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jrkeller
2005-Mar-29, 02:49 AM
I saw this article (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=514&e=17&u=/ap/20050328/ap_on_he_me/fit_burger_king_breakfast) and gained two pounds just reading about it.

Superluminal
2005-Mar-29, 03:10 AM
Is it me, or has anyone else notice this? I'm on the road alot, sometimes I pull into a convieniance store to grab a snack to hold me over until I get home. But the small bags of chips that usually go for .30 cents are hard to find. All I can find are what they call big grabs or super grabs. By the time I pay for a soda, big grab and maybe a candy bar, I've already paid nearly what a value meal at Mac Ds would cost. So I usually don't eat or go ahead and eat at a fast food place.

And why is it, that if you go to a fast food place, buying just a sandwich cost nearly the same as buying the value meal? So you go ahead and buy the meal, with FF a large drink. That's really good for your waistline.

W.F. Tomba
2005-Mar-29, 03:26 AM
On the rare occasions when I have to eat fast food, I try to practice "fast food discipline". The menu is packed with opportunities to spend more and eat more. It takes a certain amount of thought to resist this. A key mistake to avoid is the "more for your money" trap. The "value meal" is priced only slightly higher than the sandwich alone but also includes fries and a drink, so you get "more for your money". The key is to remind yourself that you're still paying more money and getting too much food, both of which are negative things, so there is no actual advantage to the value meal. In fact, considering the low price of fast food and the importance of not overeating, paying more money to get less food would actually be a good deal.

These are the kind of calculations that I perform every time I enter a Wendy's or a Burger King, and I have found them very useful. I also make a point of skipping the fries, getting the smallest size drink (or drinking bottled water instead of soft drinks), and holding the mayonnaise on chicken sandwiches.

Brady Yoon
2005-Mar-29, 03:33 AM
When I go to fast food restaurants, I usually take the medium size stuff, enough to feed me but not enough to kill me. For example, at In n Out, a cheeseburger with fries and a medium drink. It's a routine that I get a Sprite or a Mountain Dew wherever I go, though.

Adding onto what W.F. Tomba said, I think fast food is actually more expensive than it seems like. If I go, I usually spend 4-5 dollars, which is almost as much as a $6-8 warm meal I can get at a sit down restaurant.

peter eldergill
2005-Mar-29, 03:55 AM
Try splitting a combo meal with a friend/wife and getting one extra burger or something

If you haven't done so already, check out "Super Size Me". A very funny movie, but has a point to make and make sure it makes that point. Even with that, I really enjoyed the movie

L8R

Pete

Inferno
2005-Mar-29, 04:30 AM
On the rare occasions when I have to eat fast food, I try to practice "fast food discipline". The menu is packed with opportunities to spend more and eat more. It takes a certain amount of thought to resist this. A key mistake to avoid is the "more for your money" trap. The "value meal" is priced only slightly higher than the sandwich alone but also includes fries and a drink, so you get "more for your money". The key is to remind yourself that you're still paying more money and getting too much food, both of which are negative things, so there is no actual advantage to the value meal. In fact, considering the low price of fast food and the importance of not overeating, paying more money to get less food would actually be a good deal.

These are the kind of calculations that I perform every time I enter a Wendy's or a Burger King, and I have found them very useful. I also make a point of skipping the fries, getting the smallest size drink (or drinking bottled water instead of soft drinks), and holding the mayonnaise on chicken sandwiches.

That's a good point. I use to always get the "large" meal for a takeaway meal at lunch. It was only AUS$1 more, but you got heaps more. After a while, however, I realised I din't enjoy eating that much and always felt like I'd eaten too much. Now I stick to the small.

TriangleMan
2005-Mar-29, 11:50 AM
If you haven't done so already, check out "Super Size Me". A very funny movie, but has a point to make and make sure it makes that point.
Recently at the local film festival I saw another documentary, McLibel, about two British activists who get sued for libel by McDonalds. It was very good so I'm hoping it gets some mainstream theather play. If you have an opportunity to watch it do so. (The director from Super Size Me and the author of Fast Food Nation are also in it.)

Captain Kidd
2005-Mar-29, 12:08 PM
Through college I worked at a gas station. I entertained myself by trying to find the wose thing for you there.

There's a line of breakfast "pies". (turnovers? That sounds right…) They’re about 6 x 4 inches and a couple thick. The fillings are apple, lemon, and chocolate. The chocolate was the worse, of course, weighing in at over 600 calories! This is for ONE of those breakfast snacks about the size of my calculator. The rest of the stuff on the nutrition panel was horrifying too. Sugar, carbs, and other items were 25-50% of your recommended daily intake!

Those things sold like mad too. I pointed the info to a friend that bought them all the time; he got a sour face and quite buying them. He also told me to quit showing him that stuff as his next selection was nearly as bad.

Bottom line, never, ever, buy food at a convenience store if you can help it.

gethen
2005-Mar-29, 02:00 PM
When there's absolutely no avoiding it, and I must eat at a fast food restaurant, I generally order a kids' meal. It's plenty of food for a small adult like myself, but it's way too much food and fat for for a 7 year old.

Swift
2005-Mar-29, 02:01 PM
It is not just fast-food restaurants in the US. A lot of "family" type restaurants also super-size their portions. Then you eat in Europe or elsewhere and see what normal-sized portions look like #-o

Somehow, this cartoon (http://www.nearingzero.net/screen_res/nz336.jpg) seems very appropriate.

Andromeda321
2005-Mar-29, 03:34 PM
Swift, the link doesn't work.
By the way I just showed this article to my roommate. After looking at the nutrition guides for various fast food resteraunts she's decided to "fatten me up" and is gonna make me eat a double quarter pounder value meal at McDonald's this weekend... 8-[
Dunno if I can but I shall try my best.

NoXion
2005-Mar-29, 03:36 PM
There's this little family-run establishment in the town I live in (Rhyl) called the Rumblin' Tum.
They do a full English breakfast called the 'Belly Buster' It contains the following:

2 Fried eggs
4 Rashers of bacon
3 Sausages
A heap of beans
1 Slice of Black Pudding
4 Plum Tomatos
2 Slices of fried bread
4 slices of buttered toast
A mug of tea or coffee (about 6 1/2 inches tall)

It goes without saying that it is supremely delicious, and really does fill you up for the rest of the day.

Me, I like my big portions. And I'm not fat, (In fact you can see my ribs) but this has more to do with my youthfulness and high metabolism rather than level of activity.

And right now I'm having the other half of a 16" (Yes you read that correctly) square pizza I ordered last night. With all toppings.

Yum.

Spacewriter
2005-Mar-29, 03:41 PM
WE've finally gotten in the habit of eating half of what's served at a restaurant and bringing the rest home for later lunch or snack. Even if I order only an appetizer and soup (no jokes about cheap dates!) it's still almost a full meal.

Swift
2005-Mar-29, 04:32 PM
Swift, the link doesn't work.
By the way I just showed this article to my roommate. After looking at the nutrition guides for various fast food resteraunts she's decided to "fatten me up" and is gonna make me eat a double quarter pounder value meal at McDonald's this weekend... 8-[
Dunno if I can but I shall try my best.
Won't let me do the picture either....
This (http://www.nearingzero.net/) is the home page. Then go to "Last few cartoons" and NZ336 "Epidemics".

Maksutov
2005-Mar-29, 04:32 PM
Question:

Has anyone (say, under threat of violence, etc.) actually forced you to eat more than what you know you want/like to eat, or what you know is what you should/like to eat?

If not, then who is responsible here?

Would it be the fatty fast-food folks who court you with their "You're part of the 'In-crowd'" commercials which are a variation on peer pressure, or your inability to discern between the world as presented in commercials and what's real?

It's pretty obvious to those of us who don't fall for the Mad Avenue gimmicks. Unfortunately there are a few judges out there who can't see the difference.

Until food consumption is administered a la the anti-ultra-violence videos in A Clockwork Orange, then there's only one place to look for responsibility.

Time for some self-appraisal here, folks.

Swift
2005-Mar-29, 04:37 PM
As you said Maksutov, the fault lies within our selves, not within the stars of the fast-food industry (to butcher Mr. Shakespeare). But it would be nice if the restaurant industry helped us out a little more. It is starting, for example, Wendy's let you get a salad instead of fries for your combos, but they certainly don't make it easy.

Captain Kidd
2005-Mar-29, 06:05 PM
I’m going to play a little bit of devil’s advocate here.

Fist, there’s the 10-20 minute lag between the stomach filling up and the brain receiving the signal that you’re full. However, knowing it’s there, one should plan for it accordingly.

But, my main point I wanted to get to was this. My father grew up in the Depression and my mother was born after it (I was a wee bit of a surprise). Both of them remembered not having that much food and the first rule of eating was that you eat what’s put in front of you. That got planted deep into their psyche and became an unbreakable habit. Additionally, since that’s how they grew up, that’s how they taught their child, i.e. me. Same went for their siblings. “You’re not excused from the table until you clean your plate.” Fortunately I managed to “break the habit.”

Additionally, there are a lot of childhood engrained lessons to eat everything. Who here, especially the Americans, hasn’t heard the old question “are you going to leave that when there are children starving in <insert-third-world-country>?” Again, I believe it to be a Depression-based believe/habit.

Now, this mainly comes into effect in sit-down entrée restaurants. At fast food joints you can basically get your meals à la carte and size it accordingly.

Bounced Check
2005-Mar-29, 06:16 PM
Question:

Has anyone (say, under threat of violence, etc.) actually forced you to eat more than what you know you want/like to eat, or what you know is what you should/like to eat?

If not, then who is responsible here?

Would it be the fatty fast-food folks who court you with their "You're part of the 'In-crowd'" commercials which are a variation on peer pressure, or your inability to discern between the world as presented in commercials and what's real?

It's pretty obvious to those of us who don't fall for the Mad Avenue gimmicks. Unfortunately there are a few judges out there who can't see the difference.

Until food consumption is administered a la the anti-ultra-violence videos in A Clockwork Orange, then there's only one place to look for responsibility.

Time for some self-appraisal here, folks.

Bravo! I do eat at fast food places, but a normal cheese burger and a small order of french fries will do nicely. And on the VERY odd occasion when going to a resturant I will always be the one carrying out well over half the food rather than waste it.

And I can stop any of my family and freinds from allowing themselves to become gluttons or to waste the food. In Vietnam I shared one set of rations with a family who put my squad up in their hut during a monsoon. The family of four shared that "canned crap" as we loved to call it. And they were so grateful that they practically forced me to take a gift - A small set of prayer beads that I wear to this day.

They were starving while we have the ability to fill entire dumpsters with untouched food at closing time for a resturant. I've made it a personal crusade to go to resturants and try to arrange for them to donate their excess food to local shelters. I do the driving and do it with a smile.

Grey
2005-Mar-29, 06:49 PM
It is not just fast-food restaurants in the US. A lot of "family" type restaurants also super-size their portions. Then you eat in Europe or elsewhere and see what normal-sized portions look like #-o
I think that many restaurants have realized that, given the cost of paying employees, rent on the building, utilities, and so forth, the cost of the actual food isn't the largest expense in running a restaurant. So it's relatively inexpensive for them to increase the portion size, hoping to make you feel like you're getting a good deal, and so eat there more often.

Like Spacewriter, I just expect to have leftovers for lunch or dinner the next day, but I expect many people were indeed taught to eat whatever is in front of them. I have a friend who's fairly overweight who mentioned once that when he was growing up, if there was a little bit of something still left when everyone was done with dinner, his mother would always encourage him to finish it up rather than let it go to waste.

farmerjumperdon
2005-Mar-29, 06:51 PM
Rather than go on a long diatribe, I would recommend "Fast Food Nation" as the best read on the topic. Well researched, thought provoking, and sometimes downright entertaining. The thing that struck me most about the fast food business is how it has effected us in so many ways other than what and how we eat.

W.F. Tomba
2005-Mar-29, 08:27 PM
Question:

Has anyone (say, under threat of violence, etc.) actually forced you to eat more than what you know you want/like to eat, or what you know is what you should/like to eat?

If not, then who is responsible here?

Would it be the fatty fast-food folks who court you with their "You're part of the 'In-crowd'" commercials which are a variation on peer pressure, or your inability to discern between the world as presented in commercials and what's real?

It's pretty obvious to those of us who don't fall for the Mad Avenue gimmicks. Unfortunately there are a few judges out there who can't see the difference.

Until food consumption is administered a la the anti-ultra-violence videos in A Clockwork Orange, then there's only one place to look for responsibility.

Time for some self-appraisal here, folks.
Responsibility isn't a zero-sum game. Of course I am responsible for what I eat; that's why (as I said above) I make these decisions carefully, and that's how I've managed to lose about forty pounds in the past seven months. But the food business is responsible for their actions, too, and they deserve my censure for trying very hard to overcome my willpower and break my good habits.

In the same vein, it is wrong to repeatedly offer cigarettes to someone when you know he is trying to quit, despite the fact that the smoker is ultimately responsible for his own decision to smoke or not smoke.

My responsibility for my actions does not absolve others of responsibility for theirs.

Zachary
2005-Mar-29, 11:27 PM
I saw this article (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=514&e=17&u=/ap/20050328/ap_on_he_me/fit_burger_king_breakfast) and gained two pounds just reading about it.

Arg, what's with the units? Calories? That means nothing to me - bring back the Joule!! :evil:

Anyways, 730 calories is nothing. Maybe I should get obese off McDonals food and then sue them for false advertising, as they claim their products contain x calories (or joules if the outlet has a progressive manager :lol: ), when it should be kilocalories...

Madcat
2005-Mar-30, 02:35 AM
Actually, it's not ABSURDLY big. I need about 3000 calories a day to maintain my weight so this thing isn't all that much. I could theoretically eat one for breakfast, have a glass of OJ with it, and still be on track to eat a normal lunch and dinner. (I'm pretty active, and yes, most people should eat less than this, but not dramatically less. 2000 calories is based on a relatively small woman in her 20's. Does this describe you? If so post pics! :wink: )

Of course, it's not HEALTHY seeing as its probably dripping with saturated fat. But that's not really the same thing as fattening. The real problem with society isn't that we eat a lot at meals, it's that we eat a lot between them.[/i]

paulie jay
2005-Mar-30, 04:10 AM
When it comes to blame I do blame the restaurants to a significant degree. The continual campaign of upselling borders on harrassment in my opinion. Point in question
"I'd like a small burger meal please"
"Would you like to upsize to large for 70 cents?" (note, no mention of the medium size meal)
"If I asked for small what makes you think I really wanted large?"
"Well you get all this extra stuff"
"So you want me to pay more money for something I don't want?"
"But it's only 70 cents"
They all but insinuate that you are an idiot for not taking up the offer. Some have even rolled their eyes at me or let out gasps of amazement that I'm daring to turn down the offer. I shouldn't have to have an argument everytime I want to buy something to eat. These days I have to say "I'd like a chicken burger only please, and I don't want to upsize, I don't want fries and I don't want a drink"
"Do you want a burger meal for an extra 20 cents?"
"What did I just say to you??"

Having said all that I also feel that people should take responsibility for their own eating habits - but I can also see how people are being bludgeoned into accepting larger servings. I mean what kind of idiot wouldn't upsize for only 70 cents?? Well, me for one! :wink:

spelling edit

Jpax2003
2005-Mar-30, 05:22 AM
The restaurants are partly responsible. A person can't know what is in every single item at every single restaurant that they may visit. If one is familiar with homemade burgers made with lean meat they may not anticipate the nutritional value of a fast food burger.

It reminds me of an old Garfield cartoon. Garfied the cat looks rather ill and Jon the owner suggests that it was something he ate. The lightbulb flashes and Garfield swipes at Jon saying "you mean it was something you fed me!"

farmerjumperdon
2005-Mar-30, 01:46 PM
I concur strongly on their upselling. I occassionally eat fast food, but I don't like fires and don't drink pop. They are often aghast when I just want the sandwich. One of them actually urged me on with the statement that the drink and fries only cost me another 60 cents or something. Their little hard-wired McBrain could not handle the fact that someone in the world does not eat fries, much less that 60 cents for something I'm not going to consume is a waste of 60 cents. On the other hand, I have the ability to say no.

What does bother me is that they market directly to kids, who do not have the wisdom, maturity, or judgement to know any better. Marketing anything to little kids is evil. Cigarettes, fast food, cars, anything.

captain swoop
2005-Mar-30, 02:24 PM
Along the Market Place in Guisborough are 4 Take-Aways that sell Kebabs, Pizzas and Burgers. If you buy a burger it includes fries as standard, you don't get e discount if you don't want the fries. They mainly cater to the Post-Pub trade in the evenings and the school/college lunch trade.

We also have 2 Chinese take-aways, and Indian and 3 Fish and Chip shops. althought the latter close at around 9pm.

Maksutov
2005-Mar-30, 02:27 PM
The restaurants are partly responsible. A person can't know what is in every single item at every single restaurant that they may visit. If one is familiar with homemade burgers made with lean meat they may not anticipate the nutritional value of a fast food burger.

It reminds me of an old Garfield cartoon. Garfied the cat looks rather ill and Jon the owner suggests that it was something he ate. The lightbulb flashes and Garfield swipes at Jon saying "you mean it was something you fed me!"
Actually that information for almost all the popular restaurants in the US is readily available on the web and at restaurants.

Some of the information is from the individual companies:

Burger King (http://www.bk.com/Food/Nutrition/NutritionWizard/index.aspx)

Denny's (http://www.dennys.com/en/cms/Nutrition%2FAllergens/23.html)

Lone Star Steakhouse (http://www.lonestarsteakhouse.com/nutrients.asp)

McDonald's (http://www.mcdonalds.com/app_controller.nutrition.index1.html)

Outback Steak House (http://www.outbacksteakhouse.com/ourmenu/nutrition.asp)

Subway (http://www.subwaynutrition.com/) (one of my favorite places)

Taco Bell (http://www.tacobell.com/nutrition.htm)

Wendy's (http://www.wendys.com/food/US_nutrition_topics.jsp)

Wendy's has a section of the site called "Build-A-Meal".


We want to make sure you have all the information you need to make smart choices when you order Wendy's great-tasting food. Use the handy food calculator below to put together your favorite meal combinations and view each meal's nutrition information.

White Castle (http://www.whitecastle.com/_pages/nutrition.asp) Hey, Charlie in Dayton! :)

Also nutritional information may be easily obtained from clearing houses such as dietfacts.com (http://www.dietfacts.com/fastfood.asp) (info for about 300 restaurants) and NutritionData (http://www.nutritiondata.com/).

It's just a matter of taking the time to do a little research and make a few decisions.

N C More
2005-Mar-30, 02:42 PM
Knowing what you're eating is very important, one of the main reasons I do just about all of my own cooking. I even read the dog food labels...you can't be too careful!

captain swoop
2005-Mar-30, 02:50 PM
Knowing what you're eating is very important, one of the main reasons I do just about all of my own cooking. I even read the dog food labels...you can't be too careful!


You eat dog food? :o

Maksutov
2005-Mar-30, 03:12 PM
Knowing what you're eating is very important, one of the main reasons I do just about all of my own cooking. I even read the dog food labels...you can't be too careful!


You eat dog food? :o
All of us senior citizens and AARPers eat dog food...it's a well-known fact. :wink:

http://www.click-smilies.de/sammlung0304/tiere/animal-smiley-049.gif

jrkeller
2005-Mar-31, 02:58 AM
Here's some more fun facts (http://www.annecollins.com/calories/calories-french-fries.htm)about french fries.

N C More
2005-Mar-31, 03:11 AM
You eat dog food? :o

Well, I'm certainly no "Miss America" but I don't think I'd be classified as a *dog* per say.

However, my two collies are pretty fond of dog food. I check what ingredients are used in making the kibble. Believe it or not, all dog food is not created equal, so to speak. Dogs who eat "junk food" kibble end up with similar health problems as people who eat human "junk food"!

Jpax2003
2005-Mar-31, 05:11 AM
It's just a matter of taking the time to do a little research and make a few decisions.I know, but most people don't do that for single meal. They should, to be sure, but they don't. However, there are some people who would equate using saturated fats as akin to using cyanide as a cooking ingredient and that the blame for such a poisoning should not rest on the restaurant since it made that information available to the customers. Come to think about it, I think such arguments are made in the case of cigarettes. I'm not saying it's right or wrong, but all fast foods are not made equal and so one's familiarity with a similar item may be grossly out of proportion to the item in hand.

Take apples. People know what to expect in an apple. Perhaps people also think they know what to expect in a hamburger and fries, but are wrong. Like many advocates say, it's all about portion size.

Actually, I think it's all about activity level. When I worked construction I would eat several fruits for breakfast, two 1/3-pounder bacon cheeseburgers from the local drive-in with fries and a coke, and then a big family dinner later that night and I lost weight. Of course roofin' was hard work. Now I eat maybe a quarter of that and I gain, of course I'm not as active.