PDA

View Full Version : Out of MIT: "tsunami-safe(r) house"---US$1500



sarongsong
2005-May-30, 06:42 AM
http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/j/msnbc/Components/Photos/050526/tsunami-house.hmedium.jpg (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7997103/)

Melusine
2005-May-30, 07:36 AM
I'm failing to see what's safe about that. If there are no holes for water to come up through that deck area, then it looks like water would just come up under it and float it away. That's why in Florida, people rip up the decks at restaurants before a hurricane. What am I missing here?

Edit: Oh, this must be a joke and I'm not getting it. #-o

sarongsong
2005-May-30, 07:48 AM
...What am I missing here?...Reading the link? :P

Maksutov
2005-May-30, 08:58 AM
Using the same type of materials typically used in the construction of traditional Sri Lankan homes, the more robust structures consist of four reinforced concrete pillars supporting a tin or tile roof.

The open design is stronger, Ratti said, because it would not block the flow of water were another tsunami to hit.

“Four small cores are stronger than a big one,” he said.
So the house remains and the people get washed away? This guy must be a civil engineer! Or at least a former member of ACE. :wink:

mickal555
2005-May-30, 10:34 AM
That's wht I was thinking- but what else can you do? I mean if its ripped apart people get hit by debries and are injured/death and the remaider have a ripped up house. People can relocate faster than houses to- what i'm trying to say is how can you make a house that would save the people?

Melusine
2005-May-30, 05:58 PM
...What am I missing here?...Reading the link? :P
Doh, I didn't even think to click on the picture--hey it was 2:40 am (excuses, excuses). It's still a bad design, though. The tsunami showed what kinds of buildings would survive. Dum de dum dum....

Yup, still a joke. 8)

publiusr
2005-Jun-08, 07:26 PM
The only Tsunami-safe homes are in Denver--too high for even asteroid impacts to splash water over--we hope.

sarongsong
2005-Jun-08, 09:14 PM
Then there's the Space House (http://www.spacedaily.com/news/materials-04zzb.html):
http://www.spacedaily.com/images/spacehouse-neumayer3-bg.jpg

Melusine
2005-Jun-26, 11:59 PM
OK, so they can't design a good tsunami-proof house, but they can create matter. Sure, I understand this. #-o


MIT physicists create new form of matter

SNIP

The team observed fermionic superfluidity in the lithium-6 isotope comprising three protons, three neutrons and three electrons. Since the total number of constituents is odd, lithium-6 is a fermion. Using laser and evaporative cooling techniques, they cooled the gas close to absolute zero. They then trapped the gas in the focus of an infrared laser beam; the electric and magnetic fields of the infrared light held the atoms in place. The last step was to spin a green laser beam around the gas to set it into rotation. A shadow picture of the cloud showed its superfluid behavior: The cloud was pierced by a regular array of vortices, each about the same size.

The superfluid Fermi gas created at MIT can also serve as an easily controllable model system to study properties of much denser forms of fermionic matter such as solid superconductors, neutron stars or the quark-gluon plasma that existed in the early universe.

Full article:
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2005/matter.html

Raptor1967
2005-Jun-27, 12:10 AM
Just build your house underground with sealable doors and windows.

NP :)

W.F. Tomba
2005-Jun-27, 06:47 PM
...What am I missing here?...Reading the link? :P
Doh, I didn't even think to click on the picture--hey it was 2:40 am (excuses, excuses). It's still a bad design, though. The tsunami showed what kinds of buildings would survive. Dum de dum dum....

Yup, still a joke. 8)
It's not supposed to be a tsunami-proof house, just an improvement on existing construction methods. It remains to be seen whether five times stronger is strong enough, but I don't see how you conclude that it's a bad design.

Melusine
2005-Jun-27, 08:15 PM
...What am I missing here?...Reading the link? :P
Doh, I didn't even think to click on the picture--hey it was 2:40 am (excuses, excuses). It's still a bad design, though. The tsunami showed what kinds of buildings would survive. Dum de dum dum....

Yup, still a joke. 8)
It's not supposed to be a tsunami-proof house, just an improvement on existing construction methods. It remains to be seen whether five times stronger is strong enough, but I don't see how you conclude that it's a bad design.
There's not much to go on from that article, but as I said the first time around, the deck doesn't look like a solid material--it looks like wood, and the water would come up underneath it and destroy it. There's no height to it, and the people who were on second floors of hotels and such were OK. The article doesn't say what the walls are made of, only the cement pillars and tile or tin roof. Even in monsoon areas in Pacific regions, houses are built on stilts. I realize cost is a factor. But as Mak said, with those screens and the middle breeze-way, it seems that people would wash away, unless they get on the roof.

It was just my first impression, and it doesn't look like anything I'd want to hang around in during a tsunami, though if people were properly warned they could go to higher ground, and at least come back to a standing house...maybe. It's obviously better than what they had, true. :)

Swift
2005-Jun-27, 08:50 PM
I checked out the link in the article to the MIT site; there was nothing there about this project. However, the link to the foundation that is funding the work (http://www.prajnopaya.org/) had a link back into the MIT stuff that had a lot of information MIT site (http://senseable.mit.edu/tsunami-prajnopaya/).
I have to admit I still don't quite understand the structural engineering.

Sammy
2005-Jun-28, 07:18 PM
http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/j/msnbc/Components/Photos/050526/tsunami-house.hmedium.jpg (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7997103/)

The way real estate is going in the metro DC area, that place would cost about $450K!