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Maksutov
2005-Jul-06, 10:23 AM
Piece of famous Australian landmark crumbles before onlookers (http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/environmentaustraliaapostles;_ylt=AjkRy1EoXBxzjRgW veIybvqs0NUE;_ylu=X3oDMTA3ODdxdHBhBHNlYwM5NjQ-).

I guess the concept of the erosion process is foreign to some people. Heck, we lost The Old Man of the Mountains (http://www.bss.com/2om.html) two years ago here in the US due to similar processes.

kucharek
2005-Jul-06, 10:27 AM
We have similar problems with Helgoland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heligoland) and because Helgoland is slightly smaller than Australia, the issue is more serious for the people there. :)

Harald

Maksutov
2005-Jul-06, 10:34 AM
We have similar problems with Helgoland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heligoland) and because Helgoland is slightly smaller than Australia, the issue is more serious for the people there. :)

Harald
One glance at that first picture had me thinking, "What the heck is sedimentary rock doing there?"

Man, the Brits sure had a grudge match going against that poor island! Just slightly smaller than Australia, but easier to get to, and the taxes are about right!

Any plans to rejoin the two islands?

BTW, I should have called this thread "Down Under Goes Down Under"... :wink:

kucharek
2005-Jul-06, 11:02 AM
IIRC, it was in the 1970's when in Japan a SF novel was very popular. Its title (translated) was "Japan sinks". The story was around the discovery by scientists, that the Japan archipel is going to sink into the Pacific.
Never read it, but I heard it is pretty well written and had some impact that time.

Maksutov
2005-Jul-06, 12:00 PM
It appears there were a lot of "sinking" or "sliding" into the ocean pieces back in the 1970s, as well as a plethora of the "Armageddon" variety. One noon in 1971 I went home from work during lunch hour and found my wife reading The Late Great Planet Earth. That evening I read it in a few minutes (reading speed is in the 1000s of words per minute range, except for math texts), and we discussed the book. The result was we agreed it was pure bunk.

BTW, that's the title of my review of this trash at Amazon:


Pure Bunk
Reviewer: Maksutov "mahlerite1" (MS) - See all my reviews
I read this book in 1971. It was pure bunk back then and it's even purer bunk 35 years after its publication. All of its "predictions" didn't happen. Yet the author continues to be admired in fundamentalist circles. What does that tell you?

I see it's available for $0.01. That would be a waste of a good penny.
Got to see if I can recall other countries sliding into the ocean and other "end-of-the-world" "literary works" from the 70s.

Melusine
2005-Jul-06, 01:58 PM
Mak said:
It appears there were a lot of "sinking" or "sliding" into the ocean pieces back in the 1970s, as well as a plethora of the "Armageddon" variety.
This morning your thread here prompted me to look up the latest on the sinking of Venice, which has been sinking for some time, though it got a slight boost when a plant nearby stopped sucking ground water. Still the sinking is pretty minute each year, though, it's also another issue for global warming advocates.

1000 words per minute [insert jealous face]. I'm just happy if I don't fall asleep...might think about hanging my books and magazines on the computer monitor. :)

Argos
2005-Jul-06, 02:08 PM
A view of the complex (http://www.travel-pictures-gallery.com/imagepageaust21.html) as it used to be. Another one (http://www.opl.ucsb.edu/grace/australia/pics/gor/gor20.jpg)

SeanF
2005-Jul-06, 02:16 PM
...it was almost like a building demolition...
CONSPIRACY! Nothing ever collapses straight down unless it was a controlled demolition!






;)

badchap
2005-Jul-06, 02:45 PM
That part of the Victorian coast is rather spectacular. :)
In 1990. there had also been another similar collapse of limestone rock arch that had been connected to the mainland.
It used to be called "London Bridge" and tourists could walk out over the bridge part, and stand on the stack-part. When the bridge part suddenly fell away into the sea, there were several people stranded on the stack that was left. They had to wait several hours to be plucked off by a rescue helicopter.

badchap
2005-Jul-06, 02:51 PM
I should add that the former rock arch structure was also in the same area as that group of limestone seastacks that are ( increasingly inaccurately ) named "The twelve apostles".

Moose
2005-Jul-06, 02:58 PM
...it was almost like a building demolition...
CONSPIRACY! Nothing ever collapses straight down unless it was a controlled demolition!

Exactly, it's not like gravity is predictable or anything. Objects simply don't consistently fall "down" when dropped. Gravity is just a theory, after all.

...

What?





;)

Ditto.

Kristophe
2005-Jul-06, 09:49 PM
After withstanding the pounding of the sea for an estimated 6,000 years, the 45-metre (150 yard) rock pile tumbled into a collection of rocks and debris on Sunday morning before a bewildered Sydney family.

Do Aussies have a different definition of a yard than we do in North America? 'Cause I calculate 45 metres to be 50 yards, or 150 feet.

hewhocaves
2005-Jul-07, 02:14 AM
i just had a thought...

when Australia erodes into the sea, where will we keep all the Kangaroos??

:D

the town that I grew up in, Clifton NJ, was named in the early 1900s after the large cliffs on the nearby hills overlooking the town. By 1980 quarrying operations had completely eaten away everything behind the cliffs, leaving only a think vertical pillar of rocks. A couple of years later, they detonanted the cliffs.

Now Clifton has no cliffs. Any town that lets it's namesake go like that deserves the backup name that Clifton rejected.

"Weasel"

(after a large brook that wound through the town)

Maksutov
2005-Jul-07, 02:35 AM
i just had a thought...

when Australia erodes into the sea, where will we keep all the Kangaroos??

:D

the town that I grew up in, Clifton NJ, was named in the early 1900s after the large cliffs on the nearby hills overlooking the town. By 1980 quarrying operations had completely eaten away everything behind the cliffs, leaving only a think vertical pillar of rocks. A couple of years later, they detonanted the cliffs.

Now Clifton has no cliffs. Any town that lets it's namesake go like that deserves the backup name that Clifton rejected.

"Weasel"

(after a large brook that wound through the town)
That's hilarious! Re the name, not re the poor cliffs.

I don't know about the kangaroos, but, on The Tonight Show on New Year's Eve in 1969, Johnny Carson had asked Criswell to be a guest and provide his predictions for the new year, etc. One of Criswell's predictions was as follows:

[Criswell voice]For the next year I predict...Wombats in Weehauken![/Criswell voice]

at which point Carson did a double take and said

[Carson voice]Wombats in Weehauken?[/Carson voice]

to which Criswell replied

[Criswell voice]Wombats in Weehauken!{/Criswell voice]

and moved on to his next prediction.

So now we know where the wombats will probably wind up, plus or minus 36 years or so. And just down Joisy Route 3 from Weasel. :D

AGN Fuel
2005-Jul-07, 02:52 AM
i just had a thought...

when Australia erodes into the sea, where will we keep all the Kangaroos??

:D



They'll hop on board the liferafts and make for Roo-mania... (thanks folks - I'm here till Thursday).

hewhocaves
2005-Jul-07, 03:28 AM
That's hilarious! Re the name, not re the poor cliffs.

the sad thing is that we hada perfectly servicable name until 1900. Clifton used to be Acquackanonk. Its a lovely Delaware name which means (roughly):

Land between the cliff and the river which will be taken by the white man and oh yeah, they're going to knock down the cliff, too.

Truth be told, Weasel would have been a more appropriate name for the town. It's a very nice large stream that runs through the city. Of course most of it has been diverted underground (causing occasional basement flooding)

Here's (http://www.passaiccountynj.org/ParksHistorical/Parks/weaselbrookpark.htm) a picture of the runner up of the 1917 "Name that city" competition.

And here (http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Clifton,+NJ&ll=40.874113,-74.190202&spn=0.021119,0.029721&t=k&hl=en) is a satellite photo of the quarry that ate the town's name. The cliffs would have been on the right side of the quarry. They were more like spires along the lines of Seneca Rocks (http://ickyfoot.com/photos/album17/Seneca_005) only much, much smaller. And they were colored more like the Palisades (http://www.fortleeonline.com/gallery/ftleegallery7.html) by NYC (they share the same origin, in fact.)

Amazingly, I could not find a picture of the cliffs. Apparantly the internet is incomplete :o

mickal555
2005-Jul-07, 03:36 AM
I've been to the 12 apposele's- It's pretty sad that one fell over- it was the best :cry:

paulie jay
2005-Jul-07, 04:13 AM
After withstanding the pounding of the sea for an estimated 6,000 years, the 45-metre (150 yard) rock pile tumbled into a collection of rocks and debris on Sunday morning before a bewildered Sydney family.

Do Aussies have a different definition of a yard than we do in North America? 'Cause I calculate 45 metres to be 50 yards, or 150 feet.
Nah - a yard is a yard. We have, however, been using metres since the late 1960s, so it's probably a case of the reporter getting that wierd feet and inches thing mixed up. :D :P

Jpax2003
2005-Jul-07, 10:25 AM
So does the pillar that fell down represent Judas?

Maksutov
2005-Jul-07, 10:33 AM
So does the pillar that fell down represent Judas?
Nah, its support structure just petered out.

Remember, all rocks are subject to erosion. :wink:

Jim
2005-Jul-07, 12:37 PM
It appears there were a lot of "sinking" or "sliding" into the ocean pieces back in the 1970s...

I recall a bit on Laugh In (late '60s?) when they did the News of the Future, 25 years from today. Something like,

"Fears that recent seismic activity along the Pacific Rim may cause widespread devestation along the West Coast are completely unfounded. There is no reason to believe that any major earthquakes are going to occur, or that the coast will 'slide into the ocean.' This statement was issued by President Ronald Reagan from the western White House overlooking the Pacific Ocean, just outside Topeka, Kansas."

Well, they got part of it right.

Maksutov
2005-Jul-07, 12:44 PM
It appears there were a lot of "sinking" or "sliding" into the ocean pieces back in the 1970s...

I recall a bit on Laugh In (late '60s?) when they did the News of the Future, 25 years from today. Something like,

"Fears that recent seismic activity along the Pacific Rim may cause widespread devestation along the West Coast are completely unfounded. There is no reason to believe that any major earthquakes are going to occur, or that the coast will 'slide into the ocean.' This statement was issued by President Ronald Reagan from the western White House overlooking the Pacific Ocean, just outside Topeka, Kansas."

Well, they got part of it right.
Late 1960s?

That most likely would have been President Noxin (rhymes with 'toxin"). You remember him, the one who tried to take the spotlight during the Apollo 11 mission, and then killed funding for the entire project. :evil:

Ah, OK, 25 years in the future, so, we're in 1994.

"This is yer President. Have no fear. Ah feel yer pain. Ouch! Stop that, Monica!"