistic aspect of Easter is comforting to me--it's what I know and singing in Greek is just familiar; since I am exiled in Houston, I feel like I'm with "my people". I even took communion last year (hey, I'm baptized, I can do that), which surprisingly made my parents happy (my step-mom thought I might change my mind if "I was infused with the body and blood of Christ"...whatever). When I was a baby, I loved the Port wine we used in communion and got drunk on Port wine at 3 years old. :o


Christos Anesti! to the religious folks here. :)

Candy, don't worry, I'm staying home alone today with my TWO cats, studying Spanish. My gato diablo is currently playing with my knee-hi eggs--you know those .99 cent ones they sell in Walgreens? The diablo stole them right out of the bag and I can't find two of them.

Chuck
2005-Mar-27, 07:52 PM
Snoopy's Easter (http://www.unitedmedia.com/comics/offthemark/archive/images/offthemark2005032348767.jpg)

Eta C
2005-Mar-28, 01:17 AM
Christos Anesti! to the religious folks here. :)



Alithos Anesti (a month early from another Greek.)

For those wondering about why there's a difference, There are two reasons. This year the major reason is that the Orthodox require that Easter come after Passover (in fact, the Greek word for Easter, Pascha, is a derivative of the Hebrew for Passover, Pesach). Since Passover is at the end of April this year, Easter comes in early May.

The second reason has to do with the date used to reckon the start of spring. Although the Greeks use the Gregorian calendar for all other dates (and therefore celebrate Christmas on 25 December along with everyone else) They use the old Julian calendar to determine the first day of spring. Thus Orthodox Easter can be no earlier that about 15 April, The Gregorian equivalent for the Julian 21 March). That's responsible for the usual one week difference.

P.S. I have to agree with you, Grendl, that the hymns sound better in Greek. This is partly due to the almost hypnotic nature of the Byzantine chant (take that Gregorians) but also due to the nature of the music. As anyone who's studied opera knows, the melodies have to match the natural rhythms of the language being set. When you try to shoehorn English words into a Greek melody you get a less than satisfactory match.

Tensor
2005-Mar-28, 01:28 AM
I'm spending it with my cat at home all alone. I went to the gym at 630am, and they had a sign stating they will be open 8am-3pm. :evil:

I'm afraid those hours of operation won't work for me today. This is my first day off. I may go to sleep earlier than usual.

Well, how would you like to spend it driving for 12 hours?

Note to Eta C: cool info.

mopc
2005-Mar-28, 02:14 AM
I ate rondelli and chicken!

Candy
2005-Mar-28, 06:20 AM
Snoopy's Easter (http://www.unitedmedia.com/comics/offthemark/archive/images/offthemark2005032348767.jpg)

Where's Woodstock? :o

:lol:

Candy
2005-Mar-28, 06:35 AM
Probably, since the people are so nice and the service is beautiful.
I'm a 'church' peeper, too. I went to the USAFA (United States Air Force Academy) in Colorado just to see THIS (http://atlas.usafa.af.mil/pa/factsheets/chapel.htm). I wish I could find some photos, because the pipe organs are beautiful. :D

Grendl
2005-Mar-28, 07:43 AM
Eta C: P.S. I have to agree with you, Grendl, that the hymns sound better in Greek. This is partly due to the almost hypnotic nature of the Byzantine chant (take that Gregorians) but also due to the nature of the music.
I was wondering when you'd show up, though I half expected you to chastise me for being a bad Greek. :wink:

As far the hymns, who doesn't sing them in Greek?? I've never been to a Greek Orthodox church that doesn't sing them in Greek--that's just not right. It would be like singing Ave Maria in English.

Thanks for telling them about the Julian calendar (bad Greek again).

BTW, I took good care of a customer who is friends with the owner of an upscale Greek restaurant here and I mentioned how hard it is to find a bottle of Katzimichalis Chardonnay in Houston. That restaurant has it, so I was pleasantly surprised with a bottle Friday at work (But, shhh, you're not supposed to do that). I have never been fond of most Greek wines, but in the last 10 years they've produced some good vintages--this is one of them, imho. It's Estate Hatzimichalis Chardonnay 2003 from the Atalante Valley, which is a bit north of Athens at the foot of Mt Parnassus. That region has a historical tradition with wine and Mt Parnassus is home of Bacchus, the ancient Greek God of Wine (Eta, I know you know this).

We should all have a god of wine! A good Port wine is still one of my favorites though.


Eta C, do you know why they alternate the spelling of Atalante and Atalanti? They even do it on the label.