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Captain Kidd
2005-May-22, 08:57 PM
So I’m fixing the bathroom sink. I now fully support plumbers charging an arm and a leg for labor; hopefully I’ll be able to pop my shoulder back into joint sometime soon. And the scraps will heal eventually where I discovered every nail that was 1/16th of an inch longer than the wood it was driven through was thick. Anyways, a few months ago we noticed that there was an oh-so-slight drip where the drain plug actuator penetrates the pipe. No biggie, we put a cup under it and I started pondering ways to fix it without calling said plumber (I'm pretty sure a job requirement is to be a contortionist).

Then we noticed that somehow this drip was avoiding the cup and had created a rather alarmingly large puddle. So, we got a bigger cup.

Well, that didn’t work either. The puddle had grown to the scale of Lake Michigan; due to us thinking the other was monitoring the situation. Yet there was barely anything in the tub we had put under the supposed drip. And to add to the joy, now there’s minor water damage to the bottom of the cabinet. Fortunately the floor seems to be fine.

As it turns out, the stupid drain plug drip was acting as a diversion for a second, and bigger, leak: the hot water isolation valve. #-o

So this puts us, finally, into the realm of the topic title.

A coworker had given me some teflon rope packing on the theory that the packing had dried up. (Which was true but I ended up having to replace the entire valve due to the stem packing being a stupid fitted washer type rather than teflon or graphite rope. Our local Lowe’s possesses every kind of packing and washer imaginable for home use except for the one I needed… figures that I’d get a mutant valve.)

To get to said packing, the easiest way to do it was to first remove the handle which was held on by a screw. So out comes the trusty magnetic, ratcheting, multi-tipped screwdriver with 5 types of ends stored in the handle. I open it up… and drop it. How, I still don’t know, one minute it’s in my hand, the next it’s on the floor.

And every tip went into the A/C register a foot away. :x

After a few choice bleeps, I open the register, reach in, and pull out a measuring tape.

I stared blankly at it for a second and then did a quick mental count of how many 24’ yellow plastic measuring tapes I own and how many of them I had brought with me to the bathroom. After concluding that zero is indeed the correct number for both categories, I look at my wife, who’s been covering the baby’s ears at each bleep, and said something about at least we came out ahead by getting a free measuring tape. (I own two 24 footers already so I wasn’t sure why I would need a third. 72 feet might need to be measured occasionally, but that’s why I have a 100-foot tape.)

So I happily pull it out a couple feet and let go. Nothing. Bleep. So I still have two 24-foot measuring tapes.

Tomorrow I’m planning on seeing what other treasures I can find in the other air conditioning vents in the house.

frogesque
2005-May-22, 09:52 PM
Ahh... The joys of DIY plumbing :lol:

Maksutov
2005-May-23, 12:55 AM
This looks like it deserves a "running" commentary as I read it.


So I’m fixing the bathroom sink. I now fully support plumbers charging an arm and a leg for labor; hopefully I’ll be able to pop my shoulder back into joint sometime soon. And the scraps will heal eventually where I discovered every nail that was 1/16th of an inch longer than the wood it was driven through was thick. Anyways, a few months ago we noticed that there was an oh-so-slight drip where the drain plug actuator penetrates the pipe. No biggie, we put a cup under it and I started pondering ways to fix it without calling said plumber (I'm pretty sure a job requirement is to be a contortionist).
Leaks never come from where they obviously originate.


Then we noticed that somehow this drip was avoiding the cup and had created a rather alarmingly large puddle. So, we got a bigger cup.
Yup, has to be from a water supply source if it's getting bigger. You already know the water in the sink has gone done the drain.


Well, that didn’t work either. The puddle had grown to the scale of Lake Michigan; due to us thinking the other was monitoring the situation. Yet there was barely anything in the tub we had put under the supposed drip. And to add to the joy, now there’s minor water damage to the bottom of the cabinet. Fortunately the floor seems to be fine.
A watched drip rarely increases.


As it turns out, the stupid drain plug drip was acting as a diversion for a second, and bigger, leak: the hot water isolation valve. #-o
The same principle applies to roof leaks. Remember that for future fun.


So this puts us, finally, into the realm of the topic title.

A coworker had given me some teflon rope packing on the theory that the packing had dried up. (Which was true but I ended up having to replace the entire valve due to the stem packing being a stupid fitted washer type rather than teflon or graphite rope.
But the designer probably saved 0.5 cents on material and manufacturing costs for each valve, thus earning himself a big bonus at review time. But that doesn't help you, does it?


Our local Lowe’s possesses every kind of packing and washer imaginable for home use except for the one I needed… figures that I’d get a mutant valve.)
Lowe's Law:

We've got inventory like no one's ever seen before and clean stores with few falling hazards, except we won't have the particular item you need.

Home Depot Hypothesis:

We've got inventory like no one's ever seen before and dirty stores with falling hazards galore, except we won't have the particular item you need.


To get to said packing, the easiest way to do it was to first remove the handle which was held on by a screw. So out comes the trusty magnetic, ratcheting, multi-tipped screwdriver with 5 types of ends stored in the handle. I open it up… and drop it. How, I still don’t know, one minute it’s in my hand, the next it’s on the floor.

And every tip went into the A/C register a foot away. :x
Funny how those small parts traps always reveal themselves by demonstration rather than during the pre-repair survey.


After a few choice bleeps, I open the register, reach in, and pull out a measuring tape.

I stared blankly at it for a second and then did a quick mental count of how many 24’ yellow plastic measuring tapes I own and how many of them I had brought with me to the bathroom. After concluding that zero is indeed the correct number for both categories, I look at my wife, who’s been covering the baby’s ears at each bleep, and said something about at least we came out ahead by getting a free measuring tape. (I own two 24 footers already so I wasn’t sure why I would need a third. 72 feet might need to be measured occasionally, but that’s why I have a 100-foot tape.)

So I happily pull it out a couple feet and let go. Nothing. Bleep. So I still have two 24-foot measuring tapes.
At least you found something useful. All I could do with the Coke cans I found was recycle them.


Tomorrow I’m planning on seeing what other treasures I can find in the other air conditioning vents in the house.
It's amazing what you can find. One other aspect of buying a new house is finding roofing nails in the driveway, with your tires.

Concerning plumbers, the old saw about doing it right the first time comes to mind, with the additional corollary of completing the job the first time. As you hinted at, that's why a good, licensed plumber can demand such a large fee. Part of the charge is the assurance that the job will be done right and finished in one visit.

Now let's talk about HVAC units and control boards... :o

Captain Kidd
2005-May-23, 02:33 AM
The drain plug was a whole ‘nother fiasco.

Home repair discoveries part two

I pull out the drain plug actuator and discover that it keeps the water in the pipe via a ball and socket joint. So, I pry out the gasket and figure that it is also on the old side hence the leak.

Fortunately, Lowe’s Law (I like that) failed to catch that and I got a new washer. Actually I deiced to go with a variety pack of washers risking Murphy’s Law kicking in and that size not being in it.

So I get home, go through the tape measure he…ck and proceed to the drain plug. Do you realize how many freaking, bleeping, parts there are to a simple plug? The knob that you pull is connected to a flat plate with the edges honed to razor sharpness which in turn is connected to the actuator rod that works the plug. I.E. the more moving parts the better to frustrate the first time DIY plumber.

So I get the washer in nice and easy and go to put the actuator back in. A bit of grunting as the afore mentioned razor-plate had just barely not enough flexibility to allow the actuation back into the hole. Finally I get it in, whoop a cheer, and before putting the nut back on, test the drain.

I almost knock a tooth out as the blasted knob comes flying out of the sink. I hear a clank! Rattle! Rattle! as everything falls out.

Bleepity-bleep-bleep. (At this point my wife decides that to prevent our son from leaning interesting new words, occupying him in the other end of the house might be ideal.)

The razor-plate uses a compression screw to allow for the knob-rod (don’t you just love my technical terms?) to be adjusted for height. Said screw came loose (and mine were easing up at this point too).

After 30 minutes of grumbling, I finally get it back together (after pulling that bleeping rod out 3 more times). Finally I decide to try it from a different angle as it’s in the back of the cabinet and if I dislocation my [i]other shoulder, maybe I can reach the set screw to get it correctly tightened (as in so tight I’ll crimp that bleeping rod that way it can’t slide loose even if the screw falls out).

So I start cleaning out the other side under the sink.

Women.

Women and chemicals.

Women and multiple chemicals that, to my brief scan of the labels, all do the same thing so why 10 versions?

My stuff fits in a small toiletry bag; that stuff took 10 minutes of stacking on, then tossing into, the bathtub. And that was just facial stuff. I had to do the same with all the other skin and hair care stuff to get into the left side.

Finally I’m nearing the end and “Hello, what do we have here?”

An oddly thick piece of plastic that’s concave on one side and remnants of black rubber that looks suspiciously like gasket material on the other. And that concave side is shaped awfully similar to the ball on the actuator.

Duh!

At some point prior to us buying the house, the previous owners did some DIY (or hired a really incompetent plumber) and forgot to put this part back in.

So I redissamble the drain and put this part back in. Fortunately it seemed to have gotten tired of playing “let’s see how long before this bloke cracks and goes for the log splitter in the garage” and went back together nice and peaceful like.

So far no drip.

(Disclaimer: While the above events did happen and basically in that order, the number of bleeps and various reactions might have been exaggerated.)

The Supreme Canuck
2005-May-23, 02:42 AM
So far no drip.

Ooh, mistake. Now you're standing in six inches of water, right?

Gillianren
2005-May-23, 05:00 AM
for once--and oh, it's rare--you've made me glad I live in an apartment. home repair for apartment owners equals telling the manager that it's broken. and while I did, for a while a few years ago, live in an apartment where that didn't actually fix anything, the management at my current place is wonderful.

enginelessjohn
2005-May-23, 07:52 AM
Well I'm in the process of renovating my house. No long stories as I spent most of my waking hours over the weekend up a ladder, painting. I'm back at work for a nap...

But I've been through the plumbing thing, and can now drain my central heating in under 30 minutes. I have also been researching whole new categories of swearing, and just as soon as I find a university that acknowleges this as a valid area for academic study I shall be submitting a thesis.... :)

But most of the proper scaries are from DIY electrics. Why do people with no concept of electricity insist on working on the mains? Bad plumbing can wreck your house, but bad wiring can kill you....

Cheers
John

Van Rijn
2005-May-23, 09:07 AM
But most of the proper scaries are from DIY electrics. Why do people with no concept of electricity insist on working on the mains? Bad plumbing can wreck your house, but bad wiring can kill you....

Cheers
John

Well, I wouldn't want a clueless person working on either plumbing or electrical work, and it is a VERY good idea to have some familiarity with the electrical code, but I generally prefer electrical work over plumbing. The one exception is if I am working with plastic pipe. But with metal pipe, there is ALWAYS one leak that must be fixed before you are done, and the old pipe is nearly impossible to work with.

Electrical can be "fun" though - some years ago, the fan motor on the old central air system compressor died. Of course, this only happens in a heat wave and temperatures were about as high as they ever get here (110F/43C). The choices were to replace the motor myself or wait 3 or 4 days for someone to come out and replace it. From a technical standpoint it wasn't that big a deal, but there were only a few inches of clearance to get to the fan motor, and the compressor was placed in an incredibly bad location. It was IN SUN during the day, which was horrible for efficiency, and made it effectively impossible to work on it during the day. So I ended up squezing between a still hot wall and the compressor at night, working with bad lighting. But I did get it working, after many scrapes and liberal swearing.

frogesque
2005-May-23, 09:40 AM
The only things I won't touch are gas (not Corgi registered which is a legal requirement in the UK for domestic installations) and roofs which I feel is a specialised area (especially for old slate roofs) and requires experience and insurance. Otherwise it's mainly a question of planning and logically following the work through with an understanding of what you are doing and why.

Captain Kidd
2005-May-23, 11:39 AM
Ah electrical work. When we moved in, we decided to shift some ceiling fans around. The previous owners, more likely the contractor, went the cheap route and used the cheap standard model. i.e. plain and boring. Plus they had fancy light over a pool table in the finished basement which they took leaving us with an empty fixture.

So we played musical ceiling fans. We bought a fancy ceiling fan for our bedroom and took the one that had been in there to living room because it sounded like a bearing was going bad. We put that on in the empty fixture in the basement to milk out a tad bit more life (and after everything else we had bought, funds were getting a tad low). Then we replaced the dining room’s light with a fancier one.

Yeah, I want whatever that electrician was smoking at the time. The breakers were labeled, unfortunately that’s where it ended. I think the bedroom was correct, however the dining room was a mess. Two outlets fed off the identified breaker. Another fed off the kitchen. The light fed off the upstairs bedroom. I think the same was with the basement. The plugins were on one curcuit (labelled correctly) and the lights fed off the room above.

Recently I did something to an outlet and rather than test every breaker, I just threw the main.

Gillianren heh, yeah now I have to cover all repairs, pest control, yard work, etc. But, no more vibrating floors at odd hours when the downstairs neighbor decides to crank up the stereo or too-loud chatter in the hallway outside or unable to paint the walls. The pros are still out weighing the cons.

Gillianren
2005-May-23, 07:57 PM
Gillianren heh, yeah now I have to cover all repairs, pest control, yard work, etc. But, no more vibrating floors at odd hours when the downstairs neighbor decides to crank up the stereo or too-loud chatter in the hallway outside or unable to paint the walls. The pros are still out weighing the cons.

ah, but we are the downstairs neighbor, on account of I've got bad knees and don't handle climbing stairs too well, most days. no hallway outside; all units open to the lovely scenic outdoors. trees and rhododendrons and duck ponds, oh my. still, I did say that it was rare that I was glad to be living in an apartment.

my parents bought a fixer-upper when I was, oh, five or so. (don't remember exactly, but it fits into a very narrow two-year window, as at the time, I had both a younger sister and a living father.) after Dad died, Mom couldn't afford to keep, well, fixing it up. she has the old Time Life home repair books, and she taught herself at least the basics about everything but electricity. said she didn't feel comfortable doing it, so she didn't. to this day, I know slightly more about plumbing than most of my friends and probably could, in a pinch, fix a sprinkler system that wasn't automatic.

why the sprinkler system? well, my mom's got a huge yard, and so she installed lawn sprinklers in the front and side yard. unfortunately, the turn-on for the side yard is placed badly relative to the driveway, which is long, narrow, and crooked. it got run over on a regular basis. not by us, of course, but there's a mother-in-law house on the property that my mom rents out, and either the tenants or their visitors ran over the thing all the time. at one point, to prevent this, my mom put a huge, terra cotta pot upside down over it, to at least make it visible to people backing out of the driveway.

you guessed it--someone broke the pot.

so anyway, I spent quite a lot of time watching my mother fix sprinklers. and swear under her breath.

Van Rijn
2005-May-23, 09:11 PM
Heh. I had a somewhat similar situation. Many years before I was born, my parents built a house - they brought in people, but did a lot of the work themselves. My father died when I was 13, and "do it yourself" wasn't exactly a foreign concept in our family, so I learned to do a lot of it. Then there was the fixer upper house we moved to that was in a much better location than the old one ...

There are some things I won't do, but I have installed all kitchen appliances, gas water heaters, sinks, faucets, toilets, plumbed a shower, wired rooms, etc. Mostly it is a matter of being careful and using a LOT of elbow grease. And while I can do it, I am painfully slow compared to a professional. As for watering systems: As long as it uses plastic pipe, I don't mind repair very much, but installation of a large system is not fun, especially when you have to go under walkways and retention walls in hard soil.

I do strictly avoid automobile repair. Most new cars are almost impossible to work on anyway.

jfribrg
2005-May-23, 09:12 PM
My own faucet/Home Depot/Lowes story follows:

I needed a replacement nozzle for a kitchen sink sprayer. I went to the local Home Depot, showed it to the plumbing guy, who looked at it and after seeing the brand name, told me that they dont carry replacement parts for Moen, or at least not for Moen sprayers. I pointed out that the exact sprayer can be found in the "new kitchens" section. I rhetorically asked why they will sell Moen sinks but not Moen parts. He didn't have an answer, nor did I expect one. After all, he isn't the one who decides what inventory to carry. I then tried Lowes with the same degree of success. I had to replace the entire sprayer, hose and all. I now know how to get the tub part of the sink out and put it back because that is what I had to do to get at the pipes. Five hours (counting the trips to the stores) wasted instead of 10 minutes (not counting the trip).

Trebuchet
2005-May-23, 10:40 PM
We have a vacation home in a small town. Where they still have not just one, but two, REAL HARDWARE STORES! Where you can actually find stuff, unlike HD or Lowe's. And the staff knows something about it. No such stores here in the urban area, alas. All driven out.

They also have a couple of good nurseries for plants and flowers. Also driven out of the urban areas by HD and Lowe's, whose stuff is not so good.

Regarding the DIY adventures, years ago I realized that there was a door in the house that went from the bedroom hallway out into the carport. I'd lived there two years and never opened it. So I removed the door, sided and sheetrocked over the opening, and made the stub of the hallway into a closet. All very fine, except that when I walled off the stub to create the closet, I put the new wall ON TOP OF THE CARPET. Just nailed her right down. I've often wondered how long it took the new owners to find that....

The Supreme Canuck
2005-May-23, 10:44 PM
Contractors aren't always better. My aunt and uncle moved into a new house and found that there was a scratch on one of the walls. They called in the painter to have him fix it, but he got paint on the carpet. So they had the carpet replaced. But of course the carpet guys scratched the wall, so they called the painter back in, and...

:roll:

jfribrg
2005-May-23, 11:59 PM
Personally, I am glad that Home Depot is around, despite the fact that they don't carry replacement parts for Moen sprayers. They carry far more items than a small hardware store can possibly carry, and its not just a hardware store. its a garden center, patio/fireplace store, etc. There is a local hardware store that I patronize, because I know better than to ask for advice from one of the Home Depot associates.

Captain Kidd
2005-May-24, 12:51 AM
Ok, this will probably convince some that I live in the Adam's Family house.

On contractors, one story the sellers related to us, after we signed the contract, was that when the house was being built they came by for a visit. The walls were mostly bare studs, the sheetrock had just started to be hung. They squeeze between a couple studs into the kitchen and were admiring it when it struck them that something was funny.

It took them a few minutes before they realized that there was no doorway just walls all the way around. The contractor happened to be on site so they asked him about it. Without missing a beat he replied, "that's what the pass though is for."

Trebuchet
2005-May-24, 02:25 AM
Personally, I am glad that Home Depot is around, despite the fact that they don't carry replacement parts for Moen sprayers. They carry far more items than a small hardware store can possibly carry, and its not just a hardware store. its a garden center, patio/fireplace store, etc. There is a local hardware store that I patronize, because I know better than to ask for advice from one of the Home Depot associates.

Yes, they carry lots of stuff. Most of which I do not want. Yes, I shop at HD for some things but for real hardware, I have to leave town. If, for instance, I want nuts and bolts of higher strength than well-aged cheddar. You are most fortunate to have both a local hardware store and HD within reach. In most cases, I suspect, the little guys have been driven out.

Maksutov
2005-May-24, 03:43 AM
Fortunately, Lowe’s Law (I like that) failed to catch that and I got a new washer. Actually I deiced to go with a variety pack of washers risking Murphy’s Law kicking in and that size not being in it.

That's

Lowe's Law: Corollary No. 1

If we do have what you need, it will be either packaged with a bunch of stuff you don't need or packaged in multiples of 2, 4, 6, 8, etc. All these packages will be sealed bags, boxes, or bubble-packs, for your convenience.


So I start cleaning out the other side under the sink.

Women.

Women and chemicals.

Women and multiple chemicals that, to my brief scan of the labels, all do the same thing so why 10 versions?
The ninth one was purchased because it was much cheaper than the other eight. The tenth one was purchased because it might just be better than the previous nine. The seventh one was purchased because it was much cheaper than the other six. The eighth one was purchased because it might be better than the other seven. Sense a pattern?

Three years after the last woman lived here I'm still finding and tossing conditioners, herbal balms, split-end curers, etc. :roll:

Maksutov
2005-May-24, 04:27 AM
My own faucet/Home Depot/Lowes story follows:

I needed a replacement nozzle for a kitchen sink sprayer. I went to the local Home Depot, showed it to the plumbing guy, who looked at it and after seeing the brand name, told me that they dont carry replacement parts for Moen, or at least not for Moen sprayers. I pointed out that the exact sprayer can be found in the "new kitchens" section. I rhetorically asked why they will sell Moen sinks but not Moen parts. He didn't have an answer, nor did I expect one. After all, he isn't the one who decides what inventory to carry. I then tried Lowes with the same degree of success. I had to replace the entire sprayer, hose and all. I now know how to get the tub part of the sink out and put it back because that is what I had to do to get at the pipes. Five hours (counting the trips to the stores) wasted instead of 10 minutes (not counting the trip).
That's an example of

Home Depot Hypothesis: Implication No. 1

The replacement part you need will be a component of a larger assembly consisting of the same parts which, on your existing assembly, are in perfect working order, minus one. The cost of the replacement assembly will be related to the cost of the needed part by the following equation:

http://img279.echo.cx/img279/4818/priceequation1mh.th.jpg (http://img279.echo.cx/my.php?image=priceequation1mh.jpg)

aurora
2005-May-24, 04:31 PM
My own faucet/Home Depot/Lowes story follows:


I've noticed a few things about our local HD:

1. Employees are always too busy to help you
2. If you see an employee that is not busy, that employee will run away from you
3. the parking lot is always full, presumably from people that are roaming the aisles trying to catch an employee to ask a question
4. If you do catch an employee, it will be the wrong sort of employee, one who does not work in the area you are in, but the employee will helpfully call someone who can help. And who will never show up.
5. If you somehow make it to the check stand, do not ever (no matter how short the line is) use the automated check out line.

regarding #5, my wife and I finally did make it to the check out stand and I stupidly went to the automatic checker line. We started putting our things through one at a time, and then we noticed that we had (out of several casters) picked up one that didn't match the others. That is when the fun started. We tried to replace the one we didn't want with another that was what we needed. The system couldn't handle it. It's too painful an experience to relate the details here, but needless to say that many minutes later and after many attempts by an employee to pacify or reset the system and make it work -- it didn't. We finally gave up and got in one of the long lines with a real human running a cash register.

I've worked with automated systems for many years, but I cannot believe the horrific user interface they designed for theirs.

jfribrg
2005-May-24, 04:47 PM
I've worked with automated systems for many years, but I cannot believe the horrific user interface they designed for theirs.

I haven't had any problems with automated checkout, but I do adhere to three rules:
1) Make sure everything has a bar code. If I have loose nuts or nails or something, I use a flesh-and-blood cashier
2) If it wont fit on the "paid items" shelf easily, I use a cashier.
3) If the line is short and the cashier is especially cute, I use the cashier.

Gramma loreto
2005-May-24, 05:44 PM
Talk about DIY...I've been busy in that department. My wife and I bought our house back in July, making the both of us middle-aged first-time homeowners. I've looked forward to having a house to putter around in for a long, long time. I'm pretty handy and I've watched the DIY shows and read the magazines for years. The high points of home improvement have so far included...
Kitchen—removed wallpaper, retextured walls, and repainted all.
Kitchen—removed countertops and repaired cabinets to allow installation of quartz countertops.
Kitchen—replaced light fixtures.
Kitchen—replaced faucet.
Kitchen—installed tile backsplash.
Bath—replaced toilets and all wall hardware.
Garage—demolished small room and hodge-podge wood shelves.
Garage—installed wire shelving throughout.
Exterior—replaced all (108 LF) raingutters...included replacement of one fascia board and trenching of two drain pipes.
Exterior—replaced all lighting.
Exterior—removed dozens of snow-damaged trees.
Exterior—replaced rotting boardwalk with stone-lined mulch pathI've also done the miscellaneous plumbing repairs. Parts are no longer available for our washer supply line valves...one was leaking...but the fellow at the plumbing supply told me about twisting the teflon tape into a rope and using it as packing. It worked like a champ...and still does, months later.

Regarding Lowes, I have to say I'm a satisfied customer...warts and all. I used to be sold on Sears/Kenmore. Bought a few appliances from them in years past and was satisfied with 'em. This time, I couldn't find a knowledgeable salesperson to save my life. I had to correct one guy about the specs for a washer we were considering. We went to Lowes.

The guy in the appliance department there knew his stuff, we got a good price, delivery, and service after the sale. Refrigerator, washer, dryer, monster grill (Grill-zilla, per the wife), lawn mower, trimmer, chain saw, and sundry other tools and implements...Lowes. New Quartz countertops...Lowes. New freezer...Lowes. Special order shades for darn near every window in the house...just arrived at Lowes. Sure, they don't always have what I need and there's been the occasional snafu...but any time something wasn't right, they made it right.

Gillianren
2005-May-24, 06:22 PM
my sister, having not learned from our mother, bought a fixer-upper with her husband a year or two ago. not content with this, she actually wants us to fly back to California to help repair Mom's house.

now, aside from all the personal reasons I have for not wanting to spend any great length of time at my mother's house, my home repair knowledge is pretty much still all gleaned from watching my mother do things, and the house needs things done to it that, if Mom did them at all, she did when I was young and not since, so I'd be no help with them. but even aside from that, I'm unemployed and can't afford the trip from Olympia (well, SeaTac's the closest airport)--and I have scoliosis and arthritis, and I can only be helpful for a limited amount of time before I need a heating pad and a lie-down.

does anyone else think this is a bad plan on my sister's part?

teddyv
2005-May-24, 06:44 PM
my sister, having not learned from our mother, bought a fixer-upper with her husband a year or two ago. not content with this, she actually wants us to fly back to California to help repair Mom's house.

now, aside from all the personal reasons I have for not wanting to spend any great length of time at my mother's house, my home repair knowledge is pretty much still all gleaned from watching my mother do things, and the house needs things done to it that, if Mom did them at all, she did when I was young and not since, so I'd be no help with them. but even aside from that, I'm unemployed and can't afford the trip from Olympia (well, SeaTac's the closest airport)--and I have scoliosis and arthritis, and I can only be helpful for a limited amount of time before I need a heating pad and a lie-down.

does anyone else think this is a bad plan on my sister's part?

Is the bad plan you refer to the one that includes you in the home repair plan? If you are physically and financially limited then the plan for you to go is a non-starter.