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ToSeek
2001-Nov-20, 04:41 PM
http://www.unitedmedia.com/comics/roseisrose/archive/roseisrose-20011120.html

Of course, it's not a meteorite until it hits the ground. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: ToSeek on 2001-11-20 11:44 ]</font>

SeanF
2001-Nov-20, 05:14 PM
On 2001-11-20 11:41, ToSeek wrote:

Of course, it's not a meteorite until it hits the ground. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif



Hmm . . . so if a meteor hits the roof of my car and lands in the back seat, I take it to the local museum, they put it on display, and call it a "meteorite," . . . they're wrong 'cause it never hit the ground?

/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

Valiant Dancer
2001-Nov-20, 05:22 PM
On 2001-11-20 11:41, ToSeek wrote:
http://www.unitedmedia.com/comics/roseisrose/archive/roseisrose-20011120.html

Of course, it's not a meteorite until it hits the ground. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: ToSeek on 2001-11-20 11:44 ]</font>


The good astronomy is that the metorite isn't hot or smoldering. (Pasquale is able to handle it shortly after the "angel" catches it.) One Pasquale has the metorite hasn't it survived reasonably far enough to be called one? It's kinda nit-picky. Hey, BA, if you have a section on GOOD astronomy in the comics, I nominate Rose is Rose.

ToSeek
2001-Nov-20, 06:04 PM
On 2001-11-20 12:14, SeanF wrote:

Hmm . . . so if a meteor hits the roof of my car and lands in the back seat, I take it to the local museum, they put it on display, and call it a "meteorite," . . . they're wrong 'cause it never hit the ground?



Well, that's debatable, but I think if an angel catches it in mid-air, it's still a meteor.

Hat Monster
2001-Nov-20, 06:38 PM
I'd say that after it's finished ablating and being all burny, it's a meteorite if it has survived and isn't dust.
After all, if it survives being burnt in the upper atmosphere then it will get to the ground, so it's a meteorite no matter if it gets to the ground or not.

ToSeek
2001-Nov-20, 06:41 PM
On 2001-11-20 13:38, Hat Monster wrote:
I'd say that after it's finished ablating and being all burny, it's a meteorite if it has survived and isn't dust.
After all, if it survives being burnt in the upper atmosphere then it will get to the ground, so it's a meteorite no matter if it gets to the ground or not.


Actually, you're probably right. I think strictly speaking that "meteor" refers to the streak in the sky that the chunk of rock creates rather than the rock itself. So perhaps I stand corrected. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

Moonpuppy
2001-Nov-20, 09:17 PM
Geez...meteor, meteorite, meteoroid...I wish astronomers would pick ONE word & stick with it! Meanwhile, I'm just gonna call 'em space rocks. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

ToSeek
2001-Nov-21, 01:35 PM
On 2001-11-20 16:17, Moonpuppy wrote:
Geez...meteor, meteorite, meteoroid...I wish astronomers would pick ONE word & stick with it! Meanwhile, I'm just gonna call 'em space rocks. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif


Okay, here goes an explanation: It's a meteoroid when it's out in space and a meteorite when it hits the ground. And a meteor is the streak a meteoroid leaves on its way to becoming a meteorite (assuming it lasts that long). Got that? /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

David Simmons
2001-Nov-21, 02:01 PM
On 2001-11-20 16:17, Moonpuppy wrote:
Geez...meteor, meteorite, meteoroid...I wish astronomers would pick ONE word & stick with it! Meanwhile, I'm just gonna call 'em space rocks. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif



On 2001-11-21 08:35, ToSeek wrote:

Okay, here goes an explanation: It's a meteoroid when it's out in space and a meteorite when it hits the ground. And a meteor is the streak a meteoroid leaves on its way to becoming a meteorite (assuming it lasts that long). Got that? /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif


In order to be as technical and pedantic as possible, I can add this. A meteor is an atmospheric phenomenon such as lightning, snowfall or rainfall - or the streak of light that the rocks make as they burn up in the atmosphere.

David Hall
2001-Nov-21, 02:07 PM
No BA here that I can see. Just think about it this way. Would it have made better sense if he called it his "meteor glove", or "meteoroid glove"? The idea is that the glove stops meteorites, therefore, it's a "meteorite glove".

I can't imagine him needing it more than once in a lifetime though.

Mnemonia
2001-Nov-21, 03:34 PM
I can't imagine him needing it more than once in a lifetime though.


I should hope not. You're more likely to be hit by lightning SEVEN times before being hit by a falling space rock (note I avoided using the M word). Did happen once though.

The rock hitting someone that is, not the seven jolts of lightning.

ToSeek
2001-Nov-21, 04:42 PM
On 2001-11-21 09:01, David Simmons wrote:

In order to be as technical and pedantic as possible, I can add this. A meteor is an atmospheric phenomenon such as lightning, snowfall or rainfall - or the streak of light that the rocks make as they burn up in the atmosphere.


If you take it directly from the Greek, you're right (so that "meteorology" is literally "the study of things in the air"); however, I've never seen meteor used or defined that generally in English.

Mr. X
2001-Nov-21, 05:12 PM
Did happen once though.

The rock hitting someone that is, not the seven jolts of lightning.

LOL! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_lol.gif I can picture someone get hit by a "space rock" but not 7 times by lightning!

I don't know if it ever happened to anyone, or even struck twice. Or thrice! Worse than that? Consecutive or simultaneous! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_lol.gif That's just bad luck!

Space rock on someone, what did it leave the person, relatively dead or relatively rocked? (oh, oh! Bad puns galore!). It certainly "rocked" his world! Maybe they should rename them to "rock"ets! (Oh! Oh! Bad humor galore!)

How do you like my humor? /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

David Hall
2001-Nov-21, 05:33 PM
Roy C. Sullivan. He was struck by lightning seven times between 1942 and 1976. It's in this link (scroll down to the stories in the middle).

http://www.vdes.state.va.us/library/lightning/va-lightning.htm

Mr. X
2001-Nov-21, 05:54 PM
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Surprised to say the least! I did not think it was possible!

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Valiant Dancer
2001-Nov-21, 06:01 PM
On 2001-11-21 12:54, Mr. X wrote:
/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif

Surprised to say the least! I did not think it was possible!

/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif


If I remember correctly, he's a park ranger. Therefore more likely to be struck by lightning. Still, he should go to Vegas. He was affected by a one in 5 billion chance.

Kaptain K
2001-Nov-21, 06:13 PM
Roy C. Sullivan. He was struck by lightning seven times between 1942 and 1976. It's in this link (scroll down to the stories in the middle).
Thanks David for confirming that my memory is still functional. Somewhere deep in my trivia cache was a memory of a Park Ranger who had been struck seven /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif times and lived to tell about it. I couldn't dredge it up as a certainty.

ToSeek
2001-Nov-21, 06:21 PM
On 2001-11-21 13:01, Valiant Dancer wrote:
Still, he should go to Vegas.


Unfortunately, he's no longer with us (though, surprisingly, not because of lightning.)

David Hall
2001-Nov-21, 06:23 PM
Glad to be of service, Kaptain. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

I remembered reading about it in the Guiness Book of World Records a long time ago. It stuck because it was such an unbelievable thing. But of course I didn't remember his name or any details. I had to hit google to dig those up. One thing I noticed in the link I gave was that all but one of the hits happened in an 8 year period. The 1942 hit was well before any of the others.

Oh, and Valiant, I'm afraid he isn't going to be visiting Vegas any time soon. He took his own life several years ago.

ToSeek
2001-Nov-21, 06:29 PM
On 2001-11-21 13:23, David Hall wrote:

I remembered reading about it in the Guiness Book of World Records a long time ago. It stuck because it was such an unbelievable thing.



What is really amazing is that he got struck by lightning a couple of more times after he first made it into the Guinness Book of World Records.

Valiant Dancer
2001-Nov-21, 07:51 PM
On 2001-11-21 13:23, David Hall wrote:
Glad to be of service, Kaptain. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

I remembered reading about it in the Guiness Book of World Records a long time ago. It stuck because it was such an unbelievable thing. But of course I didn't remember his name or any details. I had to hit google to dig those up. One thing I noticed in the link I gave was that all but one of the hits happened in an 8 year period. The 1942 hit was well before any of the others.

Oh, and Valiant, I'm afraid he isn't going to be visiting Vegas any time soon. He took his own life several years ago.



Drat.

David Simmons
2001-Nov-21, 11:05 PM
On 2001-11-21 11:42, ToSeek wrote:

If you take it directly from the Greek, you're right (so that "meteorology" is literally "the study of things in the air"); however, I've never seen meteor used or defined that generally in English.



See the first definition of 'meteor' in the Merrian-Webster Collegiate Dictionary (10th Ed)

Mr. X
2001-Nov-21, 11:14 PM
I am hereby providing integral copies of the definions from Merriam-Webster collegiate dictionary for the words Meteor, Meteorite and Meteoroid.

Note that I am NOT arguing! My knowledge of english is already slim to nil, so I can't argue on technicalities, but here it is for you to read and reach your conclusion YOURSELVES (EXCLUDING me and my various witty remarks) /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

Meteor:
<font size=3>Main Entry: me·te·or
Pronunciation: 'mE-tE-&r, -"or
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French meteore, from Medieval Latin meteorum, from Greek meteOron, from neuter of meteOros high in air, from meta- + -eOros, from aeirein to lift
Date: 15th century
1 : an atmospheric phenomenon (as lightning or a snowfall)
2 a : any of the small particles of matter in the solar system that are directly observable only by their incandescence from frictional heating on entry into the atmosphere b : the streak of light produced by the passage of a meteor
</font>
Meteorite:
<font size=3>Main Entry: me·te·or·ite
Pronunciation: 'mE-tE-&-"rIt
Function: noun
Date: 1824
: a meteor that reaches the surface of the earth without being completely vaporized
- me·te·or·it·ic /"mE-tE-&-'ri-tik/ also me·te·or·it·i·cal /-ti-k&l/ adjective</font>

Meteoroid:
<font size=3>Main Entry: me·te·or·oid
Pronunciation: 'mE-tE-&-"roid
Function: noun
Date: 1865
1 : a meteor particle itself without relation to the phenomena it produces when entering the earth's atmosphere
2 : a meteor in orbit around the sun
- me·te·or·oi·dal /"mE-tE-&-'roi-d&l/ adjective </font>

<font size=5 color=blue><u>ENJOY!</font></u>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Mr. X on 2001-11-21 18:16 ]</font>