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astronomo flaquito
2005-Apr-01, 01:01 AM
It rained yesterday evening here for the first time since last October. Not too much, 1.5cm, but anything is better than nothing. It was very welcome because we've been having very hot weather that has, added to the dry conditions (and with the help of some very ignorant and/or bad people), resulted in a spate of forest fires in the mountains. Last week I thought I'd get called up to go fight one that was approaching our town, but it was brought under control before they had to call in more folks. Whew! Yesterday's rain doesn't signal an end to the dry season, however, since it won't really end until May when the regular rains should start.

Sam5
2005-Apr-01, 01:15 AM
¡Buenas tardes, amigo! Bienvenidos. Soy Vivo en Nuevo México. No tenemos mucha lluvia aquí.

Normandy6644
2005-Apr-01, 01:49 AM
It rained yesterday evening here for the first time since last October. Not too much, 1.5cm, but anything is better than nothing. It was very welcome because we've been having very hot weather that has, added to the dry conditions (and with the help of some very ignorant and/or bad people), resulted in a spate of forest fires in the mountains. Last week I thought I'd get called up to go fight one that was approaching our town, but it was brought under control before they had to call in more folks. Whew! Yesterday's rain doesn't signal an end to the dry season, however, since it won't really end until May when the regular rains should start.

What is the rain season generally like in Mexico? I've never been though, but I would imagine (as you said) it can get pretty dry.

astronomo flaquito
2005-Apr-01, 01:51 AM
Hola Sam5,

Nuevo México y Oaxaca se parecen mucho. Montañas, desierto, indígenas y sitios arqueológicos para mencionar algunas cosas que tienen en común. Pero Oaxaca también tiene sus selvas tropicales y, por supuesto, su costa pacífica. Yo vivo en los Valles Centrales que, por su altura, tienen un clima menos caliente (normalmente). Aquí podemos cultivar frutas y verduras todo el año, cocos al lado de duraznos!

I wrote in Spanish because it appeared that you would like to practice yours, but perhaps it would be better to finish up in English, so I will do so.

Anyway, the rain we got yesterday was refreshing and even exciting, complete with lightning and thunder. Nothing like the storms of my youth back in Oklahoma, but welcome just the same. Here they know nothing of tornados, but earthquakes are a regular thing. Speaking of Oklahoma, the lack of distant horizons here is something I miss a great deal (hemmed in by mountains), and does make some astronomical viewing difficult, if not impossible, but there are tradeoffs wherever one lives.

Normandy6644
2005-Apr-01, 01:54 AM
Yo vivo en los Valles Centrales que, por su altura, tienen un clima menos caliente (normalmente). Aquí podemos cultivar frutas y verduras todo el año, cocos al lado de duraznos!



So it doesn't sound all bad. :wink:

(Dónde has aprendido ingés? Lo hablas muy bien. Pues, lo escribes de todos modos :D )

Sam5
2005-Apr-01, 02:12 AM
Coconuts next to peach trees! It’s too cold here in the winter for coconuts, but we do have peach trees. Then in the summer it is very hot and dry, especially in the southern part of the state. I have some Zapotec rugs hanging on my walls. They are made very much like the way the Navajos make rugs.

I was hemmed in by mountains when I lived in West Virginia. I didn’t like that much.

I’ve been looking at Oaxaca pictures here.... http://www.tomzap.com/hwy175.html

So how are the night skies and stargazing down there?

W.F. Tomba
2005-Apr-01, 02:17 AM
(Dónde has aprendido ingés? Lo hablas muy bien. Pues, lo escribes de todos modos :D )

Anyway, the rain we got yesterday was refreshing and even exciting, complete with lightning and thunder. Nothing like the storms of my youth back in Oklahoma, but welcome just the same. Here they know nothing of tornados, but earthquakes are a regular thing. Speaking of Oklahoma, the lack of distant horizons here is something I miss a great deal (hemmed in by mountains), and does make some astronomical viewing difficult, if not impossible, but there are tradeoffs wherever one lives.
Yeah, his English ain't bad for an Okie. :P

dvb
2005-Apr-01, 02:58 AM
Rained here for the first time this year just lastnight. No thunderstorms yet though. :cry:

Normandy6644
2005-Apr-01, 03:11 AM
(Dónde has aprendido ingés? Lo hablas muy bien. Pues, lo escribes de todos modos :D )

Anyway, the rain we got yesterday was refreshing and even exciting, complete with lightning and thunder. Nothing like the storms of my youth back in Oklahoma, but welcome just the same. Here they know nothing of tornados, but earthquakes are a regular thing. Speaking of Oklahoma, the lack of distant horizons here is something I miss a great deal (hemmed in by mountains), and does make some astronomical viewing difficult, if not impossible, but there are tradeoffs wherever one lives.
Yeah, his English ain't bad for an Okie. :P

Note to self: Read posts before asking questions. #-o

mopc
2005-Apr-01, 05:18 PM
We've been having a bit of a drought here in Southern Brazil too. Pretty awful for the agriculture.

astronomo flaquito
2005-Apr-01, 10:32 PM
Our rainy season usually starts in May, though it may start as early as April or as late as June. It lasts until October although it may continue to rain until mid November. The rainiest months are June and September. The beauty of our rainy season is that it doesn't rain all day. The days almost always start off clear and sunny, then by mid day it begins to cloud up and by mid afternoon it starts to rain and usually continues well into the night. It doesn't usually rain every day during the season, but it may rain everyday for several weeks at a time. The rain helps keep the temerature moderate. Our hottest time of the year is Spring, March, April, and May, with April being the absolute hottest, but generally no more than about 95°F. At that time of the year, being at the end of the dry season, the humidity is so low that just getting out of the sun is enough to stay comfortable. The intensity of the sun at this elevation is tremendous, one burns quite easily. Our dry season is very dry. Usually no rain at all from October to May, but sometimes we may get showers like we had the other evening, or a drizzly day or two (usually in Deember if it happens). As for year-round fruit and vegetable cultivation, it is only possible with irrigation. Fortunately, our town has a system of irrigation canals which we can tap (and I do). We aren't suffering a drought per se, as the dry season is a yearly affair, but it is said that we get less rainfall now than was common as recently as twenty years ago.

Yes, English is my mother tongue, and Spanish an adopted language for me. I have no problem with being consdered an Okie, I'm rather proud of my family and heritage. My wife is Zapotec and her family refers to me as an Oklateco (Oklahoman/Zapotec), which flatters me since it demonstrates how much they consider me to be a member of the family.

The night viewing is generally great in the dry season, as you might imagine, but generally horrid in the rainy season. Of course, as I mentioned, the lack of distant horizons makes some observations difficult, and there is a great deal of light pollution from the city. Fortunately, our town is on the other side of some mountains from the city so it isn't too bad for me at home.

Meteora
2005-Apr-03, 03:23 PM
Yeah, his English ain't bad for an Okie. :P

Yeah, but he ain't said nothin' about no toad stranglers yet, an' he's a talkin' 'bout rain.

Okay, I'm a native of Illinois, and don't really speak Okie myself. :lol:

Frantic Freddie
2005-Apr-03, 04:58 PM
Hola Sam5,

Nuevo México y Oaxaca se parecen mucho. Montañas, desierto, indígenas y sitios arqueológicos para mencionar algunas cosas que tienen en común. .

[delurk mode]Perdoname amigo,but New Mexico,while having the things you mentioned,is quite a bit different from Oaxaca.Almost 1000 miles from any ocean,most of the state is characterized as "high desert",with most of the trees (pinon,juniper & Ponderosa pine dominating) are on the slopes of the central mountain chains.The state is way too arid to support any kind of citrus fruit or avocados,which of course do grow in Oaxaca.
However,New Mexico does supply 80% of the nation's chiles,a hot,dry climate being the ideal for that crop.
We've had a very wet winter (for us) but even in a good year we couldn't begin to come close to Oaxaca in annual precipitation.
[/delurk mode]

astronomo flaquito
2005-Apr-04, 03:54 PM
Frantic Freddie,

I could've said that Oaxaca and Oklahoma are similar, and they are. But of course there are also many, many differences. Likewise between Oaxaca and New Mexico. I was only trying to establish a connection between New Mexico, where Sam5 lives, and Oaxaca, where I live as a means to establish a more personal connection between us. I certainly had no intention of offending you by mentioning the few similarities which I did state, and I also mentioned some differences, so it is clear that I am not foolishly thinking that they are alike in every way.

The annual rainfall for both Oaxaca and New Mexico varies according to the micro climate of the region. In some areas of Oaxaca I'm confident there is as little rain as in New Mexico, and likewise I imagine, though I may be wrong here, that there are some areas of New Mexico that receive considerably more rainfall than the state average.

Oaxaca has many different regions, speaking culturally, geographically, and climatically and a profound variety of fruits and vegetables are produced here, including some varieties of chile that are not produced elsewhere. It is due to the elevation here in the central valleys that we can produce temperate zone and tropical fruits in the same plot. This also applies to vegetables. I mentioned earlier peaches and coconuts growing side by side, well in my garden I've grown peas, cabbage, and other "cool season crops" along side of tomatoes and chiles (and other "hot season" crops) in all months of the year.

New Mexico is a beautiful place, but my experience there is as a passerby, never have I lived there. I do not know all about it's climate or anything else. Heck, I grew up in Oklahoma and though I know a great deal about it, I can't claim to know all about it. Oaxaca even less as I only have been living here for five years.

Meteora,

I worked hard to diminish my Okie accent and choice of vocabulary, at least for consumption outside of Oklahoma, because there are still a number of people who believe that all Oklahomans are ignorant. I can still talk a great "Okie" when called on to do so and I do really enjoy visiting with friends and family and relaxing into the drawl.

Meteora
2005-Apr-09, 04:35 AM
Meteora,

I worked hard to diminish my Okie accent and choice of vocabulary, at least for consumption outside of Oklahoma, because there are still a number of people who believe that all Oklahomans are ignorant. I can still talk a great "Okie" when called on to do so and I do really enjoy visiting with friends and family and relaxing into the drawl.

One of my coworkers grew up in Mississippi (near Memphis TN) and has likewise worked hard to elminate his Mississippi accent. Once in a while it sneaks into his conversation, but most of the time he sounds like he's from somewhere in the Midwest. I think his reason for the change was similar to yours.

Occasionally, I say one-syllable words in two syllables (like "here" as "hee-yer," then say, "I've been in Oklahoma too long." :D

Quiero vivir en Nuevo México y visitar a Oaxaca. (I hope that's correct, I don't have time to look it up.)