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Glom
2005-May-25, 04:32 PM
When did mobile phones become such a central part of life? There are loads of adverts abotu electronic ring tones, available in a variety of formats that you can get for your phones. They record video, then can be used to check e-mail. Soon, mobile phones will rule the world.

Captain Kidd
2005-May-25, 04:41 PM
We don't have a "regular" phone anymore. We each have a cell phone and I'm halfway tempted to drop one (additionaly $20/mo so it's not too hediously expensive) if it weren't for the fact that I'll occasionally do a lot of driving out into thte sticks. Plus we only had one car so with a new baby we wanted a way my wife could get in touch with me in case of an emergency. Now though, a single phone might help offset the added fuel bills.

With the stuff that looks to be on the horizon, especially in Japan, I'd say it's not going to be too long before there's some extreme changes to life as we know it. (Techonologically-wise) Devices that are parts PDA, phone, tv, radio, etc.; a computer in you pocket so to speak.

NPR had an article about swipeless credit cards having a major unveiling in Atlanta, GA today or this weekend. Eventually we'll probably see those go away too and you'll just pull out your whatchamadigit and hit a confirmation button/PIN and it'll route the transaction for you to a dredit card, bank draft, or whatever.

A Thousand Pardons
2005-May-25, 04:44 PM
When did mobile phones become such a central part of life?When? Did you just wake up, Rip?

Twelve years ago, a guy gave a talk in our department and swore that every house in the USA would be connected to high speed fiberoptic internet within five years. Obviously, a little optimistic, but most in his audience would probably be surprised at what has happened. I know Bill Gates was.

It's hard to predict the future, you have to live it. So, the next big breakthrough will be brain stem connectors, implants that can communicate on the wireless grid. They'll be expensive, but the media companies will offer free liposuction with each installation.

Tensor
2005-May-25, 04:50 PM
It's hard to predict the future, you have to live it. So, the next big breakthrough will be brain stem connectors, implants that can communicate on the wireless grid. They'll be expensive, but the media companies will offer free liposuction with each installation.

Hmmmm, changed over to marketing did you? That lipsuction bonus is a great idea. Have the implants and the lipsuction done at the same time. :)

Gillianren
2005-May-25, 06:57 PM
has anyone else seen and been annoyed by that commercial where the kids in the family are trying to convince their parents that they need cell phones? no one seems to have taught these children the concept of "land line." when I was their age, we didn't have cell phones, dagnabbit (okay, some people in my class in high school had pagers by graduation), and we got by just fine. my mother got me a one-number calling card to use at pay phones if I needed to call home. heck, I still have it, so I can talk to my mother on her dime as often as I want, except she's never home.

in fact, I still don't have a cell phone, which is why I've noticed that pay phones are beginning to disappear. they seem to expect everyone to have cell phones and to carry them around at all times. heck, two different cell phones went off in the theatre when I was watching Episode III, and I'm pretty sure someone a dozen rows ahead of us was text messaging.

cell phones, I read I-don't-remember-where, possibly Snopes, are one of the three highest causes of car accidents, right up there with alcohol and falling asleep at the wheel. just about any time some idiot cuts off the car I'm riding in these days, there's the cell phone.

now. there are some conveniences to cell phones, yes. and certainly my friend Maria had hers with her and on at all times as my due date drew near, because she was my ride to the hospital. but I've seen people who don't make grocery lists because they can just call home to find out what they need. I've seen people almost get hit by buses because they're too entranced with their conversation to read that the sign says "don't walk."

the problem is, as it has been with so many other technologies, that people decide they need to have it at all times before they've made the necessary adjustments. a cell phone is not a replacement for your brain. you're still going to have to remember things. you're still going to have to pay attention to the world immediately surrounding you. the cell phone is a secondary consideration to the road. hang up and drive.

this rant brought to you by the people against unnecessary cell phone proliferation--PAUCPP. (we're working on it.)

Glom
2005-May-25, 07:03 PM
We have the cool "Please turn off your phone" adverts in movies and spot fines for phone driving are very strict.

Chief Engineer Scott
2005-May-25, 07:06 PM
Devices that are parts PDA, phone, tv, radio, etc.; a computer in you pocket so to speak.

What you want is a device called a Blackberry. Phone/PDA/Mail/etc :o

Tobin Dax
2005-May-25, 07:44 PM
We have the cool "Please turn off your phone" adverts in movies and spot fines for phone driving are very strict.

I like those fines. I saw a policeman a couple weeks ago in Indiana driving his unmarked car while talking on a cell phone. A cop! They should have more sense than that and be setting an example. :evil:

jumbo
2005-May-25, 08:05 PM
Sadly the spot fine message isnt really getting through. Today coming back from work i had to pull over as an ambulance was stuck in oncoming traffic. My pulling over allowed it to get round the blockage by driving up my side of the road. The woman behind didnt notice this as she was far to engrossed in her conversation on her mobile. She nearly blocked the ambulance off and came within inches of hitting me too.
When i fianlly moved off so did she. Still chatting on her phone and then fiddling with something on the passengers seat. So basically after nearly hitting me and swiping an ambulance she decided to carry on nattering whilst driving no handed. :evil:

Oh and if your in the UK i think we should have a law passed thatr says any phone with that &*&(&(& crazy frog ringtone on it should be immediatly thrown either under a lorry or into a deep dark murky pit!

Glom
2005-May-25, 08:16 PM
I kind of like the DJ one, but the incessent adverts are really annoying me now.

Gillianren
2005-May-25, 08:25 PM
we have "turn off your cell phone" announcements in the theatre, too. someone I was talking to on the MythBusters board said they were in a theatre once, and the teenage girl next to him answered her phone and starting chatting away. he turned to shush the girl, and her friend said, "can't you see she's on the phone?"

The Supreme Canuck
2005-May-25, 08:38 PM
I can't stand the way cell phones are going. If I want a camera, I'll buy a camera. If I want a TV, I'll buy a TV. Phones are for talking. Period. Even text messaging is too much. Why do we have the compulsion to always be in direct communication with everyone all the time?

Sure, call me a stick-in-the-mud, but it annoys me to no end!

Eta C
2005-May-25, 08:44 PM
It's hard to predict the future, you have to live it. So, the next big breakthrough will be brain stem connectors, implants that can communicate on the wireless grid.

Arrrrgh! The great Phone Company conspricy is true! Clearly the first step toward mind control!!!! Whistleblowers tried to warn us of just this threat 30+ years ago by making the movie The President's Analyst. [/ CT mode] :)

A great movie, by the way. While it's primarily about Cold War paranoia, one of the plot elements has The Phone Company as the true movers and shakers behind everything (take that Illuminati). Their ultimate goal is to place just this sort of device into everybody. It's up to Our Hero (played by James Coburn) to foil this nefarious scheme.

Van Rijn
2005-May-25, 08:56 PM
Arrrrgh! The great Phone Company conspricy is true! Clearly the first step toward mind control!!!! Whistleblowers tried to warn us of just this threat 30+ years ago by making the movie The President's Analyst. [/ CT mode] :)

A great movie, by the way. While it's primarily about Cold War paranoia, one of the plot elements has The Phone Company as the true movers and shakers behind everything (take that Illuminati). Their ultimate goal is to place just this sort of device into everybody. It's up to Our Hero (played by James Coburn) to foil this nefarious scheme.

I really liked that movie. It came out fairly recently on DVD. It is very "'60s" in style, but great fun. I was impressed with the brain implant bit with the discussion about microelectronics. Like anything, you can find an argument to justify the forecast, but that was pretty surprising, given the time the movie was done.

EvilBob
2005-May-26, 12:25 AM
This rant brought to you by the people against unnecessary cell phone proliferation--PAUCPP. (we're working on it.)
I'd like to join your organisation, and subscribe to your newletter...

Seriously, I hate the things. In my opinion, having to hear half of someone's conversation in public (why do people talk so loud into them?) is the passive smoking for the new millennium. I look forward to the day when the rumours are proved true (not that I hold much hope) and the mobile Phonies all die from brain tumours.... :wink:

I'll admit, we have one. It's never turned on, no-one knows the number, and we only use it if one of us is going somewhere, as an emergency phone. I can't imagine why I'd need to be contactable 24/7. And when you think about it, it's the really important, powerful people that you can never get on the phone. "I'm sorry, Mr. Rockefeller is in a meeting. Please go away and don't bother calling again..." It's only the lowest on the totem pole that are always available...

Gillian, how's my rant? Do I qualify?

tmosher
2005-May-26, 12:33 AM
At work we have a disincentive for cellphones with cameras - it's called confiscation because it's a security breach (we're a defense contractor).

I noticed a news item on Google News UK today - a cellphone that goes back to the basics - it's just a cell phone and nothing more.

Vodafone launches handset for phone-phobes (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/05/23/vodafone_phone_phobe/)

The Supreme Canuck
2005-May-26, 12:35 AM
Wow. That's ugly. Is it too much to ask for a nice looking phone? Just a phone?

pzkpfw
2005-May-26, 12:38 AM
Yes, Gillianren,


and I'm pretty sure someone a dozen rows ahead of us was text messaging.

I had a guy do that to me during "Chronicles of Riddick". A sign that I liked the movie so much was that I was able to (mostly) block the texter out.

How's this: in hospital, after my appendix was turned into an extract, I pointed out to the young(er) guy next to me the signs saying "don't use your cellphone".

He replied: "I'm only texting".

Cheers,

The Supreme Canuck
2005-May-26, 12:47 AM
Wow. What happens when someone pulls that in a blasting zone?

Maksutov
2005-May-26, 12:50 AM
has anyone else seen and been annoyed by that commercial where the kids in the family are trying to convince their parents that they need cell phones? no one seems to have taught these children the concept of "land line." when I was their age, we didn't have cell phones, dagnabbit (okay, some people in my class in high school had pagers by graduation), and we got by just fine. my mother got me a one-number calling card to use at pay phones if I needed to call home. heck, I still have it, so I can talk to my mother on her dime as often as I want, except she's never home.)[edit]
That ad is a classic example of advertising that doesn't provide you with information about the product, but, instead, attempts to create a need or want where there wasn't one before. These ads typically use such underlying themes as peer pressure, social status, etc., to influence their audiences.

When I was raising my son, he would occasionally be influenced by such ads. My response as a parent was to employ a two-letter word, "No." Plus I would explain how and why such a decision was reached, as part of teaching him essential critical thinking skills. After a while dissecting commercials became a popular sport for him, well, as popular as it could be for someone who eventually watched little TV and spent most of his time in basement workshop, or out riding his mountain bike or sailing. 8)

Maksutov
2005-May-26, 12:53 AM
It's hard to predict the future, you have to live it. So, the next big breakthrough will be brain stem connectors, implants that can communicate on the wireless grid.

Arrrrgh! The great Phone Company conspricy is true! Clearly the first step toward mind control!!!! Whistleblowers tried to warn us of just this threat 30+ years ago by making the movie The President's Analyst. [/ CT mode] :)

A great movie, by the way. While it's primarily about Cold War paranoia, one of the plot elements has The Phone Company as the true movers and shakers behind everything (take that Illuminati). Their ultimate goal is to place just this sort of device into everybody. It's up to Our Hero (played by James Coburn) to foil this nefarious scheme.
Looks like collegeguy should be joining this thread shortly. :wink:

captain swoop
2005-May-26, 08:57 AM
I don't have a landline anymore, I use a mobile phone and I have the same number on my Palm Communicator so I can use either. My phone doesn't have a camera or even colour screen, just very small and compact.


Ringtones Shmingtones

frogesque
2005-May-26, 09:16 AM
At a time when almost everyone you see has a mobile glued to one ear it's not uncommon now but I realised the mobile era had arrived a couple of years or so back when I was in a supermarket and watched an elderly lady pull an equally ancient 'brick' mobile from her hand bag and started shouting at her daughter about all the latest offers in the freezer cabinet.

My landline is a deal with my pc cable (Telewest) but I have been wondering whether to change it and go mobile only. I think mobiles have become much more acceptable and 'respectable' now and connectivity in the UK at least doesn't seem to be an issue any more.

Maksutov
2005-May-26, 09:22 AM
My landline is a deal with my pc cable (Telewest) but I have been wondering whether to change it and go mobile only. I think mobiles have become much more acceptable and 'respectable' now and connectivity in the UK at least doesn't seem to be an issue any more.
I'd say, no problem, as long as you, as a popular bumper sticker around here says, "Hang Up and Drive!"

Lianachan
2005-May-26, 09:25 AM
We have the cool "Please turn off your phone" adverts in movies and spot fines for phone driving are very strict.

A few weeks ago I was driving along the A9, and I passed a police car that was partially hidden in the driveway for a hotel. I was doing a touch over the speed limit, not much, so was a bit surprised when it pulled out behind me. It tailed me for about 5 miles, and then pulled me over. I was expecting to have to explain to the officer that I'd just completed an overtaking maneuover when I passed him (which was true, as it happens) and was allowing my car to bleed away speed rather than brake in the slippery conditions (which was not quite as true, as it happens, although it was raining). However, I was extremely surprised to find the conversation going like this:

Me: Good afternoon.
Policeman A: The reason why we've pulled you over is that when you passed us you were using your mobile phone.
Me: Umm - what? No I wasn't.
Policeman A: Yes you were.
Me: No. I wasn't.
Policeman A: Well, you were holding it up to your face.
Me: Umm - what? No I wasn't.
Policeman A: Yes you were.
Me: I used my phone briefly when stopped at a red light for road works about 5 miles south of where I passed you, and I've not used it since then. Do you know the exact time I passed you?
Policeman A: Yes
Me: Would you like to see the call histories?
Policeman A (very smugly): Well, if you're happy for us to do that sir! (obviously thinks I've handed him the rope with which he can hang me)
Me (showing him on my phone): See? Last call made 14:05, that's a few minutes before I would have passed you. See - call duration 20 seconds, so I wasn't still on that call when I passed you.
Policeman A takes the phone off me, and looks at the received calls (fair enough, since he thinks he's seen me comitting an offence). The last received call was just after 12:30.
Policeman A then hands me back the phone and says: You should consider getting a hands free kit.
Then Policeman A and Policeman B (who'd spent time inspecting my car for other things he could do me for, then standing behind his colleague with his arms folded, staring at me) get in their car and drive off.

No initial greeting, and no goodbye - let alone an apology. I've no idea what he actually saw me doing - scratching the side of my face at the very worst. My father was in the police, although he was a bit special in being a special instructor for armed police and an occasional bodyguard for visiting members of the Royal family, so I'm pretty well acquainted with several police officers (not this pair, sadly) and know about their work and suchlike - I had a lot of respect for them and their jobs. But - if my experience with them is typical, then it's no sodding wonder nobody gives them any respect anymore. Grrr.

Sorry about the extremely tangental and irrelevant rant.

frogesque
2005-May-26, 09:32 AM
Yep, we have spot fines for talk and drive in the UK (though it's widely abused) Glom? I think already mentioned this and I don't like the distraction, even with hands free, so anytime I drive and have the mobile with me it's switched off. If the call's important they can leave a message and I'll get back when safe to do so.

captain swoop
2005-May-26, 09:33 AM
What they usualy do is kick your rear light in and get you for that.

mopc
2005-May-26, 11:54 PM
I just got a ticket for that! Yep, here in Brazil too.

Captain Kidd
2005-May-27, 12:04 AM
They kicked in your tail light? :o



:D :D :D

They need to start ticketing for talking on phones for driving here. Yeah, I'd have gotten one, but I try not to talk too often. If I do, I usually get over in the slow(er) lane and don't try anything wild.

captain swoop
2005-May-27, 08:24 AM
I use a hands free thing. It's a little amplifier and speaker that plugs into the cigarette lighter. It has a wire with a tiny mike on the end that fits over the speaker on the phone. Works a treat, cost 5

frogesque
2005-May-27, 09:07 AM
I use a hands free thing. It's a little amplifier and speaker that plugs into the cigarette lighter. It has a wire with a tiny mike on the end that fits over the speaker on the phone. Works a treat, cost 5

But is it truely 'hands free'? Don't you still need to find the phone, and press buttons to answer a call and hang up afterwards? I just don't think it's advisable to be distracted at a crucial point like appraching a 6 section, 3 lane roundabout interchange. Isn't that what voicemail or text is for? You're buisy or unavailable and the caller can leave a message.

My personal mobile horror story is a bit of a sterotype but it actually happend. I'm driving along minding my own space on the road and a lady (yes, she was driving a designer 'off road') came toward me with kid, un-belted, in the passenger seat. Said lady had a mobile in one hand and was smoothing the kid's hair with the other while riding the crown of the road. So I flash my lights and blare the horn as I nearly end up in a ditch to avoid a head on and I get glared at for having the temerity to be on the road.

farmerjumperdon
2005-May-27, 12:14 PM
Using the telephone while driving should be strictly illegal, with a relatively nasty fine to really discourage violators. I'd say the same as going more than 15 over the limit (which where I live would be about $150). As someone stated earlier, at least the simple majority of the time I see someone do something dangerous, they've got the phone to their ear.

Here's an end-of-the-world for you though. I'm playing ball the other evening, and I look out in center field and the person is on the phone! What the heck happened that suddenly made it so bloody important to always be reachable? To me it is a subset of the I-want-it-perfect-yesterday-and-free attitude. Greed appears to be a dominant genetic flaw.

captain swoop
2005-May-27, 01:15 PM
But is it truely 'hands free'? Don't you still need to find the phone, and press buttons to answer a call and hang up afterwards? .

Well, the phone sits in a holster on the Dash next to the wheel. I press one button to answer and I don't need to hang up if they are calling me.

It's far less distracting than a Satnav screen or the CD changer.

Argos
2005-May-27, 01:53 PM
Seeing people talking alone on the streets with their micro-earsets is what disturbs me in this cell phone frenzy. They talk and talk, just to fill their inner emptiness...

scotsman
2005-May-27, 02:20 PM
(rant mode on)

Am I out of step with the universe ... :o , no mobile Phone at all, let alone alone one of the PDA/Cameras "toys" that seem to be available in what seems every second shop here in the UK....

I have no need for one, I don't want one , and as far as I'm concerned the whole tecnology could just vanish off the face of the earth :D

Odd since I'm an IT support team member ,, but if someone wants to call me , I have a phone at home, with an answermachine on the end of it.. and that's it!

Long may it continue-- 20 a month Pagh..... I've got better things to do with my money!

(end rant mode now!)

Melusine
2005-May-27, 02:21 PM
Cell phones are useful, especially for finding people in airports or driving long distances alone. My land line is always busy, but I ignore cell phone calls, too. However, it drives me crazy when:

1. Someone answers their cell and continues talking at my desk (solution: I start reading the Internet until they're done and ignore them).
2. The noise it produces; a co-worker had the James Bond theme going--and loud--plus people just have so many whacky tones, so there's just more noise.
3. People who answer their phones during horror movies (I am militant about noise in theaters).
4. Already bad drivers talking on cells in behemoth vehicles.
5. People who call me from areas where they know as they keep driving they will lose me or just bad connections.
6. People who leave longggggg messages on my cell, thus eating up my low minute allowance for week days.

Argos wrote: Seeing people talking alone on the streets with their micro-earsets is what disturbs me in this cell phone frenzy. They talk and talk, just to fill their inner emptiness...

I just think they look like better dressed homeless schizophrenics on city streets.

pumpkinpie
2005-May-27, 03:10 PM
But is it truely 'hands free'? Don't you still need to find the phone, and press buttons to answer a call and hang up afterwards?

My headset is set up so that if it's plugged in, it answers automatically. So I just plug it in before I start driving and put the earpiece on. If anyone calls, I don't have to press a button, I just wait for my phone to answer. And then when the other person hangs up, your phone hangs up too. No buttons necessary! That doesn't help you to make a call. Unless you have voice activated calling, which I'm still trying to figure out with the headset!

Captain Kidd
2005-May-27, 04:14 PM
I think there's been some studies done that say that headsets are just as bad as holding the phone to your ear. You're still concentrating on the conversation and slowing reaction time, you just have an extra hand free to wave around in a panic right before the crash.

Now where did I read that...

One thing I really appreciate about having these things (mine's a basic model by the way, no camera, just a phone) are for times when I'm at the store getting something and my wife remembers something else she needs or they're out and I need to see if she wants an alternative or skip it.

They make travelling in groups (of vehicles) so much easier. No worrying about keeping everybody in sight. And if the person in the rear suddenly gets the urge from too much fluids, you don't have to do the insane lights flashing or flying at well above the speed limit to get in front of the lead vehicle to take the next exit. (Been there, done that, almost got the ticket.)

They have their uses, they also don't. Walkie talkie phones so that I get to hear both ends of the conversation? The person who came up with that particular bright idea needs to be drug out into the street and shot.

Gillianren
2005-May-27, 06:41 PM
actually, I'd rather people just use walkie-talkies in keeping-together situations. aren't they cheaper anyway? (and no, I don't mean the phones, I mean the actual get-them-at-Target-for-$10 walkie-talkies.)

yes, EvilBob, you can join. maybe you can think of a better name, one with a mellifluous acronym!

ktesibios
2005-May-28, 04:12 AM
My experience of driving with passengers has convinced me that those "DO NOT TALK TO OPERATOR" signs you see in buses are there for a very good reason. I'm inclined to think that talking on a hands-free headset would be equally distracting.

My way of dealing with the phone when I'm in the car is not to touch the @#$%^& thing at all. After all. I'm paying for voicemail service as part of the package, so why not use it?

The only thing I use my landline for nowadays is dial-up Internet access. I figure that anyone who I would actually want to talk to has my cell number. For driving purposes, I figure that anyone who doesn't have the patience to leave a message and let me get back to them when it's safe to do so isn't someone I want to talk to.

I long ago noticed that anytime I had to jam on my brakes or take evasive action to avoid colliding with someone who was driving stupidly that someone would generally have a cell phone glued to their ear as they went by.

The other day I was driving on Burbank Boulevard when I encountered two teenagers riding bikes in the opposite direction. As they went by I noticed that one was riding one-handed while holding a cell phone to her ear.

Now I know that civilization is doomed. :wink:

Maksutov
2005-May-28, 04:26 AM
Kind of ironic that when one clicks on one of the ads at the bottom of this thread, the following appears:

http://img219.echo.cx/img219/5444/safehome7iv.th.jpg (http://img219.echo.cx/my.php?image=safehome7iv.jpg)

Among their "safe" products can be found mobile phone adapters. :-?

SeanF
2005-May-29, 12:43 AM
My experience of driving with passengers has convinced me that those "DO NOT TALK TO OPERATOR" signs you see in buses are there for a very good reason. I'm inclined to think that talking on a hands-free headset would be equally distracting.
Your inclincation is correct (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/01/030129080944.htm).

Actually, a while back I saw Ellen Degeneres doing a stand-up routine where she was talking about hands-free phones. She said, "If you're doing something that requires both your hands, I'm thinking your brain should be involved, too."

She's right.

tmosher
2005-May-29, 03:02 AM
I did a little trek today in the rain from Garland to Arlington, Texas (around fifty miles one-way).

Even though rain tends to make drivers in the DFW area act stupid - combine that with cell phones and you get complete brain lock.

Now...if you really want to hear me rant, combine an SUV with a cell phone and you get complete and utter stupidity. More than once I've almost been killed on my motorcycle by an inattentive SUV driver who was gabbing on the phone. Please explain to me what's so damn important that someone needs to be gabbing on the phone while doing over 65 mph on a crowded highway? Will their life suddenly come to an end if they are not in constant touch with the world?

Have anyone of you noticed that it's quite easy to recognize the idiot on the phone while driving? Just look for the car that's moving slower than the rest of traffic.

Gillianren
2005-May-29, 10:19 PM
not around here, they're not. and isn't that almost scarier?