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Melusine
2005-Jun-03, 02:32 PM
That is the winning word Anurag Kashyap spelled for the Scripps National Spelling Bee. See the movie "Spellbound" sometime, it's very interesting to see what these kids do to prepare for this contest. Way to go Anurag!!

No. Speller Sponsor Word Spelling Given Error
20. Kashyap, Anurag
The San Diego Union-Tribune, San Diego, California appoggiatura appoggiatura


Pictures are interesting.
http://www.spellingbee.com/05bee/pg05/01/day05/index.shtml

BTW:

Main Entry: ap·pog·gia·tu·ra Pronunciation: &-"pä-j&-'tur-&
Function: noun
Etymology: Italian, literally, support
: an embellishing note or tone preceding an essential melodic note or tone and usually written as a note of smaller size

Eroica
2005-Jun-03, 04:54 PM
Main Entry: ap·pog·gia·tu·ra Pronunciation: &-"pä-j&-'tur-&

That one's easy. It's acciaccatura (http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=acciaccatura) that I always have trouble spelling. :D

Donnie B.
2005-Jun-03, 05:01 PM
When I saw this topic, I thought it was an announcement for another BABB gathering, like TFASUMWBABBDHSEBSSGSTBBQ. Then I looked closer and thought, "Hey, that's clever, somebody made an acronym that's actually pronouncable!"

Then I thought it might be a reference to a painting style or technique. Not too far off, really. The Italians gave us quite a few artistic and musical terms. 8)

Melusine
2005-Jun-03, 05:07 PM
Main Entry: ap·pog·gia·tu·ra Pronunciation: &-"pä-j&-'tur-&

That one's easy. It's acciaccatura (http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=acciaccatura) that I always have trouble spelling. :D
Easy for you! I guess if you like classical music you see the terms more often. A bit longer definition has interesting etymologies:


Main Entry: ac·ciac·ca·tu·ra Pronunciation Guide
Pronunciation: ()ächäktr
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural acciaccaturas \-rz\; or acciaccatu·re \-r, -r\

Etymology: Italian, literally, crushing, from acciaccare to crush (probably

from Spanish achacar to impute falsely, accuse,

from Arabic dialect 'atshakka, 5th form of Arabic shaka to complain) + -ura -ure

1 in early keyboard music : a short grace note sounded with a principal note or chord before which it appears and immediately released while the tone of the principal note or chord is sustained
2 : SHORT APPOGGIATURA

There's double, short and long appoggiatura, too. Oh, the Italians love to talk. :D

Gillianren
2005-Jun-03, 05:18 PM
heck, most of the Italian I know, I picked up in the course of my musical training. (would I have gotten that word? maybe. I'm not sure I ever came across it.)

papageno
2005-Jun-04, 11:51 AM
Appoggiatura? :o

That is a technical term: I have never seen it used anywhere in modern texts.

mickal555
2005-Jun-04, 12:32 PM
Unless you already new that word That would be impossible. image all the other technacal word he'd have to memorise...

Looks like fun though I wonder how I'd go.... #-o

Maksutov
2005-Jun-04, 12:45 PM
Appoggiatura? :o

That is a technical term: I have never seen it used anywhere in modern texts.
It's common in modern musical texts and is still part of the musical language. It definitely was current when I was studying music. Here's an example. (http://www.music.vt.edu/musicdictionary/texta/Appoggiatura.html)

Now, passacaglia (http://www.music.vt.edu/musicdictionary/textp/Passacaglia.html) would have been good too (with that silent "g")! May be combined with chaconne (http://www.music.vt.edu/musicdictionary/textc/Chaconne.html). Can anyone spell "Brahms"?

papageno
2005-Jun-04, 12:49 PM
Appoggiatura? :o

That is a technical term: I have never seen it used anywhere in modern texts.
It's common in modern musical texts and is still part of the musical language. It definitely was current when I was studying music. Here's an example. (http://www.music.vt.edu/musicdictionary/texta/Appoggiatura.html)
A native Italian speaker should not have a problem spelling appoggiatura (spelling follows closely the sound).
However, besides people studying music, it is not a term used in normal conversation and texts. That's what I meant with "technical term".

Candy
2005-Jun-04, 01:43 PM
Where's Brady Yoon? He's our famous BABB Spelling Bee contestant. Perhaps, he could shed some insight on the competition.

On the morning News a couple of days ago, they were showing some clips from last year. I didn't realize one of the contestants passed out. He then got up and finished the word. Amazing!

Melusine
2005-Jun-04, 03:11 PM
Candy wrote:On the morning News a couple of days ago, they were showing some clips from last year. I didn't realize one of the contestants passed out. He then got up and finished the word. Amazing!
Yes, spelling is stressful, as stressful as...physics. 8)

Melusine
2005-Jun-04, 03:21 PM
BTW, yesterday all these Italian words made me hunger for this new Italian restaurant that opened near my work, though it's sort of a fusion with Spanish cuisine. Oh man, they have the best olive oil for dipping bread into--I mean the best I've had. It's a bit spicy, maybe too salty, but is so good with that wonderful hard crusted, soft inside bread and the garlic bread sticks; no vampires would get near me. I had talapia, however, in some ridiculous low-calorie attempt at dieting--it was smothered in a jalapeno alfredo sauce. :roll:

Not to mention the whole basket of bread I ate.....

I could just dip bread in olive oil or in a good marinara sauce as the main meal. All I needed was a good aria to go along with it.

http://www.smiliegenerator.de/smiley-flag/smiley-13060.png

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Eroica
2005-Jun-04, 04:16 PM
BTW, yesterday all these Italian words made me hunger for this new Italian restaurant that opened near my work,
Speaking of Italian food, panini, focaccia and lasagne seem to be among the most frequently misspelled culinary terms. Also desiccated.