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ToSeek
2005-Jun-02, 04:24 PM
NASA Selects New Frontiers Concept Study: Juno Mission to Jupiter (http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=16990)


NASA today announced a mission to fly to Jupiter will proceed to a preliminary design phase. The mission is called Juno, and it is the second in NASA's New Frontiers Program.

The mission will conduct a first-time, in-depth study of the giant planet. This mission proposes to place a spacecraft in a polar orbit around Jupiter to investigate the existence of an ice-rock core; determine the amount of global water and ammonia present in the atmosphere; study convection and deep wind profiles in the atmosphere; investigate the origin of the Jovian magnetic field; and explore the polar magnetosphere.

aurora
2005-Jun-02, 06:58 PM
Yawn. Wake me up when we get to Europa!

8)

skwirlinator
2005-Jun-02, 07:03 PM
In the future this could be funded by a mining company for resource locating.
All we need is a mega-corporation to get behind the Idea.

Saturn Systems Inc
Corporation formed to mine Oxygen and Methane from the Saturn System

Jovian Systems Inc
Corporation to mine the water and ammonia from the Jovian System

Crazieman
2005-Jun-03, 12:31 AM
In the future this could be funded by a mining company for resource locating.
All we need is a mega-corporation to get behind the Idea.

Saturn Systems Inc
Corporation formed to mine Oxygen and Methane from the Saturn System

Jovian Systems Inc
Corporation to mine the water and ammonia from the Jovian System

Union Aerospace Corporation 8)

skwirlinator
2005-Jun-03, 12:37 AM
There you go then....(nods agreeingly)

Googled to this

http://www.ua-corp.com/

NEATO>>>>>>>>>> =D>



http://www.nlrb.gov/nlrb/shared_files/decisions/331/331-74.htm

Ilya
2005-Jun-03, 02:55 AM
NASA selected two proposed mission concepts for study in July 2004 from seven submitted in February 2004 in response to an agency Announcement of Opportunity. "This was a very tough decision given the exciting and innovative nature of the two missions," Asrar added."


Was the other concept selected in July 2004 "New Horizons 2" Uranus/KBO mission? Also, does anyone know what the other five proposals were?

ToSeek
2005-Jun-03, 04:12 PM
NASA selected two proposed mission concepts for study in July 2004 from seven submitted in February 2004 in response to an agency Announcement of Opportunity. "This was a very tough decision given the exciting and innovative nature of the two missions," Asrar added."


Was the other concept selected in July 2004 "New Horizons 2" Uranus/KBO mission?

No. This was the other one:


"Moonrise: Lunar South Pole-Aitken Basin Sample Return
Mission," Dr. Michael Duke Principal Investigator,
Colorado School of Mines, Boulder. This investigation
proposes to land two identical landers on the surface
near the moon's south pole and to return over two
kilograms (about five pounds) of lunar materials from a
region of the moon's surface believed to harbor
materials from the moon's mantle.

So far I haven't found anything that describes the other five.

ToSeek
2005-Jun-06, 04:12 PM
More information:

NASA's newest mission: Orbiting the king of planets (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n0506/05juno/)


For the next bold step to robotically explore the solar system, NASA has chosen a heavily instrumented probe to orbit Jupiter's poles over an ambitious mission to return samples from the Moon's mysterious south pole.

The Juno mission, as it is known, will launch by mid-2010 to begin its journey to Jupiter to conduct in-depth studies of the gas giant's extensive magnetic field, thick atmosphere, and the potential of a dense rocky core. Juno will help scientists build upon earlier findings from NASA's Galileo probe to determine how giant planets form and operate.

ToSeek
2005-Jun-09, 04:24 PM
And even more:

Juno Mission to Jupiter (http://www.astrobio.net/news/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid= 1596&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0)


"The Juno UVS will provide Hubble-like images of Jupiter's powerful and dynamic aurora, but from the much better vantage points of directly above the north and south poles," says Dr. G. Randall Gladstone, an Institute scientist at SwRI who serves as the UVS principal investigator.

CJSF
2005-Jun-09, 06:05 PM
Well, I'm sure it will be cool and all.. but why not a mission to Neptune or Uranus? We've alread HAD an orbiter mission to Jupiter.

CJSF

Graham2001
2005-Jun-10, 12:57 AM
Well, I'm sure it will be cool and all.. but why not a mission to Neptune or Uranus...

CJSF

Orbital mechanics make it easier (& thus cheaper) to send probes to Jupiter than to send them to Uranus/Neptune.

Also Galileo was handicapped by the damaged main antenna, the chance to 'make up' for that is not to be sniffed at.

Karl
2005-Jun-14, 09:33 PM
Well, I'm sure it will be cool and all.. but why not a mission to Neptune or Uranus? We've alread HAD an orbiter mission to Jupiter.

CJSF

The $700 million cost cap would make it tough to get to Neptune or Uranus with enough instrumentation to make it competitive. Juno will be the first Jupiter mission with solar arrays which cuts out a lot of cost related to RTGs.

Juno provides a lot of instrumentation and will get very high resolution views of the interior structure of Jupiter via microwave sounding, gravity, and magnetometer measurements.

Basically Juno was the most bang for the buck, and it had a very low risk profile.

CJSF
2005-Jun-14, 09:47 PM
Jupiter mission with solar arrays which cuts out a lot of cost related to RTGs.


:-k Just how much bang for you buck can you get with solar arrays at Jupiter? I thought they were all but useless beyond the asteroid belt region.

CJSF

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Jun-14, 09:53 PM
Well, I suppose that it just depends on how big you make them.

CJSF
2005-Jun-14, 10:09 PM
[waiting for publiusr's HLV comment]
...wait for it...

CJSF

ToSeek
2005-Jun-14, 10:09 PM
Well, I suppose that it just depends on how big you make them.

This big. (http://www.swri.edu/press/2005/Juno.htm)

NEAR Shoemaker was the first spacecraft to use solar arrays past the orbit of Mars.

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Jun-14, 10:15 PM
But there's no size reference in that picture. The panels could be 5 cm long, or 5 km.

I will trust that NASA knows what it's doing, though. :)

CJSF
2005-Jun-14, 11:04 PM
I think it will make it the anit-space-nuke crowd say "See! You don't NEED to risk unholy plutonium rain on us!"

CJSF

madamwitty
2005-Jun-15, 01:35 PM
But there's no size reference in that picture. The panels could be 5 cm long, or 5 km.

Jusdging by the size of the antenna in the picture (which I'm guessing would be on the order of 3 - 5 m, the solar arrays look to have a surface area on the order of 75 - 150 m^2. That's purely a guess, but it seems pretty big! I suppose I could probably Google up the real size if I had time.

Of course, it would be best to have some explicit scale markers to be sure :-)

Karl
2005-Jun-15, 03:39 PM
Jusdging by the size of the antenna in the picture (which I'm guessing would be on the order of 3 - 5 m, the solar arrays look to have a surface area on the order of 75 - 150 m^2.

Less than 50^2, but the cells are not silicon, so the efficiency is higher.

ToSeek
2005-Jul-27, 04:27 PM
Schedule slipping already (http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=17489)


NASA/MSFC has a requirement for a study to determine the impact to the Juno Mission's science results, mission design (including delta v requirements), mission operations, parts availability, staff availability, test facility availability, staff availability, test facility availability, DSN availability, technical and programmatic risks, and life cycle costs as a result of slipping the launch to 2010 and 2011.

Mr. Milton Banana
2005-Jul-27, 04:39 PM
Yawn. Wake me up when we get to Europa!

8)

Yawn??? Hardly. :P

The convection studies alone fascinate me. Jupiter has the second most violent thunderstorms in the solar system-second to Saturn. And at the poles, there appears to be quite a bit of convection, too.

Jupiter's lightning is 1,000 times more powerful than Earth's. (Saturn's lightning is the strongest, apparently: 1 million times stronger than Earth's lightning.)

It would be nice if we could get closer studies of Jovian thunderstorms through Juno.

8)

publiusr
2005-Jul-27, 08:27 PM
[waiting for publiusr's HLV comment]
...wait for it...

CJSF

I'm too busy scratching my head over solar panels--although they have gotten so much better.

This might wind up being a Delta IV mission as opposed to Delta II.

I would still axe it--for the time being. We just had Galileo.

I would go for one Kuiper/Pluto mission then call it quits.

Let's do something new for a change.

Doodler
2005-Jul-27, 08:34 PM
[waiting for publiusr's HLV comment]
...wait for it...

CJSF

[sets himself up in ambush position]

Really, I can't complain about the nature of this one. We've got a battallion of Jovian style planets discovered now, and the only real way to figure them out is to get up close and dissect the one true giant we can get to.

Plus if we're going to be putting long term probes on moons around this behemoth, it would be nice to really know the monster we face.

Comparing JUNO to Galileo is like trying to compare SOHO to Voyager. One's just exploring the neighborhood, the other is intense surveilling the big house in the middle of the block.

Ilya
2005-Jul-27, 08:45 PM
I would still axe it--for the time being. We just had Galileo.

Galileo was not really a mission to Jupiter -- it was a mission to Jupiter's moons. JUNO would be a mission to explore the giant planet itself.

publiusr
2005-Jul-27, 09:04 PM
Even so--that planet--like Mars--had has spacecraft. Pluto hasn't.

Karl
2005-Jul-28, 06:28 PM
Not till 2015.

http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/new_horizons_zoom_pluto.html

Some of the Juno instruments are copies of the New Horizons instruments.

publiusr
2005-Jul-28, 06:34 PM
More on that:
http://images.spaceref.com/news/2002/new.horizons.plans.Rev_12.pdf
Dated.

ToSeek
2007-Mar-12, 03:15 PM
Juno Gets A Little Bigger With One More Payload For Jovian Delivery (http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Juno_Gets_A_Little_Bigger_With_One_More_Payload_Fo r_Jovian_Delivery_999.html)


NASA has now officially permitted the science team of the "Juno" Jupiter orbiter -- scheduled to fly in August 2011 -- to add another experiment, provided by the Italian Space Agency, to the craft, which already carries eight American experiments.

Worth reading - includes a discussion of all the onboard instruments.

Launch window
2007-Mar-13, 09:54 PM
Even so--that planet--like Mars--had has spacecraft. Pluto hasn't.

I don't think Pluto is a planet

Doodler
2007-Mar-13, 10:07 PM
I don't think Pluto is a planet

:mad: Them's fightin' words. ;) But then Ceres and Vesta are due for a flyby, so I guess it balances itself out in the end. Personally, what its classified as is less important than understand what exactly it is.

JonClarke
2007-Mar-14, 07:50 AM
:-k Just how much bang for you buck can you get with solar arrays at Jupiter? I thought they were all but useless beyond the asteroid belt region.CJSF

It all depends on how efficient your spacecraft and solar cells are.

As I understand it solar irradiance at Jupiter is 50 w/m2.

If we use New Horizons as a baseline, the spacecraft will need 200 w of power

The currently most efficient solar cells (MRO) have an efficiency of 25%

On this basis Juno will need a solar panel area of 200 / 50 X 4 = 16 m2. Allowing 25% margin for cell degradation brings it up to 20 m2, quite a reasonable figure.

Jon

Cugel
2007-Mar-14, 10:54 AM
It is actually something like 50 m2.
As can be seen here: http://juno.wisc.edu/spacecraft.html

quote: "The Juno spacecraft uses three, ~2 m x 9 m solar panels"

V-GER
2007-Mar-14, 01:32 PM
I would have liked to seen them drop a probe inside the atmosphere that took pictures as well. But if this answers the questions about Jupiter's core, I'm satisfied.

Doodler
2007-Mar-14, 02:22 PM
I would have liked to seen them drop a probe inside the atmosphere that took pictures as well. But if this answers the questions about Jupiter's core, I'm satisfied.

We'd be lucky to get anything other than pictures of big gray swaths. Color pictures are too much information to transmit rapidly on a probe who's lifespan will be measured in minutes, through an EXTREMELY radioactive environment. See, the ugly side of all those nice pretty colorful clouds is a certain amount of opacity. Looks gorgeous from a million kilometers away, looks like industrial strength pea soup London Fog from point blank range.

CJSF
2007-Mar-14, 07:34 PM
It all depends on how efficient your spacecraft and solar cells are.

As I understand it solar irradiance at Jupiter is 50 w/m2.

If we use New Horizons as a baseline, the spacecraft will need 200 w of power

The currently most efficient solar cells (MRO) have an efficiency of 25%

On this basis Juno will need a solar panel area of 200 / 50 X 4 = 16 m2. Allowing 25% margin for cell degradation brings it up to 20 m2, quite a reasonable figure.

Jon

Wow.. a response almost 2 years after my post! So in reality, the panels will be large, but not impossibly so?

CJSF

JonClarke
2007-Mar-15, 08:05 AM
It is actually something like 50 m2.
As can be seen here: http://juno.wisc.edu/spacecraft.html

quote: "The Juno spacecraft uses three, ~2 m x 9 m solar panels"

Thanks, I not been able to find an exact measurment.

That is a very large compared to my calculation. What are we to make of this? I can see three possibilities:

1) They are using low efficiency solar cells (10%). I can't see why they would do this.

2) They are assuming very high degradation of cell efficiency over the life of the mission and thus a very high margin (still, 275% margin seems excessive).

3) Juno using much more power that NH, more like Galileo requirements (500 watts, which would need 50 m2 with a 25% margin).

4) Some combination of 2 & 3 (for example roughly 300 w and 100% margin or 400 w and 50% margin)

ToSeek
2007-Mar-15, 12:07 PM
There's a good writeup on the mission at this site (http://hdl.handle.net/2014/37654), but it still doesn't explain the massive solar panels. What effect would Jupiter's magnetic field have on the solar cells? There might be a higher level of degradation expected than usual.

ToSeek
2007-Mar-15, 12:13 PM
Thanks, I not been able to find an exact measurment.

That is a very large compared to my calculation. What are we to make of this? I can see three possibilities:

1) They are using low efficiency solar cells (10%). I can't see why they would do this.

2) They are assuming very high degradation of cell efficiency over the life of the mission and thus a very high margin (still, 275% margin seems excessive).

3) Juno using much more power that NH, more like Galileo requirements (500 watts, which would need 50 m2 with a 25% margin).

4) Some combination of 2 & 3 (for example roughly 300 w and 100% margin or 400 w and 50% margin)

The good folks at UMSF come up with the same results (http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=2548&st=60#) (and the same comparison with Galileo).

V-GER
2007-Mar-15, 03:15 PM
We'd be lucky to get anything other than pictures of big gray swaths. Color pictures are too much information to transmit rapidly on a probe who's lifespan will be measured in minutes, through an EXTREMELY radioactive environment. See, the ugly side of all those nice pretty colorful clouds is a certain amount of opacity. Looks gorgeous from a million kilometers away, looks like industrial strength pea soup London Fog from point blank range.

I get your point, not much to look at but in the end there wasn't much to look at in the surface photo of Titan but I still wanted to see it. Also, didn't the Galileo descender transmit data for over an hour? Sure there wouldn't probably be much to gain scientifically but it would generate interest. Naturally the probe should have other science instruments beside a camera.

Doodler
2007-Mar-15, 03:34 PM
I get your point, not much to look at but in the end there wasn't much to look at in the surface photo of Titan but I still wanted to see it. Also, didn't the Galileo descender transmit data for over an hour? Sure there wouldn't probably be much to gain scientifically but it would generate interest. Naturally the probe should have other science instruments beside a camera.

I dunno, I think we saw plenty from the surface of Titan. I'll look up how long the Galileo descender lasted, I thought it was somewhat less than that.

Added: "Somewhat less" ended up being about three minutes shy of an hour. http://www.solarviews.com/eng/galpr3.htm

V-GER
2007-Mar-16, 02:06 PM
Added: "Somewhat less" ended up being about three minutes shy of an hour. http://www.solarviews.com/eng/galpr3.htm

Ok thanks, for some reason I had the figure 90 minutes in my mind.

ToSeek
2007-Oct-12, 02:18 AM
NASA Chooses Rocket for Next Jupiter Probe (http://www.space.com/news/071011-juno-rocket.html)


NASA has chosen the rocket to launch its next robotic probe to Jupiter. An Atlas 5 model 551 rocket, provided by Lockheed Martin Commercial Launch Services, will send off NASA's $700 million Juno mission in August 2011, the space agency said.

"Getting the launch vehicle contract this early in the process is very helpful for us," said Scott Bolton, principal investigator for Juno's mission at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas. The early decision allows Bolton and other researchers more time to prepare Juno's science instruments for launch conditions.

The solar-powered Juno spacecraft is scheduled to arrive at Jupiter in 2016, where it will spend a year in polar orbit peering beneath the gas giant's clouds. Unlike spacecraft that have swiveling cameras to look around, Juno will spin in orbit so its outward-looking cameras get continual glimpses of the planet. That will allow its instruments to study Jupiter's interior, atmosphere, and polar magnetosphere.

ToSeek
2008-Oct-09, 10:54 PM
Juno Spacecraft to Study Jupiter (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/081009-am-juno-jupiter.html)


For generations, astronomers have argued over how the planets in our solar system were formed. Today, most theories assume that planets were formed in a nebula of gas and dust that condensed around what eventually became our sun, but there is still great disagreement over details, particularly for gas giant planets like Jupiter: Did a small core form first around which each planet condensed, or did instability in the nebula cause pockets to collapse directly into planets?

Eight years from now, if all goes as planned, a spacecraft will enter orbit around Jupiter that should provide insight into planet formation.

Juno, the first solar-powered mission to the outer planets (it will carry no nuclear materials), will be inserted into a polar orbit that will approach the gas giant world much more closely than any previous mission. It will carry several instruments intended to determine the structure of Jupiter's atmosphere.

ToSeek
2008-Nov-24, 10:08 PM
NASA press release:


NASA Prepares for New Juno Mission to Jupiter

WASHINGTON -- NASA is officially moving forward on a mission to conduct an unprecedented, in-depth study of Jupiter.

Called Juno, the mission will be the first in which a spacecraft is placed in a highly elliptical polar orbit around the giant planet to understand its formation, evolution and structure. Underneath its dense cloud cover, Jupiter safeguards secrets to the fundamental processes and conditions that governed our early solar system.

"Jupiter is the archetype of giant planets in our solar system and formed very early, capturing most of the material left after the sun formed," said Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "Unlike Earth, Jupiter's giant mass allowed it to hold onto its original composition, providing us with a way of tracing our solar system's history."

The spacecraft is scheduled to launch aboard an Atlas rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla., in August 2011, reaching Jupiter in 2016. The spacecraft will orbit Jupiter 32 times, skimming about 4,800 kilometers (3,000 miles) over the planet's cloud tops for approximately one year. The mission will be the first solar powered spacecraft designed to operate despite the great distance from the sun.

"Jupiter is more than 644 million kilometers (400 million miles) from the sun or five times further than Earth," Bolton said. "Juno is engineered to be extremely energy efficient."

The spacecraft will use a camera and nine science instruments to study the hidden world beneath Jupiter's colorful clouds. The suite of science instruments will investigate the existence of an ice-rock core, Jupiter's intense magnetic field, water and ammonia clouds in the deep atmosphere, and explore the planet's aurora borealis.

"In Greek and Roman mythology, Jupiter's wife Juno peered through Jupiter's veil of clouds to watch over her husband's mischief," said Professor Toby Owen, co-investigator at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu. "Our Juno looks through Jupiter's clouds to see what the planet is up to, not seeking signs of misbehavior, but searching for whispers of water, the ultimate essence of life."

Understanding the formation of Jupiter is essential to understanding the processes that led to the development of the rest of our solar system and what the conditions were that led to Earth and humankind. Similar to the sun, Jupiter is composed mostly of hydrogen and helium. A small percentage of the planet is composed of heavier elements. However, Jupiter has a larger percentage of these heavier elements than the sun.

"Juno's extraordinarily accurate determination of the gravity and magnetic fields of Jupiter will enable us to understand what is going on deep down in the planet," said Professor Dave Stevenson, co-investigator at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "These and other measurements will inform us about how Jupiter's constituents are distributed, how Jupiter formed and how it evolved, which is a central part of our growing understanding of the nature of our solar system."

Deep in Jupiter's atmosphere, under great pressure, hydrogen gas is squeezed into a fluid known as metallic hydrogen. At these great depths, the hydrogen acts like an electrically conducting metal which is believed to be the source of the planet's intense magnetic field. Jupiter also may have a rocky solid core at the center.

"Juno gives us a fantastic opportunity to get a picture of the structure of Jupiter in a way never before possible," said James Green, director of NASA's Planetary Division at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "It will allow us to take a giant step forward in our understanding on how giant planets form and the role that plays in putting the rest of the solar system together. "

The Juno mission is the second spacecraft designed under NASA's New Frontiers Program. The first was the Pluto New Horizons mission, launched in January 2006 and scheduled to reach Pluto's moon Charon in 2015. The program provides opportunities to carry out several medium-class missions identified as top priority objectives in the Decadal Solar System Exploration Survey, conducted by the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council in Washington.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Juno mission. Lockheed Martin of Denver is building the spacecraft. The Italian Space Agency is contributing an infrared spectrometer instrument and a portion of the radio science experiment.

For more information about the Juno mission, visit: http://juno.nasa.gov

timb
2008-Nov-24, 10:17 PM
searching for whispers of water, the ultimate essence of life, no tell us what it is really going there for. Why this ** innuendo that they are looking for life on Jupiter?

KaiYeves
2008-Nov-24, 10:17 PM
Once again you live up to your name, oh, ToSeek the Great.

ToSeek
2008-Nov-25, 02:56 PM
Once again you live up to your name, oh, ToSeek the Great.

This stuff is easy - I get it in an email!

marsbug
2008-Nov-26, 04:07 PM
searching for whispers of water, the ultimate essence of life, no tell us what it is really going there for. Why this ** innuendo that they are looking for life on Jupiter?

Actually as exagerrated as it is it's not entirely **. There is (according to models) a zone of jupiters atmosphere where the clouds are composed of water droplets (theorised to play an important role in its storms), and jupiter does have some fairly complex organics in its atmosphere.

If confirmed to exist the water cloud layer provides an environment where (fairly briefly due to atmospheric circulation, but on a vast scale) organic chemistry can happen at room temperatures with liquid water, and we can access it without drilling through kilometers of ice. It might actually be one of the most earth like environments we've found to date, thats relavant to understanding life surely?

timb
2008-Nov-30, 12:46 AM
Actually as exagerrated as it is it's not entirely **. There is (according to models) a zone of jupiters atmosphere where the clouds are composed of water droplets (theorised to play an important role in its storms), and jupiter does have some fairly complex organics in its atmosphere.

If confirmed to exist the water cloud layer provides an environment where (fairly briefly due to atmospheric circulation, but on a vast scale) organic chemistry can happen at room temperatures with liquid water... thats relavant to understanding life surely?

Uh, no. If there were life there that would be interesting, amazing even, and clearly our understanding of life would be incomplete if we did not study it, but, in the absence of life there, how is studying organic chemistry on Jupiter relevant to understanding life, other than "here's another example of organic chemistry happening without life"?

According to NASA, the primary scientific goal of the Juno mission is to significantly improve our understanding of the formation, evolution and structure of Jupiter. The rest of the mission goals (http://nasascience.nasa.gov/missions/juno) don't mention looking for life on Jupiter at all.

slang
2009-Sep-27, 09:59 PM
Spaceflight Now: Juno probe on target for 2011 departure to Jupiter (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n0909/24juno/)


Early construction work on the spacecraft's primary structure is already underway after the $700 million mission passed its critical design review in April, according to Jan Chodas, Juno's project manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

The next step will be building flight hardware for electronic components and Juno's eight science instruments.

"Our instruments are well along," Chodas said. "They've all got pretty mature engineering models and most, if not all, have started their flight builds."

[...]

NASA Headquarters also asked the Juno project to open their launch period a few days earlier, giving the probe more time to get off the ground in early August.

"The earlier that we launch in our launch period, the sooner it frees up that one Atlas pad to start MSL preparations," Chodas said.

To accommodate the change, Juno will now follow a trajectory that arrives at Jupiter a month earlier than originally planned.

ToSeek
2009-Sep-27, 10:45 PM
Hot dog, a NASA program that's ahead of schedule!

Romanus
2009-Sep-27, 11:16 PM
^
"You don't see that every day!"

[/end Master Tang voice] ;)

ToSeek
2010-May-06, 10:05 PM
Juno Taking Shape in Denver (http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.rss.html?pid=30759)


Assembly has begun on NASA's Juno spacecraft, which will help scientists understand the origin and evolution of Jupiter. The mission, whose principal investigator is Scott Bolton of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Tex., is expected to launch in August 2011 and reach Jupiter in 2016.

The assembly, testing and launch operations phase began April 1 in a high-bay clean room at Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver. Engineers and technicians will spend the next few months fitting instruments and navigation equipment onto the spacecraft.

KaiYeves
2010-May-07, 11:39 PM
Woah, that's quick!

slang
2011-Jul-30, 11:31 PM
(Yeah. 6 year old thread. Still going strong. ;) )

NASA Juno Webpage (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/main/index.html)
South West Research Institute Juno page (http://missionjuno.swri.edu/) (media heavy site, loads slowly)
Juno Launch Press Kit (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/press_kits/JunoLaunch.pdf)
Juno Wikipedia page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juno_%28spacecraft%29)
Spaceflight Now Mission Status Center (http://spaceflightnow.com/atlas/av029/status.html)
Spaceflight Now Ascent Timeline (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/atlas/av029/ascenttimeline.html)
ToSeek's Juno Launch thread (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/118555-ToSeek-ToKSC-ToTweet).

From the main Juno page:


Fri, 29 Jul 2011 04:52:40 PM GMT+0200

The Flight Readiness Review was completed this morning ahead of next week's launch of the Juno mission to Jupiter. The session went smoothly, ending with officials formally setting Aug. 5 as the liftoff date for the spacecraft on an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. NASA's Launch Services Program is overseeing the launch, while the mission is managed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

5 days, 16 hours until launch window opens.

MaDeR
2011-Jul-31, 06:38 PM
Now that is something for a change: mission that actually is ALMOST on schedule (2009, in reality 2011) and budget (700mln $, actually 1.1bln $). This is entirely acceptable. Miracle! Miracle!

slang
2011-Aug-04, 09:48 PM
About 18 hours (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/main/index.html) until launch.

Planetary Society blog: Fun for the whole family: Watch an enormous rocket blast a spacecraft to Jupiter! (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00003131/)


Here's some tips on how and where to watch, where to get further information, and a timeline for the planned launch events. The launch is scheduled for tomorrow at 11:39 Eastern time -- that's 15:39 UTC. The launch window is 69 minutes long. They are very motivated to get the spacecraft off the pad tomorrow because tropical storm Emily is on the way toward Florida and weather forecasts deteriorate toward the weekend.

slang
2011-Aug-05, 04:51 AM
10 hours and 45 minutes until the launch window opens.

ToSeek's Juno Launch thread (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/118555-ToSeek-ToKSC-ToTweet).

I'll probably be driving home from work at launch time, so if someone wants to steal and/or add to the link farm: go ahead.

Swift
2011-Aug-05, 01:04 PM
Launch Day for Juno
Fri, 05 Aug 2011 08:03:58 AM EDT

The countdown is moving ahead this morning toward a liftoff at 11:34 a.m. EDT to begin the Juno mission to Jupiter.

Two and 1/2 hours till launch.

bunker9603
2011-Aug-05, 02:54 PM
30 minutes until launch

Swift
2011-Aug-05, 03:25 PM
The "anomaly team" is discussing something about "charge cycles", whatever that all means. Working through some issues at T-4 minutes, spacecraft is still on external power, will not launch at opening of launch window at 11:34.

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 03:29 PM
Launch will be delayed by at least five minutes. Not going to switch spacecraft to internal power until charge cycle problem is resolved.

slang
2011-Aug-05, 03:31 PM
NASA Juno Webpage (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/main/index.html)
South West Research Institute Juno page (http://missionjuno.swri.edu/) (media heavy site, loads slowly)
Juno Launch Press Kit (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/press_kits/JunoLaunch.pdf)
Juno Wikipedia page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juno_%28spacecraft%29)
Spaceflight Now Mission Status Center (http://spaceflightnow.com/atlas/av029/status.html)
Spaceflight Now Ascent Timeline (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/atlas/av029/ascenttimeline.html)
ToSeek's Juno Launch thread (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/118555-ToSeek-ToKSC-ToTweet).
NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Just in time, left a little early. NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) is covering the launch as well. ("Hold an additional 5 minutes", dunno if that is additional to the ones ToSeek mentioned)

bunker9603
2011-Aug-05, 03:36 PM
At 11:35 est extend Hold another 5 minutes

slang
2011-Aug-05, 03:37 PM
About an hour left in the launch window.

slang
2011-Aug-05, 03:40 PM
Another 10 minute extension to the hold.

Swift
2011-Aug-05, 03:42 PM
From the launch blog:

Centaur Helium System Evaluation in Progress
Fri, 05 Aug 2011 11:37:12 AM EDT


The launch team is evaluating an issue with the charge cycles of the Centaur helium system, comparing the data seen today with what was seen previously in a fueled countdown dress rehearsal. Troubleshooting also includes a leak check. The T-4 minute hold will be extended in five-minute increments as the team works to resolve the issue, and the Juno spacecraft remains on external power for now.

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 03:43 PM
Three five-minute holds and a ten-minute hold requested so far. Launch now no earlier than 11:59 am EDT. Still 44 minutes left in launch window after that.

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 03:43 PM
Launch team is now recommending a go, values are not perfect but still within range.

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 03:45 PM
Range is currently a no-go, didn't catch why.

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 03:46 PM
Launch team is now recommending a go, values are not perfect but still within range.

Further detail: there was a leak, but it was on the ground side. That they can live with.

Garrison
2011-Aug-05, 03:48 PM
And a boat in the box apparently

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 03:48 PM
Range is currently a no-go, didn't catch why.

Apparently there's a boater in the "danger box". Helicopters dispatched to encourage them to be elsewhere.

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 03:51 PM
Another five-minute delay. Now looking at 12:04 pm.

Swift
2011-Aug-05, 03:53 PM
Testing Indicates Vehicle is Healthy
Fri, 05 Aug 2011 11:50:08 AM EDT


Testing indicates the Centaur helium system issue is due to ground support equipment, rather than the vehicle itself. So the team is working to figure out how to maintain the required helium flow and cycling until liftoff. Also, the Eastern Range reports a boat has strayed into the launch danger area offshore, and helicopters are on their way to the area to encourage the boater to move.

"We're cautiously hopeful we'll be launching within the window," said NASA Launch Commentator George Diller

Looks like we may go

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 03:54 PM
Another five-minute delay. Now looking at 12:04 pm.

Technical issues have been resolved. Waiting for range issue to be resolved.

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 03:56 PM
Another five-minute hold. 12:09 pm. Still 34 minutes in launch window.

slang
2011-Aug-05, 03:58 PM
16:13Z now.. 12:13 PM EST.

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 03:58 PM
Just set a new launch time of 12:13 pm. Still waiting for range to clear.

Garrison
2011-Aug-05, 04:00 PM
If the boat won't move may I suggest dropping something heavy out of one of the helicopters? :)

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 04:04 PM
12:18.

bunker9603
2011-Aug-05, 04:05 PM
If the boat won't move may I suggest dropping something heavy out of one of the helicopters? :)

Sounds like a Great Idea!

Swift
2011-Aug-05, 04:06 PM
If the boat won't move may I suggest dropping something heavy out of one of the helicopters? :)
How about something like a spent Centaur first stage? :)

Garrison
2011-Aug-05, 04:07 PM
How about something like a spent Centaur first stage? :)

But where are you going to get one of those? Oh right. :)

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 04:08 PM
Range, weather, launch vehicle all go for the 12:18 T-0 time.

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 04:09 PM
12:25.

bunker9603
2011-Aug-05, 04:10 PM
12:25.

Fingers crossed...

bunker9603
2011-Aug-05, 04:11 PM
I always worry that another issue will crop up during the extended holds.

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 04:16 PM
Spacecraft to internal power, taking other actions in preparation for picking up the count.

slang
2011-Aug-05, 04:17 PM
NASA Juno Webpage (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/main/index.html)
South West Research Institute Juno page (http://missionjuno.swri.edu/) (media heavy site, loads slowly)
Juno Launch Press Kit (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/press_kits/JunoLaunch.pdf)
Juno Wikipedia page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juno_%28spacecraft%29)
Spaceflight Now Mission Status Center (http://spaceflightnow.com/atlas/av029/status.html)
Spaceflight Now Ascent Timeline (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/atlas/av029/ascenttimeline.html)
ToSeek's Juno Launch thread (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/118555-ToSeek-ToKSC-ToTweet).
NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Countdown about to resume.

slang
2011-Aug-05, 04:19 PM
Launch director: you have permission for launch.

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 04:19 PM
Just went through final poll, everyone go for launch at 12:25.

Garrison
2011-Aug-05, 04:19 PM
It's looking good...

ToSeek
2011-Aug-05, 04:19 PM
Don't expect any more posts from me once the countdown starts up again.

slang
2011-Aug-05, 04:24 PM
Enjoy the launch, Kevin!

*jealous*

1 minute left....

slang
2011-Aug-05, 04:26 PM
Already past Max Q!

slang
2011-Aug-05, 04:27 PM
5 srbs separated

Swift
2011-Aug-05, 04:28 PM
Looks good so far, except that the colors on NASA TV are weird (green and purple)

slang
2011-Aug-05, 04:29 PM
Throttling to maintain 5 Gs! Wow, that baby is fast.

slang
2011-Aug-05, 04:30 PM
Booster sep... what a great sight to see it tumble away... Featured in a CT UFO post soon? :)

slang
2011-Aug-05, 04:31 PM
Fairing gone too, apparently. Missed that.

Garrison
2011-Aug-05, 04:33 PM
I missed a heartbeat when that display went to no data...

Gemini
2011-Aug-05, 04:34 PM
We've come a long way from the booster cameras used for the Apollo program.

slang
2011-Aug-05, 04:40 PM
Half hour coasting phase now.

BetaDust
2011-Aug-05, 05:20 PM
Spacecraft Separation. Juno is on its way!!

Really great launch!

Zvezdichko
2011-Aug-05, 05:36 PM
They have still to confirm that the solar panels have been deployed and the spacecraft is power positive

BetaDust
2011-Aug-05, 05:40 PM
They have still to confirm that the solar panels have been deployed and the spacecraft is power positive

One way or Another, It's still on it's way ;)

Zvezdichko
2011-Aug-05, 05:42 PM
One way or Another, It's still on it's way ;)

This is what I would call black humour :D

Put this way, the Soviet probe Mars 1 was the first to reach Mars.

BetaDust
2011-Aug-05, 06:15 PM
Put this way, the Soviet probe Mars 1 was the first to reach Mars.

Well it did. It was just.. Dead. And missed Mars by +/-180.000 Km. ;)
Wikipedia: Mars 1. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_1)


But Juno will do just fine. (Be an optimist! for once Zwez!)

Zvezdichko
2011-Aug-05, 06:36 PM
Optimist or pessimist, we already have good news :) Solar panels have been deployed!

BetaDust
2011-Aug-05, 06:58 PM
Optimist or pessimist, we already have good news :) Solar panels have been deployed!

That's the Spirit! ;)

BTW Do you have a Source/Link on that?

Zvezdichko
2011-Aug-05, 07:00 PM
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/news/juno20110805.html

BetaDust
2011-Aug-05, 07:13 PM
Thank you Zvez.


Update: Engineers have received communications from the Juno spacecraft, and its solar arrays have deployed.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/ju...o20110805.html


---------------

NASA Juno Webpage (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/main/index.html)
South West Research Institute Juno page (http://missionjuno.swri.edu/) (media heavy site, loads slowly)
Juno Launch Press Kit (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/press_kits/JunoLaunch.pdf)
Juno Wikipedia Page (http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juno_%28spacecraft%29)
Spaceflight Now Mission Status Center (http://spaceflightnow.com/atlas/av029/status.html)
Spaceflight Now Ascent Timeline (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/atlas/av029/ascenttimeline.html)
ToSeek's Juno Launch thread. (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php/118555-ToSeek-ToKSC-ToTweet)
NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

slang, Thank you for sharing your Linkfarm.

-- Dennis

KaiYeves
2011-Aug-05, 07:31 PM
Missed the launch because of a driving lesson, but I was able to watch the replays on NASA TV. Off she goes!

Swift
2011-Aug-05, 07:54 PM
Missed the launch because of a driving lesson...
Rover driving? ;)

slang
2011-Aug-05, 09:16 PM
NASA Television youtube video of the launch (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EIyt5EBUlfM&feature=player_profilepage).

Commodore
2011-Aug-06, 01:17 AM
I know it's not it's primary mission, but hopefully Juno will get some good shots at Jupiter's famed satellites as well.

Zvezdichko
2011-Aug-06, 08:11 AM
I know it's not it's primary mission, but hopefully Juno will get some good shots at Jupiter's famed satellites as well.

I don't think there will be opportunities because Juno is in polar and not equatorial orbit.

BetaDust
2011-Aug-06, 11:44 AM
And there are websites attached to this forum:
From the BA (http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2011/08/05/juno-on-its-way-to-jupiter/) & UT (http://www.universetoday.com/87976/juno-blasts-off-on-science-trek-to-discover-jupiter%e2%80%99s-genesis/) Websites.

From: Bad Astronomy: (http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2011/08/05/juno-on-its-way-to-jupiter/)


Juno on its way to Jupiter!

Riding on a plume of fire from its Atlas V rocket, the NASA mission Juno launched at 16:25 UT (12:25 Eastern US time) on its way to Jupiter. more... (http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2011/08/05/juno-on-its-way-to-jupiter/)

From: Universe Today: (http://www.universetoday.com/87976/juno-blasts-off-on-science-trek-to-discover-jupiter%e2%80%99s-genesis/)


Juno Blasts off on Science Trek to Discover Jupiterís Genesis

NASAís solar powered Juno spacecraft blasted off today (Aug.5)from Cape Canaveral today to begin a 2.8 billion kilometer science trek to discover the genesis of Jupiter hidden deep inside the planetís interior. more... (http://www.universetoday.com/87976/juno-blasts-off-on-science-trek-to-discover-jupiter%e2%80%99s-genesis/)

--Dennis

Sardonicone
2011-Aug-06, 05:06 PM
Yawn. Wake me up when we get to Europa!

8)

All these worlds are yours except Europa. Attempt no landings there.

KaiYeves
2011-Aug-06, 06:47 PM
Rover driving? ;)

Nah, regular automobile driving, trying to get my license before I leave for college at the end of the month.

slang
2011-Aug-07, 10:22 AM
I know it's not it's primary mission, but hopefully Juno will get some good shots at Jupiter's famed satellites as well.

Planetary Society blog: Junocam will get us great global shots down onto Jupiter's poles (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00003133/)


A very common question about Junocam is whether it will be able to image Jupiter's moons, especially volcanically active Io. In theory, Junocam can image them, but unless there is a serendipitously close approach, they will never be more than a few pixels across. For example, if Io were directly above Juno it would be at a distance of about 345,000 kilometers and resolution would be 232 kilometers per pixel, so the whole satellite would only be about 16 pixels across. The other moons will be even farther away.

aquitaine
2011-Aug-10, 03:22 PM
Optimist or pessimist, we already have good news :) Solar panels have been deployed!

I have to admit, that they are using solar panels on something like this kind of shows how much NASA is scraping the bottom of the barrel with their radioactive isotope supply.

ToSeek
2011-Aug-10, 03:48 PM
I have to admit, that they are using solar panels on something like this kind of shows how much NASA is scraping the bottom of the barrel with their radioactive isotope supply.

The PI when he talked with us space tweeps indicated that it was more to do with cost than availability.

aquitaine
2011-Aug-11, 03:53 AM
But if their supply is getting squeezed then doesn't that drive up prices?

The Jim
2011-Aug-11, 02:07 PM
But it their supply is getting squeezed then doesn't that drive up prices?

No, it has to do with the cost of flying the material and not the cost of the material. The use of solar arrays on Juno has nothing to do with the current supply. This mission would still exist if there was unlimited supply

ugordan
2011-Aug-11, 03:39 PM
The use of solar arrays on Juno has nothing to do with the current supply.
Nice choice of words :D

aquitaine
2011-Aug-16, 05:32 PM
No, it has to do with the cost of flying the material and not the cost of the material. The use of solar arrays on Juno has nothing to do with the current supply. This mission would still exist if there was unlimited supply


Does anyone know how the mass of its solar arrays and battery pack are? Its arrays are huge, and no doubt are quite heavy.

Ilya
2011-Aug-16, 07:26 PM
IIRC, an RTG adds about $50 million to a mission. Very little of it is the cost of plutonium itself.

tusenfem
2011-Aug-17, 06:00 PM
Ahhhhh I guess I have to milk the Galileo data for all that they are worth, before Juno arrives at Jup, and make all kinds of new discoveries that Juno scientists then can confirm for me ....