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R.A.F.
2005-Mar-27, 06:17 PM
The Turner Classic Movies channel has on their schedule for April, something they are calling
April Fools (http://www.turnerclassicmovies.com/ThisMonth/Article/0,,92499|92500||,00.html)...consisting of dozens of old comedy movies played throughout the month.

Of particular interest to me (and to others here, I'm sure :)) is the schedule for 4/08, when they will be showing 11 out of the 14 Marx Bros. movies.

I can't wait...I love the Marx Brothers!!!

The Bad Astronomer
2005-Mar-27, 06:45 PM
Heh. I won a bag full of peanuts snack bags from Southwest airlines last year for being able to name 5 of the Marx brothers. Most fans can name the fourth, but the fifth? Heh heh heh. 8)

Herodotus
2005-Mar-27, 07:24 PM
Heh. I won a bag full of peanuts snack bags from Southwest airlines last year for being able to name 5 of the Marx brothers. Most fans can name the fourth, but the fifth? Heh heh heh. 8)

Maybe it would have been better to have made the prize gummy bears? :D

http://www.evl.uic.edu/pape/Marx/Gummo.html

R.A.F.
2005-Mar-28, 12:26 AM
Most fans can name the fourth, but the fifth? Heh heh heh. 8)

Now why am I not surprised that you know that? :wink:

N C More
2005-Mar-28, 12:36 AM
I think I know all 5 Marx Brothers; Groucho, Harpo, Chico, Zeppo and Gummo. Am I right? I'm going to goggle a bit and see if I'm correct!

Tensor
2005-Mar-28, 01:21 AM
I think I know all 5 Marx Brothers; Groucho, Harpo, Chico, Zeppo and Gummo. Am I right? I'm going to goggle a bit and see if I'm correct!

You missed Karl. :P

N C More
2005-Mar-28, 01:26 AM
We also missed this MARX (http://space.mit.edu/CXC/MARX/) :D

Maksutov
2005-Mar-28, 01:29 AM
When asked about my political persuasions, I usually reply, "I'm a Marxist-Lennonist." (http://www.geocities.com/vandenberghetroyka/Abkhaziastamp.html)

Tensor
2005-Mar-28, 01:32 AM
When asked about my political persuasions, I usually reply, "I'm a Marxist-Lennonist." (http://www.geocities.com/vandenberghetroyka/Abkhaziastamp.html)

I would have to agree with your politics there Maksutov. =D>

Maksutov
2005-Mar-28, 01:35 AM
OK, now...

Which one was Leonard, which one was Milton, which one was Julius, which one was Herbert, and which one was Adolph?

Child's play for the real fan... :D

Maksutov
2005-Mar-28, 01:40 AM
Without resorting to a book, the web, etc., name ALL their movies, including the lost one from the 20s and the "disaster" from the 50s where they all appeared in the film, but, due to an inspired decision by the producer (who was soon responsible for other "disasters"), each in a separate scene.

Bonus: which film from the 30s had a script that wasn't written for the Bros. Marx?

Mail your answers to:

Rufus T. Firefly
Casablanca, MO

Chip
2005-Mar-28, 01:59 AM
I love it in Monkey Business when the Marx's while being chased (as usual) on the ship, run past a bandstand, grab the instruments and quickly improvise a jaunty little jazzy ditty.

I got a great DVD set by Universal last Christmas. It comes with 5 movies plus a bonus disc and a well written booklet. Its called "The Marx Brothers Silver Screen Collection" and I recommend it highly. :D

N C More
2005-Mar-28, 02:22 AM
OK, now...

Which one was Leonard, which one was Milton, which one was Julius, which one was Herbert, and which one was Adolph?



Leonard...Chico

Milton...Gummo

Julius...Groucho

Herbert...Zeppo

Adolph...Harpo


Here's a little quiz (http://www.intelligentsianetwork.com/marx/marx.htm) :D

N C More
2005-Mar-28, 02:37 AM
Oh, I think I know this one as well.


Bonus: which film from the 30s had a script that wasn't written for the Bros. Marx?



Was it "Room Service" with Lucielle Ball?

Maksutov
2005-Mar-28, 03:03 AM
OK, now...

Which one was Leonard, which one was Milton, which one was Julius, which one was Herbert, and which one was Adolph?



Leonard...Chico

Milton...Gummo

Julius...Groucho

Herbert...Zeppo

Adolph...Harpo


Here's a little quiz (http://www.intelligentsianetwork.com/marx/marx.htm) :D
You got 'em.

Nice quiz...guess my score. What do you fellows get for playing? Ravelli: Ah, for playing we getta ten dollars an hour. Spaulding: I see. What do you get for not playing? Ravelli: Twelve dollars an hour. Spaulding: Well, clip me off a piece of that. Ravelli: Now...for rehearsing, we make a special rate, that'sa fifteen dollars an hour. Spaulding: That's for rehearsing. Ravelli: That'sa for rehearsing. Spaulding: And what do you get for not rehearsing? Ravelli: You couldn't afford it.

Maksutov
2005-Mar-28, 03:06 AM
Oh, I think I know this one as well.


Bonus: which film from the 30s had a script that wasn't written for the Bros. Marx?



Was it "Room Service" with Lucielle Ball?
You got it. Let's hear it for Harpo and the turkey!

Chip
2005-Mar-28, 05:48 AM
...You got it. Let's hear it for Harpo and the turkey!

Have you noticed that Harpo has a little piece of (stuffing?) on the end of his fork every time he puts the fork down non-stop and rapidly brings it up again during the "eating" scene? Harpo was one of the few human masters of cartoon physics!

Swift
2005-Mar-28, 03:21 PM
The Turner Classic Movies channel has on their schedule for April, something they are calling
April Fools (http://www.turnerclassicmovies.com/ThisMonth/Article/0,,92499|92500||,00.html)...consisting of dozens of old comedy movies played throughout the month.

Of particular interest to me (and to others here, I'm sure :)) is the schedule for 4/08, when they will be showing 11 out of the 14 Marx Bros. movies.

I can't wait...I love the Marx Brothers!!!
Wow! Thanks R.A.F. I love the Marx Brothers. This should be in the "You know you're getting old thread". When I was a kid (1960s), Saturday morning/afternoon TV would always show Marx Brothers and Laurel & Hardy movies.


Otis B. Driftwood: It's all right, tha-that's in every contract. Tha-that's what they call a sanity clause.
Fiorello: Ha ha ha ha ha ha... you can't fool me. There ain't no Sanity Clause.

Jim
2005-Mar-28, 05:44 PM
... the "disaster" from the 50s where they all appeared in the film, but, due to an inspired decision by the producer (who was soon responsible for other "disasters"), each in a separate scene.

The Story of Mankind.

Now, what was the last "movie" the Marx Bros ever made? Completely in pantomime until the very last scene.

Maksutov
2005-Mar-29, 12:45 AM
... the "disaster" from the 50s where they all appeared in the film, but, due to an inspired decision by the producer (who was soon responsible for other "disasters"), each in a separate scene.

The Story of Mankind.
You got it. Thank you Irwin Allen for splitting up the Brothers.


Now, what was the last "movie" the Marx Bros ever made? Completely in pantomime until the very last scene.
The Incredible Jewel Robbery on General Electric Theater in March, 1959. It's all silent Harpo and Chico until Groucho comes in right at the end and says


We aren't talking 'til we see our lawyer.

Then the You Bet Your Life duck comes down with a card that reads "End" and that's it. It's all over.

http://img31.exs.cx/img31/5737/theincrediblejewelrobbery114rz.th.jpg (http://img31.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img31&image=theincrediblejewelrobbery11 4rz.jpg)

A still from the show.

http://img31.exs.cx/img31/4094/theincrediblejewelrobbery210jg.th.jpg (http://img31.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img31&image=theincrediblejewelrobbery21 0jg.jpg)

The great cartoon Al Hirschfeld drew for the show.

Chip
2005-Mar-29, 07:23 AM
...The Incredible Jewel Robbery on General Electric Theater in March, 1959...

I actually saw that show for the very first time! :D I was in my pajamas eating dry Cheerios out of a Hopalong Cassidy bowl at the time. (No kidding.) :o

R.A.F.
2005-Mar-29, 01:43 PM
My favorite Grouchoism is from the movie Animal Crackers..."We took some pictures of the native girls, but they weren't developed. But we're going back again in a couple of weeks!" :lol:

Maksutov
2005-Mar-29, 02:32 PM
Top four (no, five) Groucho-isms (subject to change):

1. I never forget a face, but in your case I'll be glad to make an exception.

2. Remember men, we're fighting for this woman's honor; which is probably more than she ever did.

3. I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book.

4. Women should be obscene and not heard.

5. What do you say the three of us get married: You girls have everything, you're short and tall, and slim and stout, and blonde and brunette. And that's just the kind of girl I crave!

I need to go over to the Wikipedia and straighten those folks out re their "attributed to" section.

1. is from a movie, but I need to look it up (probably Duck Soup when Firefly is talking to Trentino).

2. is from Duck Soup.

3 and 4 aren't from movies, but are recalled in various biographies I have.

5. is from Animal Crackers.

But the bottom line is Whatever It Is, I'm Against It!

Eta C
2005-Mar-29, 03:01 PM
Another Groucho-ism, although variants have been attributed to others.

"I haven't stopped laughing since I picked up your book. Some day I intend to read it."

Or this one from Horse Feathers.

"I know, you're a woman who's had nothing but dirty breaks. Well, we can clean and tighten your brakes, but you'll have to stay in the garage all night."

Trivia question, who was that line addressed to, and why was it intensely ironic a couple of years later?

Swift
2005-Mar-29, 03:12 PM
How about favorite Harpo-isms, such as: Honk, honk, honk.

Or who can forget: Honk whistle ..........honk honk.

#-o 8-[

Maksutov
2005-Mar-29, 03:28 PM
Another Groucho-ism, although variants have been attributed to others.

"I haven't stopped laughing since I picked up your book. Some day I intend to read it."

Or this one from Horse Feathers.

"I know, you're a woman who's had nothing but dirty breaks. Well, we can clean and tighten your brakes, but you'll have to stay in the garage all night."

Trivia question, who was that line addressed to, and why was it intensely ironic a couple of years later?
Quincy Adams Wagstaff (Groucho) said it to Connie Bailey, the college widow (played by Thelma Todd, a first-class babe). The irony is Thelma Todd was found dead in her car, parked in a garage, in December, 1935. Court said suicide due to carbon monoxide poisoning, others thought differently (sorry, per Apple, different).

R.A.F.
2005-Mar-29, 03:56 PM
...5. What do you say the three of us get married: You girls have everything, you're short and tall, and slim and stout, and blonde and brunette. And that's just the kind of girl I crave!

...another favorite of mine, especially the "way" that Groucho says the word crave. :)


But the bottom line is Whatever It Is, I'm Against It!

My wife is not at all happy that I love singing this song. :lol:

Swift
2005-Mar-29, 04:29 PM
But the bottom line is Whatever It Is, I'm Against It!

My wife is not at all happy that I love singing this song. :lol:
I'll break into it once in a while and my wife will give that "I know this is some sort of joke for you, probably from some old movie, but I don't get it" look. I guess a wife with bemused ignorance is better than one that is unhappy. :wink:

Maksutov
2005-Mar-29, 04:44 PM
But the bottom line is Whatever It Is, I'm Against It!

My wife is not at all happy that I love singing this song. :lol:
I'll break into it once in a while and my wife will give that "I know this is some sort of joke for you, probably from some old movie, but I don't get it" look. I guess a wife with bemused ignorance is better than one that is unhappy. :wink:
I guess I'm lucky. My ex-wife and a later girlfriend were both Marx Brothers fans. In fact, the first kiss I ever got from that girlfriend was when I asked her where she got the nice picture of Groucho that she had hanging over her fireplace.

Her response was, "You know who that is? You know who Groucho Marx is? Wow, I could just kiss you!" And she did, as she leaped into my arms.

My wife and I attended the Connecticut premier of the re-released version of Animal Crackers in Orange, CT in 1974. We were among the first in line. Wow, what memories! And Groucho was still around then to soak up the glory!

(sigh...)

N C More
2005-Mar-29, 06:38 PM
(sigh...)

Now, now don't feel too old. Remember the immortal words of Groucho, "You're only as old as the woman you feel". :D

Swift
2005-Mar-29, 07:28 PM
(sigh...)

Now, now don't feel too old. Remember the immortal words of Groucho, "You're only as old as the woman you feel". :D
Now that's depressing; my wife is 7 years older than me!
:wink:

Maksutov
2005-Mar-29, 07:45 PM
(sigh...)

Now, now don't feel too old. Remember the immortal words of Groucho, "You're only as old as the woman you feel". :D
Now that's depressing; my wife is 7 years older than me!
:wink:
Well, either it's all relative (you should be ashamed of yourself!), or it's time for a recalibration!

Hey, don't let it get you down. Go out and have some fun! Remember, behind every successful man is a woman, behind her is his wife.

You should be so lucky!


:D

N C More
2005-Mar-29, 08:02 PM
(sigh...)

Now, now don't feel too old. Remember the immortal words of Groucho, "You're only as old as the woman you feel". :D
Now that's depressing; my wife is 7 years older than me!
:wink:

Wow! :o Hitting on hot older chicks!...then marrying one! =D>

Chip
2005-Mar-29, 11:21 PM
How about favorite Harpo-isms, such as: Honk, honk, honk. Or who can forget: Honk whistle ..........honk honk. #-o 8-[

HAHAHAHA! That's good!

Harpo actually "made a speech" in one film. (It consisted of drinking lots and lots of water.)

Of course he expressed himself well with a harp, and a clarinet in one scene in Coconuts.

Jim
2005-Mar-30, 01:27 PM
Harpo had a wonderfully expressive face. He was able to display his thoughts and emotions, and deliver a punchline, with it.

But, did you ever notice how serious his expression became when he was playing the harp? (The only exception was when he was playing for comic effect, and used his expressions as punctuation.) This was always the part of every Marx Bros movie I eagerly anticipated.

Swift
2005-Mar-30, 01:33 PM
Harpo had a wonderfully expressive face. He was able to display his thoughts and emotions, and deliver a punchline, with it.

But, did you ever notice how serious his expression became when he was playing the harp? (The only exception was when he was playing for comic effect, and used his expressions as punctuation.) This was always the part of every Marx Bros movie I eagerly anticipated.
Harpo was/is always my favorite. How could you not love the sad, little clown. He could say more with his face than most people could with a speach. A Russian gentleman told me many years ago that he was very popular in Russia, his humor was beyond words.

I think both he and Chico were pretty serious about their music and decent enough to have been professional musicians. I also loved those parts of the movies.

Maksutov
2005-Mar-30, 05:52 PM
Harpo had a wonderfully expressive face. He was able to display his thoughts and emotions, and deliver a punchline, with it.

But, did you ever notice how serious his expression became when he was playing the harp? (The only exception was when he was playing for comic effect, and used his expressions as punctuation.) This was always the part of every Marx Bros movie I eagerly anticipated.
Harpo was/is always my favorite. How could you not love the sad, little clown. He could say more with his face than most people could with a speach. A Russian gentleman told me many years ago that he was very popular in Russia, his humor was beyond words.[edit]
Here's the poster for Harpo's appearance at the Leningrad Music Hall in 1933.

http://img185.exs.cx/img185/2554/harpoinleningrad1cd.th.jpg (http://img185.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img185&image=harpoinleningrad1cd.jpg)

The story is that the Russian audience didn't "get it". They refused to understand anything he did, except for his playing the harp. He treated them to the knife-dropping bit and the lobby scene from The Cocoanuts where he drank ink and threw darts. The audience remained silent. They wanted to know what the"purpose" of what he was doing was.

Before the next performance Harpo (XАРПО МАРКС) got two Russian writers (whom he nicknamed "George S. Kaufmanski" and "Morrie Ryskindov") to create a "story" that explained his actions. Harpo had no idea what the Russian-language "story" was. For ten minutes he would stand around while a doctor, a girl, and a jealous husband declaimed about something or other, then they'd give him a signal, and he'd do his act. The response was delirious laughter.

Performing pantomime in a foreign language must have been quite an experience, but Harpo didn't even know what character he was playing! But he (finally) got the laughs!

Maksutov
2005-Mar-30, 06:19 PM
One other movie TCM will be playing during this time period is a film which is one of the blackest, most unsentimental, nothing-held-sacred, ironic comedies of all time, featuring Alec Guinness in eight roles and Dennis Price as the single-minded protagonist, and which has the most unlikely of titles for such a dark satire: Kind Hearts and Coronets.

One of the best productions ever from Ealing Studios, it's scheduled for for 1:00 AM (CST) Saturday morning (4/2) or 11 PM (PST) Friday night (4/1), so set the timer on your PVR.

http://img218.exs.cx/img218/7803/thedascoynesallplayedbyalecgui.th.jpg (http://img218.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img218&image=thedascoynesallplayedbyale cgui.jpg)

Alec Guinness/Alec Guinness/etc.

slbuczkowski
2005-Mar-30, 06:26 PM
We also missed this MARX (http://space.mit.edu/CXC/MARX/) :D

Clearly, the finest member of the Marx family! =D>

Chip
2005-Mar-31, 09:32 AM
Kind Hearts and Coronets...

A marvelous and wonderfully droll film. Alec Guinness is worth a separate thread. The Captain's Paradise is another comedy that, for its time, crosses many boundaries.
And then there's the greatest comedy ever made about a scientist, (and the ugly ways of big business): The Man in the White Suit.

Maksutov
2005-Apr-02, 03:53 PM
Anyone catch Kind Hearts and Coronets last night?

This time around the musical aspect of the film came to the forefront. For example, in the opening credits, which include this wonderful shot of the Alec Guinness roles (as well as Joan Greenwood who has always been a unanimous inductee into Hall of Babedom)

http://img219.exs.cx/img219/585/kindhearts16es.th.jpg (http://img219.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img219&image=kindhearts16es.jpg)

the music playing is "Il mio tesoro intanto", an aria sung by Don Ottavio in Mozart's Don Giovanni.

http://img158.exs.cx/img158/2632/kindhearts21me.th.jpg (http://img158.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img158&image=kindhearts21me.jpg)

This may be seen (heard) by most as a prissy, almost priggish musical overlay to the upper-class struggle we are about to witness.

But on closer analysis, it's just the right music for the movie, in support of the plot. It occurs at the start during the opening credits, during the movie (sung by Louis' father), and over the ending scroll. The words to the aria give it away:

The Scene:

Act II
Don Ottavio promises to avenge the wrongdoings of Don Giovanni.

In other words, the great nobleman is to be the subject of revenge by the lesser nobility. Translate "nobleman" to "noblepersons", and the plot is afoot.

The Lyrics:

Italian

Il mio tesoro intanto
andate a consolar,
E del bel ciglio il pianto
cercate di asciugar.
Ditele che i suoi torti
a vendicar io vado
Che sol di stragi e morti
nunzio vogl'io tornar.

English

Meantime go and
console my dearest one,
and seek to dry the tears
from her lovely eyes.
Tell her that I have gone
to avenge her wrongs,
and will return only as the messenger.

Anyone who knows the music then knows the motivation of the "hero". Louis sets out to avenge the wrongs to his mother, as forecasted by the opening tune and sung aria.

That the movie contains incredible acting and a script so literate it could only be British, well, those are more icing on the cake!

R.A.F.
2005-Apr-02, 04:06 PM
Anyone catch Kind Hearts and Coronets last night?

After your previous alert, I "was" going to record it...but totally forgot as we had just returned to town from visiting friends and I was just too tired to remember. DOH!

Edited to add...I do see that it's playing 3 more times this month...YIPPIE!!! :)

Chip
2005-Apr-03, 02:18 AM
Anyone catch Kind Hearts and Coronets last night?

"I'm from the magazine "Tidbits." I'm inquiring as to the rights to the publication of your memoirs."

"My memoirs?" ... "My memoirs..." . . . "My...memoirs..."

(oops) :wink:

Sam5
2005-Apr-03, 02:40 AM
Maksutov, thanks for the background info about the music.

Sam5
2005-Apr-03, 02:45 AM
"My...memoirs..."

(oops) :wink:

That ending was required by the British film code back then.

Maksutov
2005-Apr-08, 05:19 AM
The Turner Classic Movies channel has on their schedule for April, something they are calling
April Fools (http://www.turnerclassicmovies.com/ThisMonth/Article/0,,92499|92500||,00.html)...consisting of dozens of old comedy movies played throughout the month.

Of particular interest to me (and to others here, I'm sure :)) is the schedule for 4/08, when they will be showing 11 out of the 14 Marx Bros. movies.

I can't wait...I love the Marx Brothers!!!
A reminder...

Friday morning (tomorrow) is the start of the Marx Brothers marathon. The Cocoanuts kicks it off at 6:30 AM EDT.

R.A.F.
2005-Apr-08, 11:48 AM
The Cocoanuts kicks it off at 6:30 AM EDT.

Hmmm...interesting. Here on the west coast it starts at 5:30 pacific time (in about 45 minutes). I wonder what's up with that?

Anyhow, I'm all ready!!! I haven't seen these movies in a few years and i'm wondering if they have been "re-furbished" so to speak.

Candy
2005-Apr-10, 02:43 PM
Not slap stick humor, but humor, none-the-less. Top Hat with Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, and Edward Everett Horton is playing right now. I used to idolize Fred Astaire when I was younger, and I believe I have seen all of his movies. I'm not sure why I like Mr. Astaire so much. :wink: