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Miker
2002-Jul-19, 07:26 PM
I was reading CNN (http://www.cnn.com/2002/TECH/space/07/19/planet.freeway/index.html)
about the 'new planet freeway'. It's a bit above my head so to get some more info on this and I clicked on "Resources" hoping to see some sort of detailed graph of the solar system and this 'freeway' and all it was was a slightly bigger pic of the fanciful drawing at the top of the page...just thought it was funny ..then again maybe i need to get out more. At any rate, wouldn't this 'freeway' or these 'freeways' always be dynamic and moving around and disappearing as planets/moons moved making it very hard to line the superhighway with 'outpost' as the article describes?....any thoughts appreciated

GrapesOfWrath
2002-Jul-19, 07:43 PM
That would seem to be the case. OTOH, Jupiter, being the most massive planet, would tend to make sure that its Lagrange points might make good "outpost" stops. They're where Jupiter and the Sun's gravitational influence balances with the orbital influence--they're probably on the planetary highway.

Argos
2002-Jul-19, 07:51 PM
Allow me.

I also think that something like that has to be dynamic. I imagine thess highways more like pearl necklaces instead of tubes (or more like crossing a shallow creek jumping from stone to stone). The "pearls" (or the stones) would correspond to the gravity cancelling regions. So the spaceship would have to be headed to these regions. The flight would have to be corrected all the time. Once you passed through one of those regions you'd have to point your spaceship to the other. I think that in this circumstance you wouldn't have an orbital plane. It would be the end of Hohmann Transfer Orbits. Well, I guess.../phpBB/images/smiles/icon_confused.gif

It wouldn't resolve all our problems of space transportation, but it would help enormously. It could give a life extension to our anachronous and feeble chemical rockets.

Pleased to meet you, Miker. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Argos on 2002-07-19 16:00 ]</font>

David Hall
2002-Jul-20, 08:06 AM
We could always hire the Vogons to clear out a few of the obstacles for us. Bypass coming through! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_lol.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_razz.gif

nebularain
2002-Jul-20, 02:16 PM
I saw it coming, and there wasn't a thing I could do about it.

_________________
"All that is gold does not glitter / Not all those who wander are lost..."

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: nebularain on 2002-07-20 10:16 ]</font>

Espritch
2002-Jul-21, 02:28 AM
I saw it coming, and there wasn't a thing I could do about it.

Of course not. Resistance is useless! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Espritch on 2002-07-20 22:28 ]</font>

GammaSector
2007-Sep-26, 12:59 AM
I am a student hoping to do an informative speech on this subject. Does anyone know where any more information can be found on this subject?

01101001
2007-Sep-26, 01:49 AM
Welcome to the BAUT Forum.


I am a student hoping to do an informative speech on this subject. Does anyone know where any more information can be found on this subject?

If we help, are we just doing your homework for you?

The InterPlanetary Superhighway and the Origins Program (http://www.gg.caltech.edu/~mwl/publications/papers/IPSAndOrigins.pdf) (PDF, about 1 megabyte)

Probably the source of the CNN story:
NASA JPL press release for Genesis Mission: Interplanetary Superhighway Makes Space Travel Simpler (http://www.nasa.gov/lb/mission_pages/genesis/media/jpl-release-071702.html)

Searching the Web on "Martin Lo" and navigation, within the NASA site, or in journals, will probably begin to fill you in on Lo's methods.

Note to readers: Topic originated in July 2002.

NEOWatcher
2007-Sep-26, 12:19 PM
Note to readers: Topic originated in July 2002.
It may be old, but I'm having a hard time grasping why it is so noteworthy.

If I understand it correctly, it is similar to the situation that happened with the Apollo-12 S-IVB.
If that booster were left in an orbit such that the its sun's orbit eventually crossed another planet's lagrange point, then it could have hopped from Earths orbit to an orbit around planet 2, and then the same thing can be done for the next, and so on.

01101001
2007-Sep-27, 01:16 AM
It may be old, but I'm having a hard time grasping why it is so noteworthy.

Seems it was noteworthy, at least worthy of a press release for the Genesis project.

Looks to be personally worthy of note for Martin Lo (http://www.gg.caltech.edu/~mwl/personal/personal2.htm):


In 1995 Martin became the Research and Development Software lead for LTool, a high-level interactive, integrated object-orientated mission design programming environment. His work in the area reduced the time for a single Genesis trajectory generation from eight weeks to a few hours.
[...]
From 1996 to 1999, Martin designed the Genesis Discovery Mission. The Genesis solar panel wind sample return trajectory is one of the most unique and difficult to be flown by JPL in recent years and due to the fact that IPS trajectory requires no deterministic maneuvering after launch, it was the first mission designed with dynamical systems methods.

I guess it depends on what your personal threshold of noteworthiness is.

NEOWatcher
2007-Sep-27, 11:54 AM
...I guess it depends on what your personal threshold of noteworthiness is.
One word...Context.

Noteworthy for press release for other people to review, and for stories in science publications.
Not noteworthy for a quick CNN story with no real explaination as in "Oooh Nasa said"

01101001
2007-Sep-27, 12:45 PM
Not noteworthy for a quick CNN story with no real explaination as in "Oooh Nasa said"

That's what press releases are for. They're news stories you don't have to write. You just regurgitate it. It doesn't call for analysis.

It might not have been worthy of broadcast. Depends on what other news was out there that day. It's certainly worthy of posting on CNN's news site.

CNN has a special section for space news. What could be any more appropriate there than NASA press releases?

NEOWatcher
2007-Sep-27, 01:11 PM
That's what press releases are for. They're news stories you don't have to write. You just regurgitate it. It doesn't call for analysis.
In this case it was not regurgitated, but interviewed, quoted, and buzzworded into a confusing article. The press release was a lot easier to read (IMO).
CNN quoted chaos theory, the press release mentioned lagrange points.

It might not have been worthy of broadcast. Depends on what other news was out there that day. It's certainly worthy of posting on CNN's news site.
CNN has a special section for space news. What could be any more appropriate there than NASA press releases?
In theory, I do agree with you here.

I guess my beef is more how the mainstream media treats it rather than the fact that they report it.

If they just left it alone, or tried to explain it in layman's terms rather than trying to get technoquotes from people, then I wouldn't mind.

01101001
2007-Sep-27, 05:39 PM
In this case it was not regurgitated, but interviewed, quoted, and buzzworded into a confusing article.

I didn't contrast and compare. I didn't read CNN. I went to the source.

Sorry for any confusion. I was only addressing your question of noteworthiness, and why CNN reported it. I didn't get that your original complaint was that CNN bungled it. That ball's in CNN's court.

NEOWatcher
2007-Sep-27, 05:56 PM
Sorry for any confusion....
Nope, it was caused by my wording, and my own confusion as to what I was miffed about.

Van Rijn
2007-Sep-27, 08:04 PM
It may be old, but I'm having a hard time grasping why it is so noteworthy.


It allows for some trajectories with lower delta-v, usually at the cost of time. For unmanned missions, that's often useful. For example, it rescued the Hiten (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiten) mission:

Japan wanted to salvage the mission and proposed a plan to get Hiten to leave Earth orbit and achieve lunar orbit. Unfortunately Hiten only had 10% of the required fuel to make it into lunar orbit. It was determined that Hiten could achieve lunar orbit by using a brand new route to the Moon designed by Edward Belbruno. This low energy lunar transfer using Weak Stability Boundary Theory. This, however, would take several months instead of several days.

publiusr
2007-Oct-12, 06:09 PM
Ah the "Way to get the last drop out of puny rockets" theory.

We figured a way to get a Delta II payload to Mercury--but it has to do almost as many laps in the solar system as at the Winston 500. Great.

Noclevername
2007-Oct-12, 06:14 PM
As a means of travel, it's not too practical. Maybe you could place a space habitat in this highway, and fill it with people who like changes of scenery, or want to play tourist for a few years.