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Melusine
2005-Jun-12, 02:36 AM
Ok, this is Saturday night fluff, but the byline is a pretty good one. A few people here have referred to themselves as "nerds," so I thought I'd give them a little promotion. It gets better at the end of the article. :lol:


Ready for a real relationship? Ditch the
pretty boys and grab yourself a geek

SNIP

"A nerd is an excellent provider and a guy who puts you first," says E. Jean Carroll, Elle magazine's love and sex advice columnist. "He'll turn out to be a great father and a great husband."

And, she insists that a woman who is willing to stick it out with a nerd and get past his quirks will be handsomely rewarded. "Don't give up on him too fast," she said. "If you stick with him, he's going to turn out to be really great."

SNIP

How can a savvy girl land a geek of her own? Spencer Koppel, a self-proclaimed geek who attends crossword-puzzle tournaments on weekends, has made it easy for girls with their eye on the prize with his "Geek to Geek" dating service, www.gk2gk.com.

Members can meet and select a perfect mate (guys with screen names like "thinkspecs" and "ivygrad") based on favorite board game and gadget instead of eye color, height and other categories the nerds might be lacking.

And according to Koppel, the pool is stocked with supreme sci-fi fans and accomplished intellects.

"I think geeks are more successful. They're happier in the work they do," Koppel said. "And they're pretty faithful people, because they're certainly grateful for anything they have."

SNIP

"My ex and I bonded over 'Star Trek,' and on our first date at an amusement park, my current boyfriend impressed me with his intricate understanding of the physics of roller coasters. He's a mechanical engineer."

http://www.nydailynews.com/front/story/317296p-271224c.html
The red-bolding is mine--I love rollercoasters, and if my date explained the physics of them, it would probably get my motor running, too. :lol: :P

Melusine
2005-Jun-12, 03:05 AM
Well, and if one can't get a date to the Prom, there's always this new Japanese ballroom robot:


The world's first ballroom-dancing robot is set to take to the floor for its first public performance this week at the World Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan.

Developed by scientists at Tokhuro University, the Partner Ballroom Dance Robot (PBDR) is able to predict the steps of a human partner based on body movement and react accordingly on its three wheels.

The 1.65 meter robot has a female face, wears a ballgown and comes in bright pink and pastel blue plastic. A male version is also being developed.

Full article: http://www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/06/07/robots.ballroom/index.html

Edit typo

Kristophe
2005-Jun-12, 03:11 AM
Ready for a real relationship? Ditch the
pretty boys and grab yourself a geek

Erm, why can't geeks be pretty boys, too? I don't want to have to pick just one ;)

Melusine
2005-Jun-12, 03:31 AM
Ready for a real relationship? Ditch the
pretty boys and grab yourself a geek

Erm, why can't geeks be pretty boys, too? I don't want to have to pick just one ;)
The problem is this last point in the article:

Even the once-naughty Aguilera managed to find a guy who defines devotion and doesn't compete to be the sexiest one in the relationship. Clearly, it's what a girl wants.
Geeks can be "pretty boys," too, but they are a rare species, indeed. I can vouch from experience (perhaps too much) that most "pretty boys" are too vain and attention-grabbing-competitive for equally pretty women. There's a comment in there about them looking in the mirror, and it's so true. I think intelligence goes a long way in making a geeky person more attractive...my longest-term relationship was with a guy who was not technically good-looking, but he wasn't ugly either. He was very intelligent, had geeky interests (though he was hardly square either), and a few other things. OTOH, he was a bit insecure and/or paranoid, since he was not the physically attractive one...unfortunately, he was very misguided in having that attitude and it was the basis of the relationship's demise. [-X

Vanity is counter-productive to attractive geekiness. And it's true, a true geek won't put up with a ditzy babe for long. :P

Melusine
2005-Jun-12, 03:40 AM
Oh my, there are plenty of geeks in Australia too!

University of Melbourne, Holy Men In Tights, A Super Heroes Conference (http://www.ahcca.unimelb.edu.au/Superheroes/about.html)


This interdisciplinary conference will address the varying roles, identities, and social functions that these enduring beings serve. A diversity of approaches will be undertaken including: historical approaches; censorship codes; industry and franchise differentiation (e.g. DC vs. Marvel Comics); mythology; national and cultural specificity; gender identity and power shifts; ethnicity, class and race; diverse media formats (cinema, comics, computer games, television) and their distinctive versions of superheroes; the female superhero; serial form and the cliff hanger; the resurgence in the cult of superpowers in recent cinema; the supervillain; the super-collective; super-auteurs (e.g. Frank Miller, Alan Moore, Tezuka Osamu, Grant Morrison); superhero universes (e.g. Matrix, Star Wars); fan culture and superheroes; the science and physics of the superhero; ancient superheroes; and the 'hero' who isn't 'super'.
BTW, the guy whose site I cull these from is a geek in Connecticut I adore. :)

Gullible Jones
2005-Jun-12, 04:33 AM
Why is it always assumed that nerds are guys? There are a lot of female geeks out there...

hippietrekx
2005-Jun-12, 04:48 AM
The best breeding ground for tomorrow's geeks was at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF) I participated in this year. It is the largest pro-college science fair! (oooh!)

Hey, I found a geek (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=21089&start=150) there. (scroll towards the bottom of the linked page) And he was nice too... :D

Anyway, ISEF was 53% male and 47% female of a total of 1,444 participants. So at least 678.68 female high-school geeks exist. Including me.

Back to topic... I've never really liked pretty-boys or jocks... just my own kind. For instance... I've never had a 'thing' for Brad Pitt, but Bill Gates on the other hand... 8-[

Nothing ever beats a smart guy... unless maybe it's a funny guy... Oh... best of all would be a geeky & witty guy... 8)

--htx

Andromeda321
2005-Jun-12, 05:02 AM
GJ- Case in point. 8)
By the way, I went to that website in the article and if you check out the "I'm a [blank] searching for a [blank]" the options for the blank are male, female, and other. Now I don't know why but somehow that cracks me up. :lol:

Melusine
2005-Jun-12, 05:21 AM
Why is it always assumed that nerds are guys? There are a lot of female geeks out there...
I don't happen to think geeks are just guys...I mean, I think there are some girl-geeks here, too! :wink:

I know aforementioned ex-boyfriend and I did some geeky things--at least my sister laughed at me often about some of the things we did--but he was a cool geek. I'm too embarrassed to mention some of the things we did, but they were just not typical, let's say. For some reason I am suddenly reminded of this kid from 9th grade on the bus of our French class trip to Quebec, and how he was reading the entire Encyclopedia Brittanica. He was on the letter L at the time. :o

Gullible Jones
2005-Jun-12, 05:21 AM
At my high school, the female geeks seem to outnumber the male ones. (Could be because female students outnumber male students.)


I've never had a 'thing' for Brad Pitt, but Bill Gates on the other hand...

Uhh... Bill Gates? I dunno, he may be a geek but his software is not very endearing... :lol:


GJ- Case in point. 8)

I don't think you'd like me if you knew what I look like. :oops:

Melusine
2005-Jun-12, 05:24 AM
GJ- Case in point. 8)
By the way, I went to that website in the article and if you check out the "I'm a [blank] searching for a [blank]" the options for the blank are male, female, and other. Now I don't know why but somehow that cracks me up. :lol:
Is "other" for transgenders or transsexuals or something? Geekiness doesn't seem to be gender-specific. :D

mickal555
2005-Jun-12, 06:01 AM
The term 'geek" seems really forgin to me, it's not a common word here...
I'm not a nerd or a geek- I'm just "me". One of my friends is a borderline nerd though.



At my high school, the female geeks seem to outnumber the male ones. (Could be because female students outnumber male students.)

Man you are so lucky!




I've never had a 'thing' for Brad Pitt, but Bill Gates on the other hand...


Uhh... Bill Gates? I dunno, he may be a geek but his software is not very endearing... :lol:
hmmm... Since most "geeks" don't like microsoft- is bill gates a geek?



GJ- Case in point. 8)

I don't think you'd like me if you knew what I look like. :oops:
We've yet to see a photo so you never know.

Van Rijn
2005-Jun-12, 08:46 AM
The term 'geek" seems really forgin to me, it's not a common word here...
I'm not a nerd or a geek- I'm just "me". One of my friends is a borderline nerd though.


Here, the terms (especially "geek") became much more common in the late 1990s. I used to hate the words, but "geek" and to a lesser extent "nerd" don't seem to be taken nearly as negatively these days. In some circles it is used as an honorific.



hmmm... Since most "geeks" don't like microsoft- is bill gates a geek?


Ohhh, yes, Gates is the epitome of geekiness. It may be shocking, but there are a lot of Microgeeks out there locked in battle with the Penguin Warriors. Anyway, it isn't a popularity contest and in the classic use of the term it was pretty much assumed geeks weren't popular.

Kristophe
2005-Jun-12, 02:29 PM
The term 'geek" seems really forgin to me, it's not a common word here...
I'm not a nerd or a geek- I'm just "me". One of my friends is a borderline nerd though.


Here, the terms (especially "geek") became much more common in the late 1990s. I used to hate the words, but "geek" and to a lesser extent "nerd" don't seem to be taken nearly as negatively these days. In some circles it is used as an honorific.

I'm sorry, but when I hear "nerd", I always think in terms of "Revenge of the," and take the term to be rather insulting. Let me bite the head off a chicken any day ;)

Melusine
2005-Jun-12, 02:46 PM
As the article states, "geeks" are popular now. I agree that nerd still has that "Revenge of the Nerds" flavor to it. I think I remember Jay Utah referring to himself as a geek, and noting the difference between *geek* and *nerd*. I like to think of *geek* as a "type" of a person (though loosely, don't want to box in people), and *nerd* as more of an attitude or behavioral trait, such as, "You're acting like a dweeb (nerd)." But nerd is evolving, too, I guess.

Geeks making reality shows:

If Hollywood is any indication, then yes, he will. This month, reality TV celebrates geek love with two shows: Ashton Kutcher's "Beauty and the Geek," which pairs braniacs with bimbos for a "social experiment," and the latest installment of "Average Joe," in which a pretty girl woos not-so-studly dudes (airing on June 22).

On Fox's "The O.C.," the nerdy Seth Cohen (played by Adam Brody) didn't just land the adorable Summer Roberts (Rachel Bilson) on TV - he managed to get the girl in real life, too. Bilson (and her character) managed to look past the slicked-down hair to find the witty guy beneath. Cohen's obsession with comic books? Her character deems it sweet. Brody's nasal drawl? Bilson doesn't seem to mind.

umop ap!sdn
2005-Jun-12, 06:01 PM
Is "other" for transgenders or transsexuals or something?
More than likely, because from what I've heard, geekiness is very common among those groups. :D

Stregone
2005-Jun-12, 07:02 PM
Bill gates is a total geek. Its very apparant if you see a video of him speaking or something.

hippietrekx
2005-Jun-13, 03:07 AM
Well, many trekkies dislike the series "Enterprize," but that dosen't mean that "Enterprize" isn't a part of Star Trek...

I know my fellow Math and Science Club members are proud geeks. Most of them aren't typical geeks; they play several sports and are pretty popular.

Geek seems to be a term for general "smartness" or interest in learning.

Nerd however is an unpopular person; a loner that does not interact socially with most others on a daily basis. It's not always a compliment, unless given by a fellow nerd or loner.

I am both geek and nerd. And I'm pretty proud. I've got smarts and I'm rather unique. While I don't have many non-cyber friends, the ones I do have I can depend on. (Hey, even loners have to stick together!)

Who says being a loner isn't good? :D

--htx

Glom
2005-Jun-13, 06:32 AM
I had to read this thread a couple of times to convince myself it was Melusine that posted this, the same Melusine who called me to account for making inappropriate generalisations. Now we have this lesson on the order of society taken straight out of Saved By the Bell.

Melusine
2005-Jun-13, 06:45 AM
I had to read this thread a couple of times to convince myself it was Melusine that posted this, the same Melusine who called me to account for making inappropriate generalisations. Now we have this lesson on the order of society taken straight out of Saved By the Bell.
:lol: The Daily News article is completely complimentary to geeks, and well, it's just cultural information about brainy "geeks." Surely you can tell the difference between this and your raging generalizations about environmentalists, right? :wink:

Besides, "geeks" can be cool; as Htx said above, "Geek seems to be a term for general "smartness" or interest in learning."

I like geeks...do you not consider yourself one? If not, bummer. :P

Candy
2005-Jun-13, 06:48 AM
We are talking about geeks, "right"? Well, I nominate Dr. Brian Cox (in a fantasy only), then Glom. :P

http://home.att.net/~candy.stair/BrianCandy2.jpg

Candy
2005-Jun-13, 06:54 AM
Glom's special to me! He is what I wanted to be at his age, but I fell under the pressures of the PEER. Glom is way cool! 8)

Glom
2005-Jun-13, 06:55 AM
Surely you can tell the difference between this and your raging generalizations about environmentalists, right? :wink:


Apparently being smart makes you a self-esteem lacking loner who's a tender lover. Being good looking makes you arrogant, self-absorbed and a selfish lover. These two ideas are seperate and distinct. I call that a raging generalisation.

Melusine
2005-Jun-13, 07:11 AM
Surely you can tell the difference between this and your raging generalizations about environmentalists, right? :wink:


Apparently being smart makes you a self-esteem lacking loner who's a tender lover. Being good looking makes you arrogant, self-absorbed and a selfish lover. These two ideas are seperate and distinct. I call that a raging generalisation.
I never said that. :o Nor did the article. Where did it say lacking self-esteem loner? Where did it say being good-looking makes you arrogant? The article referred to those who look at themselves in the mirror. I used Kristophe's term "pretty boys" to note in my experience, they are vain. This does not mean all good-looking guys are arrogant, self-absorbed, and selfish lovers (heck no! :P ). I think "pretty boys" pretty much spells the difference between that vain kind of person and someone who is attractive. Then again, this is light babble.

I think you are being funny Glom, without even realizing it. :lol:

edit typo

Gullible Jones
2005-Jun-13, 10:57 AM
Apparently being smart makes you a self-esteem lacking loner who's a tender lover. Being good looking makes you arrogant, self-absorbed and a selfish lover. These two ideas are seperate and distinct. I call that a raging generalisation.


You've hit the nail on the head, man... Down with stereotypes!

mickal555
2005-Jun-13, 11:41 AM
Bill gates is a total geek. Its very apparant if you see a video of him speaking or something.

That isn't geekiness that is AS

AGN Fuel
2005-Jun-13, 11:52 AM
At my high school, the female geeks seem to outnumber the male ones. (Could be because female students outnumber male students.)

Man you are so lucky!


I agree - you are one lucky dude. The opposite gender was desperately poorly represented during my years at Asquith Boys High.....


(probably should have read the brochures a bit closer, I suppose.... #-o )

Kristophe
2005-Jun-13, 01:50 PM
"Pretty boys" isn't my term. It's straight out of the article. And apparently being smart makes you a geek now :-?, while being attractive makes you a pretty boy.

Hate to break it to you, Glom, but "pretty boy" is a pretty widely accepted term to mean "someone who cares more about their looks than the people areaound them".

Melusine
2005-Jun-13, 02:26 PM
I believe I posted the OP article with the disclaimer "Saturday night fluff" for a good reason. I also included articles on a Japanese robot, and a Super Heroes convention in Australia. People on this board have referred to themselves as geeks, Jay Utah, not withstanding; Mopc kids around about being a "nerd," Htx has referred to herself as a geek. I thought the article amusing--some stereotyping, yeah, I get that all the time, too, for being blonde, and I love blonde jokes. :lol:

Take it for what it is.

Right now it looks like Geeks Rule! :wink:

ToSeek
2005-Jun-13, 02:37 PM
Surely you can tell the difference between this and your raging generalizations about environmentalists, right? :wink:


Apparently being smart makes you a self-esteem lacking loner who's a tender lover. Being good looking makes you arrogant, self-absorbed and a selfish lover. These two ideas are seperate and distinct. I call that a raging generalisation.

Everyone who uses sweeping generalizations is an idiot.

farmerjumperdon
2005-Jun-13, 03:41 PM
Glad everyone is in sweeping generalization mode. Here's one:

Nuerotic women make the best lovers. Dont' ask me why. And don't ask for the documentation of my raw research. In my personal experience - it just is.

Nuerotic people just seem to possess more of a flair for the exotic, wild, passionate, erotic, slightly crazy, over-the-top, outside-the-box, spur-of-the-moment kind of behavior that can really make things exciting.

Being strictly hetero, I only have this opinion about women.

I'd be interested to know if any women would agree this sweeping generalization might apply to men also. Since the term geek insinuates some sort of mild nuerosis, or a fixation at best - maybe that's the link the story has uncovered.

Candy
2005-Jun-13, 03:49 PM
I'd be interested to know if any women would agree this sweeping generalization might apply to men also. Since the term geek insinuates some sort of mild nuerosis, or a fixation at best - maybe that's the link the story has uncovered.
I used to have a crush on this psychology assistant professor while at Purdue. He has since moved back to his native country, Canada. He was a freak in the bedroom. I mean "freak". I didn't care for that kind of "romance", so we were just friends. I helped type his thesis. :D

farmerjumperdon
2005-Jun-13, 04:02 PM
The terms we're using are of course highly subjective, but I might draw the line at something wierd enough to be called "freaky."

My barometer would put hard core S & M or animal husbandry for instance in the freaky and unacceptable category; but keep mild fantasy play and sex games in the erotic and acceptable category.

Still prety vague. Oh well, I'm just old-fashioned a a touch modest.

Candy
2005-Jun-13, 04:12 PM
The terms we're using are of course highly subjective, but I might draw the line at something wierd enough to be called "freaky."

My barometer would put hard core S & M or animal husbandry for instance in the freaky and unacceptable category; but keep mild fantasy play and sex games in the erotic and acceptable category.

Still prety vague. Oh well, I'm just old-fashioned a a touch modest.
I'm pretty sure what he had suggested was not legal in the USA.

I like old-fashioned, too. :D