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Glom
2005-Apr-20, 09:48 PM
Today, I passed 100 hours flying time. It was also my successful IMC skills test so it's a double celebration.

tmosher
2005-Apr-20, 09:58 PM
Today, I passed 100 hours flying time. It was also my successful IMC skills test so it's a double celebration.

Congratulations on the one-hundred hour mark - I'm still sitting at 200 hours (got my certificate in 1976).

I'm what you call an infrequent flier (considering I don't have an airplane anymore (gave it back to my brother)). But I've got a 182 to ferry from Puerto Rico to the US in about one month.

Waarthog
2005-Apr-21, 07:40 PM
WOOT!

AND your instrument ticket? I'm Impressed.

Candy
2005-Apr-22, 03:47 AM
Today, I passed 100 hours flying time. It was also my successful IMC skills test so it's a double celebration.
Excellent job, Glom. =D>

jfribrg
2005-Apr-22, 01:52 PM
congrats =D>

I suggest we commission Candy to create a special emoticon for the occasion.

Candy
2005-Apr-22, 02:36 PM
Glom's my favorite 'fighting' pilot. http://www.cosgan.de/images/smilie/verschiedene/h035.gif

Glom
2005-Apr-22, 03:23 PM
Cool smiley. I'll be taking a break now for my exams, and then I'll be in a complex aircraft doing the FAR IR. I also realised that since the successful test is counted as pilot in command under supervision, I got to 25 hours as captain.

Candy
2005-Apr-22, 04:07 PM
I got to 25 hours as captain.
I'm very proud of you, Glom. Come here, let me shake your hand. http://www.cosgan.de/images/smilie/liebe/h053.gif

Glom
2005-Apr-22, 04:19 PM
Very well. You may shake my hand. :D

Nicolas
2005-Apr-22, 06:18 PM
Cool smiley. I'll be taking a break now for my exams, and then I'll be in a complex aircraft doing the FAR IR. I also realised that since the successful test is counted as pilot in command under supervision, I got to 25 hours as captain.

FAR? Shouldn't you be doing JAR these days? For my current design, we've been having some problems with FAR/JAR. I thought JAR was only European (but used in other countries), while the US used FAR. Though somebody who should know, said JAR was used everywhere. Can you shed some light on the issue?

It's a nice look to have the complete JAR 25 and -OPS on the shelf by the way 8) ,

tmosher
2005-Apr-22, 07:04 PM
Cool smiley. I'll be taking a break now for my exams, and then I'll be in a complex aircraft doing the FAR IR. I also realised that since the successful test is counted as pilot in command under supervision, I got to 25 hours as captain.

FAR? Shouldn't you be doing JAR these days? For my current design, we've been having some problems with FAR/JAR. I thought JAR was only European (but used in other countries), while the US used FAR. Though somebody who should know, said JAR was used everywhere. Can you shed some light on the issue?

It's a nice look to have the complete JAR 25 and -OPS on the shelf by the way 8) ,

I'm wondering...is Glom doing his flight training in Europe or the United States? JAR is generally ignored in the United States unless the flight training op is JAR TRTO or the aircraft manufacturer is going for European certification.

Tom

Glom
2005-Apr-22, 07:06 PM
75% of the world's airlines use FAR. I'll do the JAR later.

The advantages of doing FAR now is:
The instrument flying will still count for later on just as my IMC training counts towards my FAR IR, so even ignoring the rating itself, it's a step closer towards a JAR IR.
I get experience in all the IR business, including flying in the European airways system so I can get through the JAR IR quicker when the time comes.
75% of the world's airlines use FAR so I have more options with a more diverse set of qualifications.
I get to fly a complex aircraft at good value.
Until I finish uni, I can't do anything big, so this gives me the chance to progress during the next year while still in education.

tmosher
2005-Apr-22, 07:10 PM
75% of the world's airlines use FAR. I'll do the JAR later.

The advantages of doing FAR now is:
The instrument flying will still count for later on just as my IMC training counts towards my FAR IR, so even ignoring the rating itself, it's a step closer towards a JAR IR.
I get experience in all the IR business, including flying in the European airways system so I can get through the JAR IR quicker when the time comes.
75% of the world's airlines use FAR so I have more options with a more diverse set of qualifications.
I get to fly a complex aircraft at good value.
Until I finish uni, I can't do anything big, so this gives me the chance to progress during the next year while still in education.

Smart move. FAR first then JAR.

JAR is a bit more complicated in pilot certification - some of the requirements, to say the least, are different from FAR requirements.

I worked on a JAR TRTO certification project a couple of years ago.

Nicolas
2005-Apr-22, 07:13 PM
But will FAR be replaced by JAR eventually?

That's what I need to know, as I'm designing a craft with a worldwide market, and of course I want it to have full certifications. If I design it according to JAR, am I "covered"? :)

Glom
2005-Apr-22, 07:22 PM
JAR is a bit more complicated in pilot certification - some of the requirements, to say the least, are different from FAR requirements.

The JAR IR is ATPL standard in theory, which personally I wouldn't have a problem with because I either do it now or later, but the FAR IR for PPLs does away with that irrelevant knowledge. For the moment it's good because I can do it more bit by bit. As I said, this is a good idea because it is a bit of progress towards a goal and ultimately will make it more efficient. I can either wait until after uni and do the JAR flat out, or I can do the FAR now, and get a running start at the JAR for when I leave uni.


But will FAR be replaced by JAR eventually?

I doubt it. But there are moves towards harmonisation within ICAO and having just one PPL and one IR etc, but I expect it would be a combination of both.

Nicolas
2005-Apr-22, 07:31 PM
But planes with JAR certification (I'm not talking about pilots) are allowed to fly in FAR countries, right? (I'm thinking of airbuses for example).

Glom
2005-Apr-22, 08:17 PM
Not sure. Don't manufacturers have to get certification from both organisations? I'd be more certain about JAR certified aircraft being allowed in America than FAR certified aircraft being allowed in Europe.

Nicolas
2005-Apr-22, 08:38 PM
That was what I thought as well, as JAR (mainly) copies FAR but is more stringent on some fronts.

For those interested, I'm currently in a design team developing a concept for what is called an "aerostructures transportation aircraft".

For those staring blank, can you say "Beluga"?
For those still staring blank, can you click links (http://thestar.com.my/archives/2005/1/16/nation/plane.jpg)?

Only the plane we're designing will have to carry parts up to Fokker 50 main subassembly size (like a16m fuselage). Options are modifying an existing plane, or designing a completely new craft.
It will have to fly 9000 km at 60% payload, and lift off at 1500m runways-both of which are rather stringent requirements on such a plane. Probably we'll have to change the runway requirement, or else we'll have to resort to rocket assisted takeoff or such things :) :P :roll: .

Glom
2005-Apr-22, 09:01 PM
I thought Fokker went bust.

tmosher
2005-Apr-23, 01:51 AM
But planes with JAR certification (I'm not talking about pilots) are allowed to fly in FAR countries, right? (I'm thinking of airbuses for example).

Airbus aircraft have FAA certification under Parts 21 and 25. Essentially, the FAA has accepted the data provided by Airbus and have certified those aircraft.

There is a harmonization (that's what the FAA calls it) between FAR Part 25 and JAR Part 25. Essentially, this allows an aircraft certified by the JAA to be certified by the FAA and vice versa.

As long as the aircraft certified by the JAA meets the requirements of the corresponding FARs, the aircraft can be certified in the US. Before the JAA was formed, bilateral agreements existed between the United States and various countries that covered the importation and exportation of aircraft. These bilateral agreements are still in effect.

I'll do a little more digging, there's a couple of FAA websites that deal with this.

If you want to read some of the regulatory data, this (http://www.airweb.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance_Library/rgAdvisoryCircular.nsf/0/6410211f7772a92a86256f5100517d5a/$FILE/AC21-23B.pdf) might be helpful.

Nicolas
2005-Apr-23, 01:02 PM
I thought Fokker went bust.

The AC building part of Fokker went bust indeed.
All recent Fokker types are still used and maintained.
Also, the size requirement was just that: an indication of parts size.

Our design is a university concept generation project, not on demand of Fokker.

From what I had heard, the FAR and JAR regulations were (mainly) interexchangeable indeed.