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Cylinder
2005-Jun-30, 09:04 PM
The following timeline is taken from NASA's STS-114 Press Kit (http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/112301main_114_pk_july05.pdf) [PDF].

FLIGHT DAY 1:

Following launch, Discovery’s crew sets up the on-board laptop computer network, checks out the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS) and conducts Detailed Test Objective (DTO) 850, Water Spray Boiler Cooling with Water/PGME Antifreeze.

The crew begins the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS) checkout.

Overnight, Mission Control will downlink data from the Discovery’s Wing Leading Edge (WLE) sensors for analysis by engineers looking for sites of potential debris impacts during launch.

FLIGHT DAY 2:

The Shuttle crew completes SRMS checkout and installs the centerline camera in the Orbiter Docking System.

The crew grapples and unberths the Orbiter Boom & Sensor System (OBSS) and conducts an SRMS/OBSS survey of Discovery’s wing leading edges and nose cap.

The Shuttle’s Ku band antenna is deployed.

The crew begins a checkout of the rendezvous tools.

The crew plays back handheld launch video of the External Tank.

The crew conducts photography of the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) pods.

Orbiter Docking System (ODS) is extended.

The crew performs system checks on the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuits and tools in preparation for upcoming spacewalks.

The crew berths the OBSS.

The crew surveys Discovery’s upper surfaces and the crew cabin using the SRMS.

FLIGHT DAY 3:

The crew begins the final stage of rendezvous operations as Discovery closes in for docking with the International Space Station.

Discovery performs the Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, enabling the Space Station crew to photograph Discovery’s thermal protection systems.

Discovery docks with the Space Station.

The Shuttle and Station crews open the hatches and shake hands.

The crews begin transferring cargo from Discovery to the Station.

The crew uses the Space Station RMS (SSRMS) to grapple the OBSS and hands it off to the SRMS.

FLIGHT DAY 4:

The crew grapples the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with the SSRMS, unberths the MPLM from Discovery and installs it on the Unity module’s Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM).

The SSRMS ungrapples from the MPLM and begins its walk-off to the Mobile Base System (MBS).

The crew uses the OBSS to conduct a survey of Discovery’s heat-protection tiles.

The crew activates the MPLM and ingresses.

The crew configures tools for the first spacewalk and begins Extravehicular Activity (EVA) pre-breathe.

The crew transfers EVA tools and equipment to the Shuttle airlock.

The crew performs a checkout of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue.

The hatches between Discovery and the Space Station are closed and Discovery’s cabin is depressurized to 10.2 pounds per square inch (psi) in preparation for the first spacewalk, to be done from the Shuttle airlock.

FLIGHT DAY 5:

Final preparations begin for the first spacewalk.

The Shuttle crew begins the first spacewalk from the Shuttle airlock.

Hatches between Discovery and the Space Station are opened. Two
crew members move to the Station to perform SSRMS EVA support. Transfer activity resumes.

The spacewalkers perform Shuttle Thermal Protection System Emittance Wash Applicator (EWA) and NOAX (Non-Oxide Adhesive eXperimental) sample repair DTO 848 in Discovery’s payload bay.

The External Stowage Platform-2 (ESP-2) Attachment Device (ESPAD) is unberthed from Discovery and installed onto Quest.

The GPS antenna is removed and replaced on the S0 Truss.

The spacewalkers reconfigure power cables in the Z1 Truss to restore power to control moment gyroscope to.

The crew uses OBSS to scan damaged reinforced carbon-carbon samples on the DTO pallet.

The Shuttle and Station hatches are closed, and the spacewalking astronauts ingress Discovery’s airlock.

Shuttle and Station hatches are reopened.

The Station crew makes preparations for the Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) removal and replacement.

FLIGHT DAY 6:

Transfers continue from Discovery to the Space Station.

Procedures are reviewed for the second spacewalk, EVA tools are checked out and EVA pre-breathe begins.

Hatches between Discovery and the Space Station are closed and the Shuttle cabin is depressurized to 10.2 psi.

FLIGHT DAY 7:

The second spacewalk begins.

Hatches between Discovery and the Station are reopened. Two crew members move to the Station to perform EVA SSRMS support, and transfers resume.

Spacewalkers remove and replace CMG 1, then perform a checkout of the new CMG.

Shuttle and Station hatches are closed and the spacewalkers ingress the Shuttle airlock.

New Station CMG 1 is started.

Shuttle and Station hatches are opened.

FLIGHT DAY 8

Transfers resume between Discovery and the Station.

Discovery’s crew conducts its in-flight news conference.

The crew begins its off-duty period.

The Shuttle crew reviews procedures, configures tools and begins pre-breathe fortomorrow’s third spacewalk from the Shuttle airlock.

Shuttle and Station hatches are closed. The Shuttle cabin is depressurized to 10.2 psi in preparation for tomorrow’s third spacewalk.

FLIGHT DAY 9:

The third spacewalk of the mission begins.

Hatches between Discovery and the Station are opened.

Spacewalkers install an external camera and illuminator on P1 Truss.

SSMRS grapples and unberths ESP-2 from Discovery’s payload bay.

Two MISSE experiments are retrieved from the Quest airlock, and a new MISSE is installed at the top of the P6 Truss.

SSRMS delivers ESP-2 to ESPAD, and spacewalkers install.

Transfers continue between Shuttle and Station.

SSRMS ungrapples ESP-2 and maneuvers to MPLM.

Hatches between Discovery and Station are closed, the spacewalkers re-enter the Shuttle airlock and the third EVA ends.

Hatches between Discovery and the Station are opened.

SSRMS grapples MPLM for tomorrow’s unberth from Unity.

FLIGHT DAY 10:

The crew egresses and deactivates MPLM.

MPLM is uninstalled from Unity.

Rendezvous checkout begins.

The MPLM is berthed in Discovery’s payload bay.

The SRMS maneuvers the OBSS to handoff position.

The SSRMS grapples the OBSS from the RMS.

OBSS is berthed in Discovery’s payload bay.

FLIGHT DAY 11:

Discovery and Station crews bid farewell and close their hatches.

Centerline camera is reinstalled.

Discovery undocks and separates from the Station.

Shuttle crew off-duty period begins.

FLIGHT DAY 12:

Discovery crew performs Flight Control System checkout and begins cabin stowage in preparation for tomorrow’s landing.

Crew performs Reaction Control System hot fire and reviews tomorrow’s deorbit timeline.

KU Band antenna is stowed.

FLIGHT DAY 13:

Discovery’s crew begins deorbit preparations.

Payload bay door is closed for entry.

Deorbit burn occurs.

Landing occurs at Kennedy Space Center.

Cylinder
2005-Jul-13, 04:18 AM
I thought I would give this thread a gentle bump for those following STS-114.

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Jul-13, 04:19 AM
Oh, crud. I read this a few days ago and found it intriguing. Then I didn't post to say so. #-o

Anyway, thanks!

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-Jul-20, 12:12 PM
NASA is targeting Tuesday, July 26 as the earliest possible date to launch the Space Shuttle Discovery on the Return to Flight mission (STS-114). The determination was made during Monday's meeting of the Mission Management Team (MMT) at Kennedy.

http://www.noticias.info/asp/aspComunicados.asp?nid=85232&src=0


A dozen teams, with hundreds of engineers across the country, are expected to complete their battery of tests by Wednesday. While they have not isolated a cause of the sensor circuit failure, they have eliminated a number of possibilities. If the remaining tests are inconclusive, NASA could reload the External Tank with super-cooled propellants to see how the sensor circuit behaves. The tanking could be done as a test or as part of an actual launch countdown.

pghnative
2005-Jul-20, 06:39 PM
why is it STS114? wasn't Columbia STS107? Were there six other missions specified that were cancelled after 107 failed?

<quickly runs to Numbers game to see if 114 has passed>

ToSeek
2005-Jul-20, 07:21 PM
why is it STS114? wasn't Columbia STS107? Were there six other missions specified that were cancelled after 107 failed?

<quickly runs to Numbers game to see if 114 has passed>

I think 107 was postponed as there were shuttle missions 108-113, all going to the ISS.

Launch window
2005-Jul-23, 12:57 PM
Discovery is NASA's countdown to credibility


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8552370/
Successful mission important to agency's long-term future

Nearly three in four Americans favor a continuation of the space shuttle program. And a majority believes that NASA is moving at an appropriate pace in restarting the shuttle effort. A majority also evaluates NASA positively for the job it is doing overall.

The poll, carried out June 24-26, found that 74 percent of Americans say the United States should continue the space shuttle program, while 21 percent disagree. "Historically, Americans have supported the program, even in the immediate aftermath of the Challenger and Columbia shuttle disasters," reported Jeffrey Jones of the Gallup Poll group.

While Americans express support for NASA in general and the space shuttle program in particular, the new poll found the public apparently less likely to favor a human trek to Mars, one of NASA’s — and President George W. Bush’s — future goals for space exploration.

Fifty-eight percent say they oppose setting aside the money for an attempted manned Mars landing, while 40 percent are in favor. Gallup pollsters asked the same question in 1999 and right after the touchdown of Apollo 11 on the Moon in 1969 and found similar results.

ranugad
2005-Jul-23, 06:18 PM
I've tried getting these answers a few times before, and gotten no answer or repetition of what I aleady know...

I've recently learned of http://www.heavens-above.com and have had good results of viewing the ISS pass overhead 3 times now in the past month.

With the upcoming STS mission and subsequent ISS docking I've been trying to find a way to see if it will be possible to view both, and [wishful] approach[/thinking].

I suspect the difficulty in predicting the Shuttle's flight path and ISS (after its planned move into higher orbit) is the reason why.

With the timing of the docking set for
from NASA's Timeline (http://www.nasa.gov/returntoflight/crew/event_timeline.html)
Thursday, July 28 (Flight Day 3):
1:29 a.m.
Rendezvous operations begin

7:18 a.m.
Docking with International Space Station (ISS)

That puts it in the middle of the night for me - in AZ.

Before I plan to situp from 10:30 pm through 4 am, I'd like to get an idea of what my chances are. Any ideas, links to where these projected paths will occur?

http://www.heavens-above.com has no passes listed for my area till around Aug 6.

Jpax2003
2005-Jul-23, 08:50 PM
Discovery is NASA's countdown to credibility


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8552370/
Successful mission important to agency's long-term future

Nearly three in four Americans favor a continuation of the space shuttle program. And a majority believes that NASA is moving at an appropriate pace in restarting the shuttle effort. A majority also evaluates NASA positively for the job it is doing overall.

The poll, carried out June 24-26, found that 74 percent of Americans say the United States should continue the space shuttle program, while 21 percent disagree. "Historically, Americans have supported the program, even in the immediate aftermath of the Challenger and Columbia shuttle disasters," reported Jeffrey Jones of the Gallup Poll group.

While Americans express support for NASA in general and the space shuttle program in particular, the new poll found the public apparently less likely to favor a human trek to Mars, one of NASA’s — and President George W. Bush’s — future goals for space exploration.

Fifty-eight percent say they oppose setting aside the money for an attempted manned Mars landing, while 40 percent are in favor. Gallup pollsters asked the same question in 1999 and right after the touchdown of Apollo 11 on the Moon in 1969 and found similar results.



Maybe that should be a countdown to gullibility. I think that the reason most americans support the STS is because they aren't aware of any viable alternatives. They may be aware that some attempts at designing a higher tech aero-spaceplane didn't pan out and think that the lower tech STS is doable. However, I think that the public may have forgotten that even lower tech systems could be acquired that have lower launch and operational costs allowing more and heavier flights with the same level of funding.

Maksutov
2005-Jul-23, 10:25 PM
I've tried getting these answers a few times before, and gotten no answer or repetition of what I aleady know...

I've recently learned of http://www.heavens-above.com and have had good results of viewing the ISS pass overhead 3 times now in the past month.

With the upcoming STS mission and subsequent ISS docking I've been trying to find a way to see if it will be possible to view both, and [wishful] approach[/thinking].

I suspect the difficulty in predicting the Shuttle's flight path and ISS (after its planned move into higher orbit) is the reason why.

With the timing of the docking set for
from NASA's Timeline (http://www.nasa.gov/returntoflight/crew/event_timeline.html)
Thursday, July 28 (Flight Day 3):
1:29 a.m.
Rendezvous operations begin

7:18 a.m.
Docking with International Space Station (ISS)

That puts it in the middle of the night for me - in AZ.

Before I plan to situp from 10:30 pm through 4 am, I'd like to get an idea of what my chances are. Any ideas, links to where these projected paths will occur?

http://www.heavens-above.com has no passes listed for my area till around Aug 6.
That last sentence is your answer.

If the ISS isn't visible from your location during the time period for the docking, you're not going to able to see the docking.

However, since, if all goes as planned, it will eleven days into the mission when the shuttle undocks with the ISS. That will be August 5th, which is one day before the ISS is visible from your location.

Re the effect of the shuttle increasing the ISS orbit height, based on the anticipated height at reboost, the increase will be about 10 km. This would have the effect of slowing orbital periods, which means ISS visibility might be later than the Heaven's Above prediction.

Therefore, unless there's some kind of delay, it appears you're out of luck for seeing docking or undocking from where you are. Too bad about that, since it's quite a sight even with the unaided eye: two bright stars transversing the sky, moving closer to or farther away from each other as one watches.

BTW, same situation here. No visible ISS passes until August 6th. We'll have to wait and see re shuttle visibility.

Cylinder
2005-Jul-26, 02:57 PM
Tuesday, July 26 is Flight Day 1. Go Discovery!

Glom
2005-Jul-26, 04:26 PM
I think 107 was postponed as there were shuttle missions 108-113, all going to the ISS.

STS 109 was HST SM3B.

Cylinder
2005-Jul-26, 06:07 PM
Here (http://www.boeing.com/news/feature/paris2005/assets/ids_pdfs/External%20Stowage%20Platform-2%20BCKGR%20March%202005.pdf) is some information on the External Stowage Platform-2 (ESP-2) that Discovery will deliver and install on the ISS.


The External Stowage Platform-2 (ESP-2) is an external pallet that can securely hold up to eight critical spare parts or Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs) for the International Space Station (ISS). Space Shuttle Discovery will carry ESP-2 to the ISS on STS-114 in May 2005. An Extravehicular Activity (EVA) or spacewalk, will be required to install the pallet on the mission’s ninth day...

During the first of three spacewalks planned for Discovery’s mission, astronauts will remove the ESP Attachment Device (ESPAD) from ESP-2 and mount it to the ISS airlock using the ISS robotic arm. During the third spacewalk of the mission, the ISS robotic arm will move ESP-2 from the orbiter payload bay and attach it to the ESPAD. After the mechanical/structural work for the ESP-2 is completed, astronauts will connect primary and secondary power cables to the ISS. Primary power for ESP-2 comes from Node 1 and secondary power comes from the S0 truss...

ESP-2 is an unpressurized external storage pallet with eight attachment sites capable of holding up to eight ISS spare parts and assemblies. The pallet also has handrails and attachment points for tethers and foot restraints that astronauts can use while working with the ORUs on the ESP-2.

ESP-2 is scheduled for installation on Wednesday, August 3.

hhEb09'1
2005-Jul-27, 03:08 PM
Therefore, unless there's some kind of delay, it appears you're out of luck for seeing docking or undocking from where you are. Too bad about that, since it's quite a sight even with the unaided eye: two bright stars transversing the sky, moving closer to or farther away from each other as one watches.Second that. And it's a sight that seems to stir even those whose necks aren't accustomed to bending ninety degrees.


BTW, same situation here. No visible ISS passes until August 6th. We'll have to wait and see re shuttle visibility.
The Heavens Above Main Page (http://www.heavens-above.com/) has seen fit to warn "Please note that this mission is not well placed for observation from the northern hemisphere. So don't be disappointed if you get the message 'No visible passes found in the search period'."

Cylinder
2005-Jul-27, 10:51 PM
ISS docking is scheduled for Thursday at 7:18 EDT. Does anyone know if NASA will be feeding live video of the event?

Cylinder
2005-Jul-28, 08:29 PM
Friday, July 29, 2005 (Flight Day 4):

The crew grapples the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with the SSRMS, unberths the MPLM from Discovery and installs it on the Unity module’s Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM).


The SSRMS ungrapples from the MPLM and begins its walk-off to the Mobile Base System (MBS).


The crew uses the OBSS to conduct a survey of Discovery’s heat-protection tiles.


The crew activates the MPLM and ingresses.


The crew configures tools for the first spacewalk and begins Extravehicular Activity (EVA) pre-breathe.


The crew transfers EVA tools and equipment to the Shuttle airlock.


The crew performs a checkout of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue.


The hatches between Discovery and the Space Station are closed and Discovery’s cabin is depressurized to 10.2 pounds per square inch (psi) in preparation for the first spacewalk, to be done from the Shuttle airlock.