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sparticus1701
2005-Apr-25, 05:07 PM
Friday night I got my Celestron Nexstar 11 GPS going really for the first time and saw Jupiter with the 4 visible moons, and Saturn rings and all. I was so excited!

I'm looking to expand my accessories, and I found an electronic eyepiece:

http://www.telescope.com/jump.jsp?itemType=PRODUCT&itemID=6517

I also found one by Acuter.

I'd really like something in this area, but I don't want to pay for junk. Does anyone know if these are any good, or can suggest a similar item?

Russ
2005-Apr-25, 05:18 PM
I have never used one of these so I can't say how good they really are. I did note, however, that the pixel counts are not very high. That means they will produce grainy images on the TV.

May I suggest that you order one, try it, and if it is no good send it back for a refund.

If you do this, we expect a full product review from you per the laws of the BABB. Any time you get any new junque, you have to tell us all about it.

(edit to add)PS - It sounds like your telescope and periferals is brand new and you haven't told us all about it. You are required to tell us all about the scope, eye pieces, any other scope jewelry you may have.

sparticus1701
2005-Apr-25, 05:27 PM
I did a long time ago; I've had the scope almost a year, but my life has prohibited me from using it too much.

The skinny:
-Celestron Nexstar 11 GPS
-40mm, 32mm, 25mm, 9mm Plossls and 2x Barlow
-I made myself the cable to the computer.

I bought it on ebay for a great price, UPS dropped it and smashed the glass. They paid for it to be completely refurbished by Celestron, so it's like new.

I need to clean the lenses, the previous owner didn't keep them very clean. Are rubbing alcohol and cotton swabs OK?

I would like some digital imaging abilities, but also some smaller lenses for some closer viewing.

Russ
2005-Apr-25, 05:42 PM
I
I need to clean the lenses, the previous owner didn't keep them very clean. Are rubbing alcohol and cotton swabs OK?


Clean your lenses as INfrequently as possible. Unless they are filthy they probably aren't impeding your ability to see.

If you must clean them, use alchohal that is as close to pure as you can get. Not less than 91% worst case. Yes, use cotton balls. Start at the center and, using as little pressure as possible, take one stroke out to the edge, slowly rotating a new surface of the cotton ball as you go. Throw away the cotton ball, get another and repeat the process until complete.

It is important that you use a new cotton ball with each stroke so you don't scratch the coatings or glass with particles you just mopped off the with the previous stroke. That is also why you slowly rotate the ball as you swipe.

Both Astronomy Magazine and Sky & Telescope have instructions on their sites. I highly recomend that you read both. :D

Charlie in Dayton
2005-Apr-26, 10:08 AM
"Digital imaging capability" and 'electronic imaging eyepiece' are two separate kettles of fish...

D-I-C involves a digital camera, time exposures, multiple frames, and processing software for a still picture...most likely a very impressive one, but a still picture. (NOTE -- this includes the images captured by modified webcams.)

E-I-E involves a live TV picture real time from a camera that replaces the eyepiece, and is displayed on a TV/monitor. These cameras are not time-exposure devices, so they do rather poorly on anything that's dim. They're great for pix of the moon, and maybe with a Barlow lens they'll work for Jupiter/Saturn/Mars when those planets are at perigee, but don't even expect an image of a starfield...the camera just isn't that sensitive.

That being said, one of those cameras and a little battery-powered B&W TV are great at show'n'tells, when you're showing the curtain climbers the Moon...this way, everyone can see at once, and they're not doing chin-ups on your focuser. Also works quite well with a solar filter, to show or record sunspots.

Beyond that, though, there isn't that much of an astronomical use for it that I'm aware of. I know lots of people who specialize in astronomical imaging, and other than the occasional group show'n'tell, no one uses that equipment. There are other kinds of cameras that will capture analog images (Google for AstroVid) for storage on tape/frame capture for later processing, but be prepared to spend cubic quantities of cash for them. We're talking professional-grade video cameras here -- hi res = hi cost.

mickal555
2005-Apr-26, 11:37 AM
We have a deep sky imager thanks to a grant, and we tried to use it on the moon but even jupiter was too bright. Stopped it down to about 4" before we gave up.....

badprof
2005-Apr-26, 02:07 PM
We have a deep sky imager thanks to a grant, and we tried to use it on the moon but even jupiter was too bright. Stopped it down to about 4" before we gave up.....

You could try using a polarising filter or even a neutral density filter to tone down the brightness.

Regards,