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Glom
2005-Apr-22, 03:43 PM
What languages does everyone speak?

English is obviously my native language. I have done a bit of French, but I stopped studying it at GCSE so I'm a bit out of practice. I know a tiny bit of Hebrew, but not much worthwhile. I did Japanese a bit last year, which was fun. I also did Latin at AS level, although I'm a bit rusty with it.

jfribrg
2005-Apr-22, 04:01 PM
I learned German in high school (or should I say that I learned German in Gymnasium :) ).

I also took 12 college credits in American Sign Language (yes it really is a separate language with its own grammar, idioms , culture, etc.)

Gullible Jones
2005-Apr-22, 04:07 PM
English is my primary language. I'm taking a Latin class in school, so I know some Latin... And, coming from a Jewish family (and being forced to attend Hebrew school for a couple of years), I used to know some Hebrew. I've pretty much forgotten all of that now, though.

azazul
2005-Apr-22, 04:10 PM
My primary language is C++, but I also know quite a bit in Python, Java, IBM370, PHP, and a few others.

pumpkinpie
2005-Apr-22, 04:12 PM
I learned German in high school (or should I say that I learned German in Gymnasium :) ).

I also took 12 college credits in American Sign Language (yes it really is a separate language with its own grammar, idioms , culture, etc.)

Same three for me! Primary English. I took 4-1/2 years of German spread over high school and college. I also took three ASL courses at our local Hearing and Speech Agency. Unfortunately, I'm not fluent in either, but I know enough to stumble through.

papageno
2005-Apr-22, 04:17 PM
Italian: mother tongue
German: former native
English: fluent-ish
French: beginner (never really practiced speaking)
Latin: five years in high school
Ancient Greek: again high school
Modern Greek: less than beginner (I won't starve if I am in Greece)
Japanese: a few words picked up from animes (I will starve if I am in Japan)

SeanF
2005-Apr-22, 04:17 PM
English is my primary language. I did take Spanish in high school and a little bit in college, but I never used it so yo no recuerdo mucho.

TriangleMan
2005-Apr-22, 04:26 PM
Here's a ~two-year old thread (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=8239) on languages that BABB posters knew.

Parrothead
2005-Apr-22, 04:33 PM
English, Estonian and extremely broken French (haven't used it in years).

edit for typo

Candy
2005-Apr-22, 04:36 PM
I also took 12 college credits in American Sign Language (yes it really is a separate language with its own grammar, idioms , culture, etc.)
I know you specified American Sign Language, so this may be a really dumb question, but is Sign Language the same in every language? 8-[

PeterFab
2005-Apr-22, 04:37 PM
Danish is my primary language. So I also understand Swedish and Norwegian enough to talk to people from those countries.
I also speak English and German, had 3 years of Russian in school, but no longer remembers enough to speak that. And I had Latin for a year.

Humphrey
2005-Apr-22, 04:42 PM
Gtopian.


and a bit of English.

Candy
2005-Apr-22, 04:47 PM
I've studied Spanish, Japanese, and German.

More Spanish than the others. I was amazed at the first time I actually spoke a sentence without thinking. I'm way out of touch, now. :oops:

I can understand bits and pieces of Arabic (only when spoken). I can't read it.

Has anyone else ever noticed that the Japanese use the Spanish a-e-i-o-u when pronouncing their words. 8-[

Russ
2005-Apr-22, 05:10 PM
Birth language: Texan
Current: American
Passible: English
Get my face slapped: German, Spanish, French

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Apr-22, 06:19 PM
English and a bit of French (it got me through France, so it can't be that bad...)

jfribrg
2005-Apr-22, 06:42 PM
I also took 12 college credits in American Sign Language (yes it really is a separate language with its own grammar, idioms , culture, etc.)
I know you specified American Sign Language, so this may be a really dumb question, but is Sign Language the same in every language? 8-[

There are many similar signs in all the languages, especially for common nouns ( a common example is the sign for telephone) , but there are many different sign languages. I'm not familiar with the others, but I do know that American and English sign languages do not even use the same handshapes for the letters of the alphabet.

Normandy6644
2005-Apr-22, 07:26 PM
English: Native

Italian: Getting much better, will be fluent by the end of the summer (going to Italy with girlfriend and her family, where she is from)

Spanish: pretty fluent, though I forget a word here and there, but can normally work around it.

German: Learned the grammar well, speak okay, but severely lacking in vocabulary (in my own opinion)

French: only a little


Italian: mother tongue

I didn't know that! Where are you from?

V-GER
2005-Apr-22, 07:47 PM
Besides Finnish; English, Swedish, a bit of German and I'm now studying
Italian in evening school.

mopc
2005-Apr-22, 08:31 PM
Portuguese of course is my mother language. Early in my life I started learning Italian and English, and now I speak English almost as fluently as a native. At 14 I started learning German, which I came to master quite well too, besides a good Swedish later complemented by a knowledge of Dutch, never forgetting to get in touch with the Romance languages, of which after Italian I speak Catalan the best. Romanian, Spanish, Latin and French I can understand, i've taken a look at them

Of the Slavic languages I have studied Polish and Russian, which I speak at a mediocre level even though I used all of their grammar gadgets like the declensions.

Outside Europe I know Chinese better, I can have a conversation and I know more than 500 characters already, it's the language I am studying now and the one I intend to become fluent in just like English and German, thus it will be my third choice as a foreign language to be learned all the way. I'm learning at least 10 characters every day and I'm teaching Chinese at elementary level.

I've studied some Arabic, but I've only mastered the alphabet and the grammar structure, little vocbulary. Another alphabet I have learned, which is my favorite, is the Nagari or Devanagari script of India.

I've also studied Persian but not too much.

I have hundreds of books about virtually every language you've ever heard of, and I am attempting to answer the questions: what is there in common between all human languages? Why are languages the way they are??

Swift
2005-Apr-22, 08:37 PM
English is my native tongue, some might even say I'm fluent. :wink:

I've not learned three other languages: Spanish in high school, German in college, French in France. After 10 months in France, including 2 months of night classes, I could barely get by. Most of that has leaked out my mind in the 18 years since. I guess I got all the chemistry genes and my sister got all the language genes (English major with a minor in French and Italian).

I do feel bad when i visit other countries and have to depend on their abilities in English (rather than my ability in their language), but I'm close to hopeless. :(

iFire
2005-Apr-22, 09:13 PM
I can speak American! I have learned a tiny bit of French over the past two years at school.

Charlie in Dayton
2005-Apr-23, 05:15 AM
To paraphrase Russ:
Birth language: South Buckeye
Current: Amurrican
Passable: English
Workplace dialects: Windows XP, Lotus Notes, MS Office, Novell
Not a clue: wimmen-speak

papageno
2005-Apr-23, 11:45 AM
Italian: mother tongue
I didn't know that! Where are you from?
North-East of Italy (Veneto).
This (http://www.vinigo.com/index.htm) is my village.

And in this picture
http://www.vinigo.com/images/via_savilla.jpg
you can see my house (right next to the church, on the right).

dvb
2005-Apr-23, 11:58 AM
Wow, that's a beautiful landscape. :D

Canadian English is my primary.

Learned Canadian French in kindergarten, but haven't used it since. Like they say, if you don't use it, you lose it.

papageno
2005-Apr-23, 12:10 PM
I have hundreds of books about virtually every language you've ever heard of...
Anything about Ladin?
(It's the "dialect" from where I am from -- well, it is considered a language rather than a dialect.)

Grendl
2005-Apr-23, 12:10 PM
I learned German in high school (or should I say that I learned German in Gymnasium :) ).

I also took 12 college credits in American Sign Language (yes it really is a separate language with its own grammar, idioms , culture, etc.)
I know the sign language alphabet fluently. :D When we were kids there was this deaf kid on Squirrel Island in Boothbay, so we learned when I was eight. I don't know a lot of the sign terms or images, though, just the alphabet and words. My ex-neighbor and best pal here interprets for a living. A cool side benefit: he gets front-row tickets to all the best concerts, since deaf people have special front-stage access. He'll get a call from the concert producer, say, because some deaf people want to see Cher, and off he goes. I think it's a great job. He transcribes for university classes (the lectures), too.

Here's a nifty little quiz regarding the ASL alphabet: ASL Quiz (http://www.lessontutor.com/jmASLword.html)

PhantomWolf
2005-Apr-23, 12:12 PM
well I have a splattering or French and Maori though not really enough of either to do little more than say hello and introduce myself along with a couple of other phrases and ideas.

I am pretty good at BASIC, Pascal, Modula-2, ADA, C, C++, VB6, VBA, VB .Net, VBScript, JavaScript, HTML, XML, MU*Code and am passable in LISP.

I'm trying to learn American too, but that is even weirder than Australian.

Grendl
2005-Apr-23, 01:13 PM
Italian: mother tongue
I didn't know that! Where are you from?
North-East of Italy (Veneto).

Your village is gorgeous! I never had the time to explore the mountains when I went to Venice years ago, (my mother lived in Venice before permanently settling in Rome), but I did have a "perfect moment"* in Siena, in Tuscany. I just love the Italian villages nestled within the mountains. The thing is, I can never understand why people would leave those places, except for job prospects, I suppose. If I had mountains to look at like that every morning, I would never leave. I guess when one is younger, they need or desire more city-life excitement and stimulation--I can see how a youth might be bored in a small town like that--I know I was when a teenager. Now I'm just old and decrepit. 8-[

Thanks for sharing the pictures and site. Maybe people will be inclined to put it on their itinerary now. I didn't know there was an Italian on the board- :oops: -hope you didn't see my comments on the Romans stealing the Greeks' gods. :o But they did....

*reference to Spalding Gray's "Swimming to Cambodia"
Edit: Sienna to Siena-oops.

papageno
2005-Apr-23, 01:30 PM
Italian: mother tongue
I didn't know that! Where are you from?
North-East of Italy (Veneto).

Your village is gorgeous! I never had the time to explore the mountains when I went to Venice years ago, (my mother lived in Venice before permanently settling in Rome), but I did have a "perfect moment"* in Sienna, in Tuscany.
Well, it takes three hours of train travel from Venice (just to get to the end station).



I just love the Italian villages nestled within the mountains. The thing is, I can never understand why people would leave those places, except for job prospects, I suppose.
That is the problem.
The best chance of a job would be in tourism.
But then, I'd rather move to Santorini.



If I had mountains to look at like that every morning, I would never leave. I guess when one is younger, they need or desire more city-life excitement and stimulation--I can see how a youth might be bored in a small town like that--I know I was when a teenager. Now I'm just old and decrepit. 8-[
It is a very small village (150 inhabitants) and not directly connected by public transport.
There is just a little shop (*cough* guess who's the owner *cough*) and a sort of pub.
Personally, I prefer living in a city (I lived in Berlin for a while, and I loved it).



Thanks for sharing the pictures and site. Maybe people will be inclined to put it on their itinerary now. I didn't know there was an Italian on the board- :oops: -hope you didn't see my comments on the Romans stealing the Greeks' gods. :o But they did....
Well, the Romans stole the intellectuals from Greece, not to mention most of the tragedies and comedies (my high school was a liceo classico: we did plenty of Greek and Latin literature).

Normandy6644
2005-Apr-23, 03:32 PM
That's so cool papageno. I'm going to Fondi this summer, but I'll probably travel all around too.

ngc3314
2005-Apr-23, 06:57 PM
What languages does everyone speak?


Lessee - English (or as they say in some spots, Amerikaans) natively, with a touch of Deep South accent when I'm tired or fed up with things. (This means I can understand practically everything that Jeff Foxworthy and his fellow performers say - does that count as another language?) Dutch comes next for comprehension, although that "de/het" distinction slips right past my memory for nouns. My Russian grammar is probably better, but vocabulary is heavily weighted toward astronomy and cosmonautics. (This was good enough to get me not only into, but out of, trouble when I was detained by those guards in Soviet Armenia right before a meeting). My German isn't too bad - more formal study than Dutch but lots less practice. Finishing the list with "survival Spanish", a level which is only slightly embarrassing after all that time in Tucson, and meeting my wife while she was teaching a bilingual kindergarten class on the border.

Hmm. Another embarrassing admission would be that I've been using FORTRAN for 33 years now, having picked it up when our new high school shared an IBM 1130 with a local business. I can at least read C

mopc
2005-Apr-25, 03:54 AM
People into hard sciences should really take a good look into linguistics. It's almost a hard sciece, like biology. It's really cool.

Let's see who knows linguistics here: what's an ergative language?

Glom
2005-Apr-25, 11:27 AM
I know what subjunctive is. Does that count?

AstroSmurf
2005-Apr-25, 11:50 AM
Mother tongue: Swedish
Fluent: English (I use it daily as our corporate language, plus lots of other uses)
Passable: German and French - I know enough to read some fiction, and could probably get by in those languages, but will probably need to lug a dictionary and/or take extra classes if I was to live someplace where I'd have to use it daily.
Know enough to get in trouble: Japanese (learning more atm).
Can puzzle together sentences with a bit of time and material: Latin, Quenya

Meteora
2005-Apr-25, 04:03 PM
I just bought almost a dozen books on several languages this weekend. :o

Currently, I'm fluent in:

American English

Passable:

Okie :) (for those of you not familiar with the term, it refers to the speech of residents of Oklahoma, USA)

Almost passable:

Spanish (emphasis on Mexican dialect)

Can read with partial comprehension:

French, Portuguese

Can read with a lot of help from a dictionary:

Chinese, German

Minimal vocabulary, but significant interest:

Japanese, Arabic, Russian

Computer languages:

COBOL, BASIC, Pascal, FORTRAN, C, C++, JavaScript, Java 2, Perl, Tcl/Tk, Python, PHP - with varying degrees of proficiency (I'm most familiar with C, Python, and PHP).

Melusine
2005-May-12, 12:23 AM
Italian: mother tongue
German: former native
English: fluent-ish
French: beginner (never really practiced speaking)
Latin: five years in high school
Ancient Greek: again high school
Modern Greek: less than beginner (I won't starve if I am in Greece)
Japanese: a few words picked up from animes (I will starve if I am in Japan)
Papageno, can you please translate what seems should be something simple? BabelFish won't translate every word:

Lo Sappiamo E Veramente Dura...essere straordinari come te! Auguri!

BabelFish translates it as:

Sappiamo and Hard Veramente... to be extraordinary as you! Auguries! or if I remove the 'lo' it says:
We know and Truly Hard... to be extraordinary as you! Auguries!

Huh? There's a picture of Sylvester the Cat and Tweetie Bird is holding the Earth, then inside they throw it like a basketball. Seems corny, does it not? I can't find what 'auguri' is.


Mopc:
People into hard sciences should really take a good look into linguistics. It's almost a hard sciece, like biology. It's really cool.

Let's see who knows linguistics here: what's an ergative language?
I looked up 'ergative language', so I can't say I can really explain it well. But you're right--it really is a science, a social science, but not too different than archeologists digging up bones and trying to put 2 and 2 together.


ergative-absolutive language (http://www.answers.com/topic/ergative-absolutive-language)

The only ergative-absolutive language in Europe is the language isolate Basque. Note the following examples:

Gizona etorri da. "The man has arrived."
Gizonak mutila ikusi du. "The man saw the boy."

~

Other languages that employ an ergative-absolutive system are:

Dyirbal and several other Australian Aboriginal languages, which are famous in the linguistic literature for their ergative patterns
Pashto and Hindi, which belong to the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European languages
Sāmoan and many other Austronesian languages
Virtually all Caucasian languages (Abkhaz, Chechen, etc.)
The various Inuit dialects (Inuktitut, Inupik, Yupik)
Many languages of the Americas, such as Maya and Navajo

Normandy6644
2005-May-12, 02:07 AM
Italian: mother tongue
German: former native
English: fluent-ish
French: beginner (never really practiced speaking)
Latin: five years in high school
Ancient Greek: again high school
Modern Greek: less than beginner (I won't starve if I am in Greece)
Japanese: a few words picked up from animes (I will starve if I am in Japan)
Papageno, can you please translate what seems should be something simple? BabelFish won't translate every word:

Lo Sappiamo E Veramente Dura...essere straordinari come te! Auguri!

BabelFish translates it as:

Sappiamo and Hard Veramente... to be extraordinary as you! Auguries! or if I remove the 'lo' it says:
We know and Truly Hard... to be extraordinary as you! Auguries!

Huh? There's a picture of Sylvester the Cat and Tweetie Bird is holding the Earth, then inside they throw it like a basketball. Seems corny, does it not? I can't find what 'auguri' is.


I'll take a quick stab at it.

"Lo sappiamo e veramente dura...essere straodinari come te. Auguri!"

We know it and it truly lasts...to be extraodinary (plural?) like you. Congratulations!

Now, the "auguri" doesn't literally mean congratulations, it literally means wishes. But it's used as such, like "Tanti Auguri" means Happy Birthday, or just "many wishes". I'm not sure why the extraordinary part is plural, because it should be "straordinario." I also can't figure out what the sentence actually means beyond just a simple translation. Maybe papageno will know better than I.

Eta C
2005-May-12, 01:45 PM
Original language: English

Fluent: Modern Greek

Passable: Spanish

Smattering: Italian, French

Then there's the obscure language I had to learn for my job: Navalese. I'm not talking about the usual stuff, deck for floor, bulkhead for wall, head for restroom, etc. No, this is the language of administration. A small example (I'm not shouting here. Navalese is only written in capital letters).

BZ FOR OPERATIONS ICW JTFEX 08-3. DIRLAUTH COMCRUDESGRU SIX ONE FOR TRANSIT YOKO. REPORT PIM TO CDS ONE N3. COMDESRON ONE SENDS.

BT

Melusine
2005-May-12, 04:19 PM
[quote=papageno]Italian: mother tongue
Papageno, can you please translate what seems should be something simple? BabelFish won't translate every word:

Lo Sappiamo E Veramente Dura...essere straordinari come te! Auguri!

BabelFish translates it as:

Sappiamo and Hard Veramente... to be extraordinary as you! Auguries! or if I remove the 'lo' it says:
We know and Truly Hard... to be extraordinary as you! Auguries!

Huh? There's a picture of Sylvester the Cat and Tweetie Bird is holding the Earth, then inside they throw it like a basketball. Seems corny, does it not? I can't find what 'auguri' is.


I'll take a quick stab at it.

"Lo sappiamo e veramente dura...essere straodinari come te. Auguri!"

We know it and it truly lasts...to be extraodinary (plural?) like you. Congratulations!

Now, the "auguri" doesn't literally mean congratulations, it literally means wishes. But it's used as such, like "Tanti Auguri" means Happy Birthday, or just "many wishes". I'm not sure why the extraordinary part is plural, because it should be "straordinario." I also can't figure out what the sentence actually means beyond just a simple translation. Maybe papageno will know better than I.
Thank you, that makes some sense, though I think with the combination of the pictures (it's a card) the translation makes it sound odd, but then considering the source...Auguri =wishes would be right, then. Why doesn't BabelFish have that word? Seems simple enough. Must get an Italian dictonary. Would straordoinari be plural because it's two people talking (actually, a cat and a bird) to the card recipient? The card is from two people.
:)

Normandy6644
2005-May-12, 07:44 PM
[quote=papageno]Italian: mother tongue
Papageno, can you please translate what seems should be something simple? BabelFish won't translate every word:

Lo Sappiamo E Veramente Dura...essere straordinari come te! Auguri!

BabelFish translates it as:

Sappiamo and Hard Veramente... to be extraordinary as you! Auguries! or if I remove the 'lo' it says:
We know and Truly Hard... to be extraordinary as you! Auguries!

Huh? There's a picture of Sylvester the Cat and Tweetie Bird is holding the Earth, then inside they throw it like a basketball. Seems corny, does it not? I can't find what 'auguri' is.


I'll take a quick stab at it.

"Lo sappiamo e veramente dura...essere straodinari come te. Auguri!"

We know it and it truly lasts...to be extraodinary (plural?) like you. Congratulations!

Now, the "auguri" doesn't literally mean congratulations, it literally means wishes. But it's used as such, like "Tanti Auguri" means Happy Birthday, or just "many wishes". I'm not sure why the extraordinary part is plural, because it should be "straordinario." I also can't figure out what the sentence actually means beyond just a simple translation. Maybe papageno will know better than I.
Thank you, that makes some sense, though I think with the combination of the pictures (it's a card) the translation makes it sound odd, but then considering the source...Auguri =wishes would be right, then. Why doesn't BabelFish have that word? Seems simple enough. Must get an Italian dictonary. Would straordoinari be plural because it's two people talking (actually, a cat and a bird) to the card recipient? The card is from two people.
:)

If it's two people then it shoudn't say "come te" which is "as you," but rather "come voi" which is plural.

HenrikOlsen
2005-Sep-16, 12:42 PM
Native Danish, so I can also communicate with Swedish and Norwegian people.
Idiomatic English
Enough German to understand what people are saying, but no practice in speaking.
Enough French to figure out what a text is about, but not enough to know what it's saying.
Enough Spanish to not starve.
Enough of the other european languages to recognise spammail when I see it in that language.

FP
2005-Sep-16, 02:32 PM
Native Southern US English speaker (it's y'all, not ya'll)

Three years of German, two years of French in High school and college

Fluent in Medical

Passable obstetrical Spanish (Dolor? pointing to abdomen)

Lianachan
2005-Sep-16, 02:41 PM
English (or Scots, as I prefer) is my native language, although I enjoy deploying Highland English to confuse people (English, but with a Gaelic gramatical structure). I also speak enough Gaelic and French to get me by, with a dusting of phrases of spoken German and Spanish (which I can read a tad better). Does Quenyan count? I know that reasonably well too.

Incidently, when I was very young I lived in Spain - and I spoke Spanish with very little English. It's now all forgotten, although I'd like to think it's all filed away somewhere in my head in case I need it again.

mopc
2005-Sep-16, 03:52 PM
Anything about Ladin?
(It's the "dialect" from where I am from -- well, it is considered a language rather than a dialect.)

I have books with description of the language, also called Romanche of which Friulano maybe considered either a dialect or the closest relative. Itīs characterized by the palatalization of initial stops like French or Piemontese. Iīve read the lenguage in the Swiss government website, itīs not that hard.

mopc
2005-Sep-16, 04:18 PM
I looked up 'ergative language', so I can't say I can really explain it well.

Your examples are correct, yes, Basque and those others are ergative. Ergativity is a feature of overt case marking languages in which the subject of a transitive verb is marked differently from the subject of an intransitive verb, which tends to be marked like the object of a transitive verb.


But you're right--it really is a science, a social science, but not too different than archeologists digging up bones and trying to put 2 and 2 together.

Itīs not a social science. Itīs a science akin to chemistry and biology in terms of rigidity. It does have its social side, but thatīs more like communication. Linguists study the mathematical and structural properties of human languages. Ergativity above is a good example. Itīs funny how itīs found across so many different language groups: Basque, Pashto, Georgian, Aboriginal Languages, and even Amazonian languages like Yanomamo (one of the most primitive tribes of the world).

One of the commonest myths about language is that primitive man, before the invention of writing, only has simple language, with virtually no grammar, nad that the grammar we study in our modern languages in school was actually invented by civilized man.

The truth is that grammar arises unconsciously in all human groups, and all languages possess a roughly similar level of structural complexity.

But if languages are like chemicals or organisms, can you describe a language in a "formula" like a chemical compound? Yes you can, even though modern Science hasnīt fully comprehended the structure of language, of any language.

For instance, English can be described:

diachronically/genetically: it belongs to the Western branch of the Germany group of the Indo-European language family (which comprises most languages of India, Iran and Europe). Itīs closest relatives are Frisian, Dutch, Yiddish and German, then Danish, Norwegian Bokmaal, Swedish and Icelandic.

Darwin had already noticed the parallel between language evolution and biological evolution.

Structurally:

syntactical alignment: nominative (as opposed to ergative)
main constituents order: Subject-Verb-Object (SVO)
head parameter: head-initial
adpositions: prepositions (as opposed to postpositions)
relative clause: by relative pronoun, follows the antecedent
adjective: precedes noun
articles: yes, precede adjective+noun phrase, definite and indefinite.
morphology: mild inflexion, little or no agreement, head-final noun compounding.
case: marked only in personal pronouns and optionally on the word "who", with a nominative vs. non-nomimative opposition system

Halcyon Dayz
2005-Sep-16, 05:19 PM
I speak Low Saxon, Dutch, German and English.
All fluently I like to think.

Gillianren
2005-Sep-16, 07:23 PM
I am, obviously, pretty darn fluent in English. I also speak passable Valley Girl, though I grew up in the next valley over, and I'm learning Washingtonian, which is mainly talking about coffee, rain, and computers a lot.

I spoke pretty good Spanish in high school--I took three years--but a) I haven't used it in years, and b) my accent's a little odd. see, I took Spanish from a Swedish guy who'd lived in Argentina, Spain, France, and America as well as Sweden. in addition, there were all the Mexican kids in my class, as well as at least a Venezuelan as well. (they were trying for the easy A, except my best friend, who was trying for better spelling/grammar.) so I have this weird Castllian/Argentinian/Mexican/Venezuelan/American accent thing going, but I can still make myself understood to waiters. (and, in fact, asked one of them a grammatical question the last time we went to our local Mexican restaurant that he didn't have an answer to, either.)

I took a quarter of Irish Gaelic Language and Song in college, which means I can greet people and sing about happy little boats floating on the bay--and booze. a little bit about death, too.

I can fingerspell in Amslan, and I have a friend who took a couple of quarters and fingerspells everything as she talks, unless she actually knows the sign, in which case she uses that instead. I can say "quantum leap," too, because of the episode with the deaf dancer.

I know enough Italian to be a pretty good classical musician, and I know a few food terms, but past that, I'm lost. I also know bits in French, Japanese, Chinese (thank you, Big Bird Goes to China, Greek, Latin, and Old Norse. a word or two in Russian. maybe a few others that I'm forgetting. and I have a list of very funny phrases in Aramaic that I'm probably pronouncing wrong.

TriangleMan
2005-Sep-16, 08:02 PM
Looks like that old thread I linked to on page 1 got deleted back when BA trimmed the BABBling forum. So to reiterate:

Fluent: English (non-eh Canadian dialect ;) )

Some: French (high-school & college, I wouldn't be able to read a newspaper but I wouldn't starve either)

Bit: Arabic (but slowly learning)

Arneb
2005-Sep-16, 08:19 PM
German - mother tongue
English - well, I'm practicing
Spanish - passable, rusty of late.
Italian - No-starve level.
French - Same
Latin - Long school career (8.5 years) up to "Abitur" level; bits of it kept alive by my profession and singing in choirs.
Ancient Greek - Was my special at gymnasium, but gee, one does forget these things. :sad:

Monique
2005-Sep-16, 09:12 PM
French
Spanish

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