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banquo's_bumble_puppy
2005-May-24, 06:20 PM
So...does anyone else believe that your pet cockatoo/parrot or cockatiel might actually be the living decendant of t-Rex?, (well not necessarily t-rex, but...).

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6191512/

Polly wanna cracker grrrrrrrrrr.........?

Kullat Nunu
2005-May-24, 06:37 PM
I don't. Tyrannosaurids appeared long after the first birds arrived. ;)

But really, Tyrannosaurus is actually quite closely related to birds. Dromaeosaurids like Velociraptor or Deinonychus are even closer.

Russ
2005-May-24, 08:28 PM
So...does anyone else believe that your pet cockatoo/parrot or cockatiel might actually be the living decendant of t-Rex?, (well not necessarily t-rex, but...).

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6191512/

Polly wanna cracker grrrrrrrrrr.........?

I saw a TV program some years ago, can't remember if it was PBS, Discovery or Nat. Geo., about birds being Dino Decendants. The show was suporting this point of view.

At the end, in an effort to be non-partial, they had one paleo-biology proffesor espousing the opposing point of view. This prof. called it the B.A.D.D. hypothisis, BADD standing for Birds Are Dinosaur Decendants. To put it mildly, he demolished the BADD hypothisis and then trounced it for good measure.

I gather that the director didn't get this segment until right before his deadline as he was clearly embarrassed while trying to support the original point of view and knowing that the last paleo-biologist ripped the primis to shreads.

I wish I could remember the name of the show and who produced it. The paleo-biologist at the end was quite humorous in his presentation of why the BADD hypothisis was wrong. :D

John M. Dollan
2005-May-24, 08:31 PM
There are still a few hold-outs in the paleontological community, but I think it is generally accepted now that birds are descended from the Dinosaurs. Feathers certainly seem to be the clincher....

As an aside, a shame that we can't have avatars here; mine is typically a variation of the feathered Dinosaur.

...John...

Swift
2005-May-24, 08:51 PM
There are still a few hold-outs in the paleontological community, but I think it is generally accepted now that birds are descended from the Dinosaurs. Feathers certainly seem to be the clincher....

As an aside, a shame that we can't have avatars here; mine is typically a variation of the feathered Dinosaur.

...John...
The current show at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History: Feathered Dinosaurs: The Bird-Dinosaur Connection (http://www.cmnh.org/exhibits/featheredindex.html)

Think you know birds? The next time you watch birds fluttering around a feeder, consider that you're looking at the living descendants of the dinosaurs. Some of the brightest minds in science have been probing the boundaries between birds and dinosaurs. Spectacular fossil finds over the past decade have given new insights into birds' ancient past, and also revealed new questions

Donnie B.
2005-May-24, 09:11 PM
The current (May) issue of Natural History is devoted to dinosaurs. It includes a detailed cladogram (family tree, in layman's terms) of the dinosaurs, showing exactly where the bird lineage branched off.

The current best evidence is that birds descended from dinosaurs, but not all dinosaurs are bird ancestors.

Interestingly enough, the major branch of dinosaurs whose name translates as "bird-hipped", the Ornithischians, is not the branch from which birds descended! (They come from the Saurischian, or "lizard-hipped", branch.)

Russ
2005-May-24, 09:47 PM
There are still a few hold-outs in the paleontological community, but I think it is generally accepted now that birds are descended from the Dinosaurs. Feathers certainly seem to be the clincher....

As an aside, a shame that we can't have avatars here; mine is typically a variation of the feathered Dinosaur.

...John...

I'm willing to entertain the possibility that birds evolved from a birdlike dinosaur like Archaeopteryx but you're sure going to play h--l convincing me that T. Rex, Brachiosaur, Triceratops, et. alia, is in their lineage. :lol:

[pompus voice]"I'm brontosourus on my monthers side." bragged the little salamander[/pompus vioce]

mike alexander
2005-May-25, 06:07 AM
No, the tyrannosaurids are on a different branch. The last common ancestors for them would be the maniraptoriformes. The closest group to Aves would be the dromeosaurids.

Enzp
2005-May-25, 09:05 AM
I don't think anyone other than the unwashed masses really claims Trex as a bird ancestor, rather they use Trex as just a metaphor for dinosaurs in general, just like someone might call a gorilla a big monkey.

Maksutov
2005-May-25, 09:16 AM
I don't think anyone other than the unwashed masses really claims Trex as a bird ancestor, rather they use Trex as just a metaphor for dinosaurs in general, just like someone might call a gorilla a big monkey.
Hmmm, Kong Rex. Now there's an interesting hybrid!

http://www.click-smilies.de/sammlung0304/tiere/animal-smiley-052.gif

Enzp
2005-May-26, 01:01 AM
He is mighty, but his arms are too short to beat his chest with.

Maksutov
2005-May-26, 01:18 AM
My son's budgie had a mean streak a mile wide. Must have been the velociraptor in him coming out! :evil:

http://www.cosgan.de/images/smilie/tiere/r030.gif