PDA

View Full Version : UK Tax Freedom Day



Heid the Ba'
2005-Jun-01, 02:30 PM
According to this report (http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/tax-advice/article.html?in_article_id=400970&in_page_id=11) today is the day us workers stop paying for lazy soapdodging students and start working for ourselves. Of course it is also the day we stop paying for RoC's chemo. Sorry fella. :D

Glom
2005-Jun-01, 04:57 PM
Yeah, stupid students scrounging of us hard working people just to spend three years getting drunk. :^o

electromagneticpulse
2005-Jun-02, 01:36 AM
Possibly being a student myself in a years time, not going to happen BTW, I wouldn't want someone paying for my education. If someone never went to uni they shouldn't have to pay for me to go, well they shouldn't pay for an ever increasing amount of students going to uni and less jobs for them. For example there was an architect and a forensic scientist working the bakery in Morrisonís. I heard they had great job prospects, I could get 5 years advance on those chumps and less debt if Iíd gone there at 16.

Also the prospect of me never going to uni in my entire life would factor in my vote of 'over my dead body' for paying for students. 90% go because they are scared of working, its a simple fact. The NVQ's are great in job prospects now and you earn while training don't get in debt and you can train to become a plumber one of the highest paying jobs in the country. Einstein even said if he got another chance he'd have become a plumber! Tells you where the real brains are :D

Although three years drinking money couldn't hurt, I'm starting the DMSF (Drinking Myself Stupid Fund) please send all the money you can 8)

Lianachan
2005-Jun-02, 07:23 AM
According to this report (http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/tax-advice/article.html?in_article_id=400970&in_page_id=11) today is the day us workers stop paying for lazy soapdodging students and start working for ourselves. Of course it is also the day we stop paying for RoC's chemo. Sorry fella. :D

I can't stand students - I never could. I couldn't live with myself for years!

frogesque
2005-Jun-02, 08:14 AM
Actually, since the tax year starts in April we still have a way to go yet before we put a £ coin in our pocket. Truth is with VAT, Council Tax and all the other taxes levied we never really stop paying. But then if I fall down in the street I know someone will come along and pick me up and either whisk me off to hospital or to the local skip :lol:

enginelessjohn
2005-Jun-02, 08:27 AM
The point about subsidising education with state funds, is that once someone has a degree, they are liable to earn much more money, and in turn, pay more tax. As a direct result of my degree I probably earn around 30 to 40% more than I would from doing a trade. And I am certain that I have more than paid back the money spent on me as a student. (one of the last in the UK that actually got a grant...) I also like this myth that trades get paid a fortune. Take a look at this Guardian article (http://www.guardian.co.uk/guardian_jobs_and_money/story/0,,1493801,00.html) to see that while they don't earn peanuts, they aren't rolling in it either.... And would you want to spend your working day fixing someone's sewers?

In my wife's case, when she graduates (as a graphic designer) she'll probably earn as much as she did when she left her full time job as an admin assistant. The difference is that now she is at the same money but on a starting salary. Sure there are people who do degrees and end up working in a supermarket, but that really is the exception rather than the rule.

Cheers
John

<Edited for grammar>

mid
2005-Jun-02, 10:42 AM
As one of the most popular reasons for graduates earning a pittance is that they're in the public sector, and so are somehow are supposed to be eternally grateful that they're paid at all for doing something so "rewarding", in theory the rest of us are gaining anyway.

Fram
2005-Jun-02, 10:53 AM
students. 90% go because they are scared of working, its a simple fact.

Saying it is a fact doesn't make it so. Many students have one or two jobs to pay for their studies (the part not payed by your taxes), and study hard next to it. It looks like they have loads of time because they don't have a family, a house, ... to spend their time on and so beyond working, studying and gong to lessons, they still have time left, but that doesn't mean they are scared of working, or that that is their primary reason to go studying.
Of course there are students who just go to university to have a year-long party, but the majority of students at university are there because they are interested in science and/or want to have a job in a field they like or they suppose wil earn them a lot of money.

electromagneticpulse
2005-Jun-02, 12:04 PM
students. 90% go because they are scared of working, its a simple fact.

Saying it is a fact doesn't make it so. Many students have one or two jobs to pay for their studies (the part not payed by your taxes), and study hard next to it. It looks like they have loads of time because they don't have a family, a house, ... to spend their time on and so beyond working, studying and gong to lessons, they still have time left, but that doesn't mean they are scared of working, or that that is their primary reason to go studying.
Of course there are students who just go to university to have a year-long party, but the majority of students at university are there because they are interested in science and/or want to have a job in a field they like or they suppose wil earn them a lot of money.

Well the local supermarkets have amazing qualifications. The forensic scientist is now living in the US where he could actually get a job and thereís another one going to Canada and has a 1 year placement over there, along with a lot of their classes going elsewhere in the world because none can get jobs over here. The architect I knew had a job in Scotland last time I talked to him, 3 years in debt working in Morrisonís almost had him going to therapy and did have him seeing a chiropractor.

The thing is 5 years work experience is becoming far more important than degrees because everyone has them and some of the best paying jobs don't even need degrees. I wouldn't mind having a degree; just I don't feel like 3-5 years to get something I don't need where I'm looking to go.

I just wanted to show that it isnít all roses that the government makes out all the time. People in my year group in school got told about NVQís every other school in the area didnít, everyone I know country wide didnít they had to go to college and be told. IIRC there are plumbers earning about 100 grand down near London and it keeps you in good shape and as we have it you can pick your jobs as a plumber.

Lianachan
2005-Jun-02, 12:58 PM
The thing is 5 years work experience is becoming far more important than degrees because everyone has them and some of the best paying jobs don't even need degrees.

Yup. None of my (pre-work obtained) educational qualifications have any bearing whatsoever on my current job, and were not a factor in my recruitment. I have obtained further - relevant - qualifications in my time here, but that would still be the case had I not gone into further education.

electromagneticpulse
2005-Jun-02, 02:52 PM
The thing is 5 years work experience is becoming far more important than degrees because everyone has them and some of the best paying jobs don't even need degrees.

Yup. None of my (pre-work obtained) educational qualifications have any bearing whatsoever on my current job, and were not a factor in my recruitment. I have obtained further - relevant - qualifications in my time here, but that would still be the case had I not gone into further education.

What job do you do? if you don't mind me asking.

I read an article by one of the ex editors for The List who said he had two piles for journalists query letters (what I'm looking to get into along with my writing), one was full of people who loved writing and the other went in the bin. To cut a long answer short he said most qualified journalists never entered the love writing pile and ended up in the bin. He's completely unqualified and doesn't think its necessary, I love to write so hopefully there's a job lurking for me out there. Good pay, fun to do and its relatively anonymous fame (for big timers) as no one will ever need to see my ugly mug... talking about my coffee mug there :D

Charlie in Dayton
2005-Jun-03, 03:33 AM
Waaaaaaaaaal, 'tweren't that long ago that I were a pore college student...with some scholarships, and student loans, and family assistance, and selling blood plasma twice a week (I'm rabid, y'know...), and a part-time job (full-time student, part-time job, no-time money), I got thru two years...the student loans were paid off a couple of years back, I'm paying off the family assistance regularly (that ledger still sez I got a couple years to go). But I remember the first year as an independent contractor that I had to figure out ALL my taxes...I were amazed. The first full year of employment, I paid more in taxes than I made in either of the two years I was in school...

So the idea of paying back more in taxes after public support of higher education has some merit, according to yr obdt svt...

Heid the Ba'
2005-Jun-03, 11:26 AM
Despite the OP I don't mind my taxes paying for education, I did spend 7 years at uni after all.

emp: Be wary of believing what plumbers etc. say they earn, I'll believe some of the figures when I see evidence of it. Same goes for taxi drivers, Edinburgh's are always telling you what they make, but they live in 1970s boxes on out of town estates and drive Mondeos.

For every Alan Sugar who left school with no qualifications and runs a major company there are 100 traditionally educated Fred Goodwins (http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/04_23/b3886191.htm)and 100 uneducated Big Issue sellers.

(Uneducated in the sense of not having formal qualifications, no reflection of intelligence)

electromagneticpulse
2005-Jun-03, 02:25 PM
emp: Be wary of believing what plumbers etc. say they earn, I'll believe some of the figures when I see evidence of it. Same goes for taxi drivers, Edinburgh's are always telling you what they make, but they live in 1970s boxes on out of town estates and drive Mondeos.

For every Alan Sugar who left school with no qualifications and runs a major company there are 100 traditionally educated Fred Goodwins (http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/04_23/b3886191.htm)and 100 uneducated Big Issue sellers.

Well I've seen the jobs for one of the local plumbers who works in all the houses worth over a million, he was contracted for the entire plumbing for one of the local hairdressers new spa salons, which is a huge building and was worth 5 million IIRC when he bought it. Some of the plumbers are thick as two short planks and arenít all that nice so probably donít earn much.

I don't like formal qualifications because some people with them need their heads deflating. Just because someone has a PhD doesnít mean their intelligent and vice versa. I mean look at all the PhD nut jobs that release those Ďtheory of everythingí books that should be sold with a manual on how to tie the perfect noose, because when you finish reading youíll need it.

Also the most intelligent of people can be the dumbest people in life. There are also different types of intelligence and it doesnít take a slip of paper to get someone a job when theyíre good at their job.

My dad is a freelance computer programmer earning around £50,000 a year (in that one job alone) and is the only contracted employee in KC who they trained, as he could up and leave and earn more money elsewhere. To say he used to be a milkman not even earning £5,000 heís done well for being expelled from school.

I just want to point out paper doesnít make anybody smart it can only make them big headed. People who are intelligent will have it with or without the paper.
(Not saying everyone with a piece of paper is big headed, 'cause damn I have a book full mine would have popped!)

TriangleMan
2005-Jun-03, 03:10 PM
I don't like formal qualifications because some people with them need their heads deflating.
I ususally refer to this phenomenon as "degree-pride". Someone gets a degree and feel that certain things are beneath them to do. It is fine to have some pride in your accomplishments to some extent but when they go to extremes like demanding that someone else should be getting them their cup of coffee in the morning they get on my bad side pretty quickly.

I've spoken to tax collectors who've told me that doctors and lawyers are usually pretty annoying to deal with. One collector said the problem was that "they just assume that since they graduated with this great degree they can do whatever they want, including paying taxes according to their schedule and that us collectors, since we don't have big degrees, don't have a clue about the tax code".

electromagneticpulse
2005-Jun-03, 03:49 PM
Hey "degree-pride" sounds good. I've met a lot of doctors (and so has my mum) who are like that, like thereís a girl in the news now who went to her GP saying she thinks she's got breast cancer and she's only 17. She was told she couldn't have because she's too young and its 1 in 15000 odds for her age. That sounds retarded to me, turning her away because of 1 in 15000 odds is extremely high in a population of 60.4 million (July 05). Thatís about 4000 people and you're going to know your body better than a doctor any day no matter how big their head is.

I can't stand the coffee syndrome though. If they have a broken leg or get me coffee I'll do it, else I want to break their leg so they've got a right to ask. If anyone hasn't noticed, I hate big headed people 8)

Gillianren
2005-Jun-03, 05:57 PM
I'm curious as to how you think life would be different if everyone with an advanced degree disappeared.