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beskeptical
2005-Jun-27, 05:32 AM
My dogs seem to sniff away at the numerous nettles in the woods here. Anyone know why they don't seem to react? NC Moore said her lighter colored dog's nose was more sensitive to similar objects. My dogs are black with black noses.

Orpheus
2005-Jun-27, 05:55 AM
My dogs seem to sniff away at the numerous nettles in the woods here. Anyone know why they don't seem to react? NC Moore said her lighter colored dog's nose was more sensitive to similar objects. My dogs are black with black noses.

Well assuming you're talking about the stinging variety and not the merely prickly type i imagine it it would be for the same reason that most peole don't suffer from stings on the palms of their hands i.e. the skin is tougher and not as sensitive to the formic acid that causes the stings (acid burns).

As for the dark nose/light nose hypothesis........i have no clue, all my dogs have been of the black nose persuasion and quite frankly. i find light nosed dogs scary....... and don't even get me started on blue-eyed canines....what's that about! :lol:

Melusine
2005-Jun-27, 09:53 AM
Bestskeptical, as an aside about dog-sniffing, did you see the 60 Minutes segment tonight on Can Dogs Sniff Out Cancer? (http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/01/06/60minutes/main665263.shtml)

Thought you dog lovers, like NC More, might be interested. See the link above for info. I would think that their nose-skin is just tougher, too, but I've never seen a difference between dark vs light-skinned noses, as far as sensitivity. I know a light-nosed dog that put her nose into everything....nothing phased her, but then she wasn't the brightest dog...she ate ice-cubes, too. Well, I shouldn't say she wasn't bright, because I could train her to "speak" on command and such...she was just very free-spirited. :lol:

mickal555
2005-Jun-27, 11:03 AM
..........all dogs seem to like ice cubes..........

N C More
2005-Jun-27, 11:38 AM
For some reason dogs do seem to be less sensitive to nettles. Now, my red collie has a liver colored nose and green/gold eyes and she's generally more allergic (certain foods bother her) than my dark nosed dogs but that could be just an individual difference. Haven't noticed anything specific about nettles though. I'll ask around and see what other others may have noticed.

Paladin
2005-Jun-27, 04:52 PM
..........all dogs seem to like ice cubes..........

Mine likes onions...(a chocolate lab)

We don't have nettles, but my lab got stung by a bee, and seems to have the same allergy I do, because she swelled up and started having difficulty breathing (she was stung on the lip when she tried to catch it). Had to take her to the vet and get a benadryl shot...

N C More
2005-Jun-27, 05:43 PM
Mine likes onions...(a chocolate lab)



Be careful with the onions (http://www.vetinfo4dogs.com/dtoxin.html#Onion%20and%20Garlic%20toxicity%20%20i n%20dogs%20and%20cats) eating too much onion or garlic can cause anemia. Grapes are also bad in excess as well as chocolate (which most people already know about).

BTW, you can buy Benadryl tablets over the counter and keep them on hand for any future allergic episodes, ask your VET what the proper oral dosage would be for your dog.

I finally had some time to read the article on dogs sniffing out cancer. Great link, Melusine, Thanks. I'd heard about this before but it really seems to be taking off here lately. I think it would be absolutely wonderful if dogs could be trained in this!

Paladin
2005-Jun-27, 07:51 PM
Be careful with the onions (http://www.vetinfo4dogs.com/dtoxin.html#Onion%20and%20Garlic%20toxicity%20%20i n%20dogs%20and%20cats) eating too much onion or garlic can cause anemia. Grapes are also bad in excess as well as chocolate (which most people already know about).

BTW, you can buy Benadryl tablets over the counter and keep them on hand for any future allergic episodes, ask your VET what the proper oral dosage would be for your dog.

Well, she only gets to hoover up the onions that fall to the floor when I am dicing them, so she doesn't get much. And yes, I have benadryl tabs in the meds drawer at home for her now. This was just the first time, and we didn't know she was allergic, and if I hadn't taken her in, she would have died 'cause her throat was swelling shut. Pretty scarey, but she is a smart dog and hasn't gotten stung again <insert crossed fingers smiley here>.

beskeptical
2005-Jun-28, 07:56 PM
My dogs eat everything. They will eat whatever falls on the floor during cooking including onions and they love to clean up under the table after meals.

Thanks for the link NC. I had wondered about the chocolate thing since the dog we had as kids got chocolate on occasion without distress. Now I see dose is what matters.

My dogs also eat bugs, including the bees buzzing the clover. I do worry about a throat sting but it hasn't happened so far. I don't know how I can prevent it so, oh well.

I do hope they have learned their slug munching lessons. They have had slug smeared faces once each. Yeeech! It does not wash off easily.

Jim
2005-Jun-28, 09:37 PM
We have a Brittany Spaniel. Brittany's are hunting dogs, prized for their "soft" mouths that can carry prey without damaging it.

She loves to stalk anything that enters "her" backyard... birds, squirrels, dragonflies, butterflies, wasps, toads.

I was bringing her inside one evening when my wife let out a yelp. Our dog had caught a toad and was holding it in her soft mouth, feet dangling out. I took her back outside and made her spit it out. The toad hopped away, dazed but unharmed.