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username24
2005-Jun-13, 08:15 AM
Can a planet coming towards earth which is 5 times greater than earth, STOP EARTH FROM SPINNING OR ROTATING OR MAKE IT GO THE OTHER DIRECTION?


How close(miles, kilo meters) should the other planet be to make earth stop spinning/rotating/going the other direction?

How and Why?

Morrolan
2005-Jun-13, 08:39 AM
if i may ask: why do you ask questions like this and then leave your posts without acknowledging any of the responses?

what is your motivation for these posts and questions? if you never return to a thread it can be considered hit-and-run posting which is not a good thing, and people will ultimately stop responding to you. one might also start to question your motivations. i would suggest you read the FAQ.

[edit typo]

Champion_Munch
2005-Jun-13, 08:47 AM
if i may ask: why do you ask questions like this and then leave your posts without acknowledging any of the repsonses?

what is your motivation for these posts and questions? if you never return to a thread it can be considered hit-and-run posting which is not a good thing, and people will ultimately stop responding to you. one might also start to question your motivations. i would suggest you read the FAQ.

I agree with Morrolan, but I wouldn't suggest reading the FAQ unless you have an awful lot of time on your hands. USE COMMON SENSE.

This question was obviously spurred from a point made in another one of your threads....continue your querie in that topic, especially if it may only take 1 or 2 posts to clear up your answer. It's only polite to answer and acknowledge what other people have replied to you with. Show a little cuertesy.

with regards

Halcyon Dayz
2005-Jun-13, 08:51 AM
7 posts. 7 threads. 7 questions. No good.

Charlie in Dayton
2005-Jun-13, 09:47 AM
Coming toward? No.

Passing closely? How close?

Stop? Maybe.

Spin the other way? Extremely doubtful.

In both cases, the energy liberated would heat the planet to the point of becoming totally liquid again...this, of course, would happen long after we'd all been smeared into a thin red organic paste.

And if there was a planet out there five times the size of Earth, and it was headed our way, don'tcha think we'd have seen it by now?

You and bmpbmp need to get together and take a deep breath.

My suggestion?

Remain clam.

username24
2005-Jun-13, 11:29 AM
[quote="Morrolan"]if i may ask: why do you ask questions like this quote]


Just curious whats wrong with being curious.

Its kind of a what if senario.

mickal555
2005-Jun-13, 11:33 AM
Can a planet coming towards earth which is 5 times greater than earth, STOP EARTH FROM SPINNING OR ROTATING OR MAKE IT GO THE OTHER DIRECTION?


How close(miles, kilo meters) should the other planet be to make earth stop spinning/rotating/going the other direction?

How and Why?

-8km

That would probobly mush the other planet. Earth will become a blobby smear.

Sticks
2005-Jun-13, 12:08 PM
You would only score 30 points in planetary billiards. :lol:

(See HHGTTG)

gopher65
2005-Jun-13, 01:18 PM
And of course, we would see this planet coming from ..... what.... a light year away? Something close to that anyway.

This scenario is almost identical to the "big object hits Earth" scenario. It would have virtually identical results as well.

Jens
2005-Jun-13, 01:27 PM
Just curious whats wrong with being curious.

Its kind of a what if senario.

Nothing's wrong with being curious. Everybody was simply wondering why you kept asking questions but never responded to the responses.

There's nothing really theoretically impossible about something like that happening -- of course, as others have pointed out, we'd all be dead so it wouldn't matter all that much how large it is. A body one tenth of the mass of the earth would kill us all just as dead as one five times larger! :D

The point really is that it is a very unlikely event. There are lots of things in the universe, but they don't usually collide because there is a lot of space and not all that much matter in between. So there's no point in losing sleep over it. There is, as far as we can tell, no massive planet on a collision course with the earth.

But there are lots of bad things that could theoretically happen. A black hole could stray our way. A gamma ray burst could happen in our neighborhood. Some nearly star could supernova. Or probably more likely, a small asteroid could hit us. But these are all "maybe someday" scenarios. In any case, malignancies and atherosclerosis are much more immediate concerns for all of us!

R.A.F.
2005-Jun-13, 01:31 PM
if i may ask: why do you ask questions like this

Just curious whats wrong with being curious.

There's nothing wrong with being curious, but (if I may) Morrolan was asking...


if i may ask: why do you ask questions like this and then leave your posts without acknowledging any of the repsonses?

emphasis mine...

Appearently he was asking why you didn't respond after others had posted...

added...darn Jens beat me too it...:)

NEOWatcher
2005-Jun-13, 01:35 PM
[quote=Morrolan]if i may ask: why do you ask questions like this quote]


Just curious whats wrong with being curious.

Its kind of a what if senario.

From another layperson/newbie - nothing wrong, just a matter of courtesy to acknowledge that you've read or understood the discussion.

I've been reading this bb for many years, and have seen that these kind of posts tend to get ignored (for good reason usually)

I finally joined because sometimes I just want to chime in on a discussion with a (IMO) witty comment, or to ask for a different way of explaining of something. There's lots in this site, and sometimes it's hard to find the answers, but with a little patience, I can usually find or infer what I'm looking for.

It seems to work (at least for a while). I've gotten through the half century mark without being thrown off.

PS. Did a refresh before posting, noticing that now it's just adding my 2 cents.

dgavin
2005-Jun-13, 01:47 PM
Hmmm,

My thinking is that is a massive 5Xearth body came close enough to stop or reverse the spin of our planet, it would too late.

There is something called the Roche Limit, basically what it is, when one massive body (Comet, Moon, Planet, etc) comes close to another more massive body, there is a point at where the gravity of the more massive body will tear apart the smaller one.

I don't know about the math behind the Roche Limit, but thats what you should look into.

DoktorGreg
2005-Jun-13, 02:08 PM
IMO the easiest way to stop the spinning of the planet is to wrap sever million miles of copper wire around it several hundred times, and connect the ends of the wire to a giant tesla coil. In several hundred years the electical discharge will have drained most of the rotational energy of the Earth.

Addittionally, if you could figure out how to modulate the EM broadcast on that scale, you would have an excellent carrier wave to communicate with ET's with.

Morrolan
2005-Jun-14, 02:07 AM
if i may ask: why do you ask questions like this

Just curious whats wrong with being curious.

There's nothing wrong with being curious, but (if I may) Morrolan was asking...


if i may ask: why do you ask questions like this and then leave your posts without acknowledging any of the repsonses?

emphasis mine...

Appearently he was asking why you didn't respond after others had posted...

added...darn Jens beat me too it...:)

exactly, Jens and R.A.F.. most everyone here asks a question at some point and if answers are provided (which they usually are) then an acknowledgment or further question is just common courtesy towards those that take the trouble of answering.

nothing more.

hey, at least i got you to react in a thread if not to the answers to the original question... :P

01101001
2005-Jun-14, 02:58 AM
Now that I think of it, given today's announcement (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=486361#486361), there is a planet, not 5, but 6-8 times the mass of Earth, coming toward us (every other day). It's only about 10 lightyears away! Oh, no!

It's the new light member of the Gliese 876 system, with a 2-day orbit around its sun. Note that every other day it moves away from us, too, so there's no concern due.

===

Hey, I was just woindering if all these exoplanets are giving the astrologers fits. The amount of work to interpret a chart must be booming. What is it, 155 exoplanets now? A very quick Google search led me to many links to what seemed one astrolgogical "study" of exoplanets (and other formerly unknown bodies), but there's gotta be work going on there. After all, bigger charts, more data, means astrologers will be able to charge more for their valueless service.

formulaterp
2005-Jun-14, 03:15 AM
Whew you scared me for a second! Turns out it's actually 15 light-years away, not 10. Now I can get some sleep.

As far as the astrologers go, technically they probably don't need new charts. As all of the exoplanets that have been discovered have been so distant, there orbital motions will only track across a tiny portion of the sky. After all it's not the planets themselves that affect our futures, but rather their apparent line-of-sight position with respect to arbitrary patterns of stars. :D

Maksutov
2005-Jun-14, 05:08 AM
if i may ask: why do you ask questions like this and then leave your posts without acknowledging any of the repsonses?

what is your motivation for these posts and questions? if you never return to a thread it can be considered hit-and-run posting which is not a good thing, and people will ultimately stop responding to you. one might also start to question your motivations. i would suggest you read the FAQ.

I agree with Morrolan, but I wouldn't suggest reading the FAQ unless you have an awful lot of time on your hands. USE COMMON SENSE.[edit]
Actually the FAQs are very concise and to the point. Plus knowing and abiding by the rules that are documented in the FAQs is a condition for participating in this BB.