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jfribrg
2005-Jul-08, 04:00 PM
Here (http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/index.asp?partner=accuweather) is a summary of Hurricane Dennis.


Hurricane Dennis, a major Category 4 storm with top sustained winds of 505 mph, continues to move northwestward near the south coast of Cuba

That will no doubt be corrected soon, but I would think that something that strong should be about category 10.5 (maybe we could have a sequel to the earthquake movie....).

Melusine
2005-Jul-08, 04:06 PM
Here (http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/index.asp?partner=accuweather) is a summary of Hurricane Dennis.


Hurricane Dennis, a major Category 4 storm with top sustained winds of 505 mph, continues to move northwestward near the south coast of Cuba

That will no doubt be corrected soon, but I would think that something that strong should be about category 10.5 (maybe we could have a sequel to the earthquake movie....).
LOL, a typo since the winds are about 50, but 505 would sure solve that overdevelopment problem along the shores! (except for our house, of course) :P

jfribrg
2005-Jul-08, 04:09 PM
the winds are about 50

actually they are 150, a very strong category 4

Melusine
2005-Jul-08, 04:41 PM
the winds are about 50

actually they are 150, a very strong category 4

Yeah, it was upgraded to 4, it's sped up a little, it was moving at 12 mph last time I looked.

REPEATING THE 11 AM EDT POSITION...21.4 N... 79.9 W. MOVEMENT
TOWARD...NORTHWEST NEAR 15 MPH. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED
WINDS...150 MPH. MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE... 938 MB.

Edit: I can't type today!

ToSeek
2005-Jul-08, 05:46 PM
Let's hope it misses New Orleans.

Just found a good site that collects a lot of information in one place:

http://www.stormtracker.noaa.gov/

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Jul-08, 06:15 PM
LOL, a typo since the winds are about 50, but 505 would sure solve that overdevelopment problem along the shores! (except for our house, of course)
I thought it was headed for the FL/AL line--they got cleaned out last year.

Meteora
2005-Jul-09, 11:54 PM
Here (http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/index.asp?partner=accuweather) is a summary of Hurricane Dennis.


Hurricane Dennis, a major Category 4 storm with top sustained winds of 505 mph, continues to move northwestward near the south coast of Cuba

That will no doubt be corrected soon, but I would think that something that strong should be about category 10.5 (maybe we could have a sequel to the earthquake movie....).

I'll refrain from making snide comments about our primary competitor here. :)

But this somehow seems a fitting place to mention the bad meteorology in the movie from which I selected my user name. The Unchained Goddess is a late 1950s science education film that stars two scientists and, of course, me. I mean, "Meteora," my namesake. In that film, they show a tornado, and one of the scientists says that the winds in a tornado can reach up to (IIRC) 700 mph. :o

We now believe that tornado wind speeds top out somewhere on the order of 300-350 mph.

John Kierein
2005-Jul-10, 01:42 PM
"IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT F-SCALE WINDS: Do not use F-scale winds literally. These wind speed numbers are estimates and have never been scientifically verified. Different wind speeds may cause similar-looking damage from place to place—even from building to building. Without a thorough engineering analysis of tornado damage in any event, the actual wind speeds needed to cause that damage are unknown. "

from the NOAA tornado page.

Stardate
2005-Jul-10, 09:42 PM
Does anyone know the update? I haven't been watching the news today.

Lord Jubjub
2005-Jul-10, 10:33 PM
Dennis moved ashore between Pensecola and Mobile--within a few miles east of the AL/FL border with high Cat 3 winds at 1455 hours Central Daylight Time.

It is now moving through the heart of Alabama and is forecast to reach St. Louis before curving eastward.

Stardate
2005-Jul-10, 10:44 PM
Dennis moved ashore between Pensecola and Mobile--within a few miles east of the AL/FL border with high Cat 3 winds at 1455 hours Central Daylight Time.

It is now moving through the heart of Alabama and is forecast to reach St. Louis before curving eastward.
Thank you, Lord Jubjub. :D

ngc3314
2005-Jul-10, 11:17 PM
Dennis moved ashore between Pensecola and Mobile--within a few miles east of the AL/FL border with high Cat 3 winds at 1455 hours Central Daylight Time.

It is now moving through the heart of Alabama and is forecast to reach St. Louis before curving eastward.
Thank you, Lord Jubjub. :D

Or for more colorful if anecdotal description - crazed relatives in Fort Walton who stayed put have phone but no power until they get the generator cranked. Equally crazed relatives in Pensacola have neither phone nor power (just like last time, which contributes to my psychological assessment). We, about 150 miles north, are getting wind and rain gathering force and hoping all the trees with substandard roots fell for Ivan. The current path looks as if we'll be (in Tuscaloosa) on the wet side of whatever is left of the center of circulation when it passes in a few hours. People seem to have spread out their panic buying over more time than for Ivan; the stores didn't look so much like refugee camps. today. Just in case, we applied the lessons learned about freezer packing before it became an issue for this one.

Stardate
2005-Jul-10, 11:39 PM
Or for more colorful if anecdotal description - crazed relatives in Fort Walton who stayed put have phone but no power until they get the generator cranked. Equally crazed relatives in Pensacola have neither phone nor power (just like last time, which contributes to my psychological assessment). We, about 150 miles north, are getting wind and rain gathering force and hoping all the trees with substandard roots fell for Ivan. The current path looks as if we'll be (in Tuscaloosa) on the wet side of whatever is left of the center of circulation when it passes in a few hours. People seem to have spread out their panic buying over more time than for Ivan; the stores didn't look so much like refugee camps. today. Just in case, we applied the lessons learned about freezer packing before it became an issue for this one.
You take care! We in 'not touched yet by Hurricane Dennis' sympathize. It's just a matter of time for the effects of Dennis to hit my back yard. :o

ngc3314
2005-Jul-12, 12:15 AM
Or for more colorful if anecdotal description - crazed relatives in Fort Walton who stayed put have phone but no power until they get the generator cranked. Equally crazed relatives in Pensacola have neither phone nor power (just like last time, which contributes to my psychological assessment). We, about 150 miles north, are getting wind and rain gathering force and hoping all the trees with substandard roots fell for Ivan. The current path looks as if we'll be (in Tuscaloosa) on the wet side of whatever is left of the center of circulation when it passes in a few hours. People seem to have spread out their panic buying over more time than for Ivan; the stores didn't look so much like refugee camps. today. Just in case, we applied the lessons learned about freezer packing before it became an issue for this one.
You take care! We in 'not touched yet by Hurricane Dennis' sympathize. It's just a matter of time for the effects of Dennis to hit my back yard. :o


Our foot of earth fared much better last night than with Ivan last fall. There was a funny mottled pattern of power outages (in which we landed, this time, on a bright spot except for a brief outage overnight). Our good fortune may not have been so great for folks farther south, since Dennis came onshore rather more slowly than Ivan and dumped more of its wind and rain closer to the coast. Still, reports I've seen from the coast are not nearly as depressing as for its predecessor. (Our major inconvenience was that cable TV was out until the middle of the afternoon, taking home internet service with it).

So happy to live on a ridge a long way above the nearest possible site of flooding...

Any BABBLERs from Mobile or Pensacola able to report in yet?

George
2005-Jul-12, 02:50 AM
(Our major inconvenience was that cable TV was out until the middle of the afternoon, taking home internet service with it).

So happy to live on a ridge a long way above the nearest possible site of flooding...

Glad to hear the good report.

Meteora
2005-Jul-12, 04:51 AM
"IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT F-SCALE WINDS: Do not use F-scale winds literally. These wind speed numbers are estimates and have never been scientifically verified. Different wind speeds may cause similar-looking damage from place to place—even from building to building. Without a thorough engineering analysis of tornado damage in any event, the actual wind speeds needed to cause that damage are unknown. "

from the NOAA tornado page.

Thta's all true for tornadoes (Fujita scale), but hurricane categories (Saffir-Simpson) are determined the other way. We can actually measure wind speeds in hurricanes, so the category is determined from the wind speed. Tornado wind speeds are estimated from the devastation they leave behind.

Maksutov
2005-Jul-12, 06:48 AM
Here (http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/index.asp?partner=accuweather) is a summary of Hurricane Dennis.


Hurricane Dennis, a major Category 4 storm with top sustained winds of 505 mph, continues to move northwestward near the south coast of Cuba

That will no doubt be corrected soon, but I would think that something that strong should be about category 10.5 (maybe we could have a sequel to the earthquake movie....).

I'll refrain from making snide comments about our primary competitor here. :)

But this somehow seems a fitting place to mention the bad meteorology in the movie from which I selected my user name. The Unchained Goddess is a late 1950s science education film that stars two scientists and, of course, me. I mean, "Meteora," my namesake. In that film, they show a tornado, and one of the scientists says that the winds in a tornado can reach up to (IIRC) 700 mph. :o

We now believe that tornado wind speeds top out somewhere on the order of 300-350 mph.
I'm sure a lot of mobile home residents are relieved to know that.

Taks
2005-Jul-12, 07:05 AM
i moved from melbourne, FL, to colorado springs two and a half years ago... melbourne, if you recall, was where they kept touching down last year. they went over 30 years without a direct hit then BAM! i'm not missing it. last i heard, CO has almost zero catastrophic weather... occasional tornado out in the plains i suppose... phew!

taks

A Thousand Pardons
2005-Jul-12, 07:08 AM
i moved from melbourne, FL, to colorado springs two and a half years ago... melbourne, if you recall, was where they kept touching down last year. they went over 30 years without a direct hit then BAM! i'm not missing it. last i heard, CO has almost zero catastrophic weather... occasional tornado out in the plains i suppose... phew!
Right! in Colorado, they do not consider two feet of snow a catastrophe, it's an opportunity

although...I once watched seven tornodoes, hovering over downtown Denver.

Taks
2005-Jul-12, 07:26 AM
denver, maybe... not in the springs.

and yes, 2 feet of snow means a great day on the slopes. up where i live, at 6800 feet, 2 feet of snow will shovel itself as soon as the sun comes out, even when it's in the teens outside. my theory is that the thin atmosphere means the direct contact of the sun on the surface of the snow dominates the temperature at the snow/air interface, so it is actually much warmer than freezing... of course, i could be full of it :)

at the very least, this is not hurricane related so now that i've mentioned a hurricane, i feel more on topic.

taks

Maksutov
2005-Jul-12, 07:43 AM
denver, maybe... not in the springs.

and yes, 2 feet of snow means a great day on the slopes. up where i live, at 6800 feet, 2 feet of snow will shovel itself as soon as the sun comes out, even when it's in the teens outside. my theory is that the thin atmosphere means the direct contact of the sun on the surface of the snow dominates the temperature at the snow/air interface, so it is actually much warmer than freezing... of course, i could be full of it :)

at the very least, this is not hurricane related so now that i've mentioned a hurricane, i feel more on topic.

taks
In the Springs instead of hurricanes and tornadoes, you get those downslope windstorms that fall off the eastern slope of the Rockies. They can be pretty impressive especially if you're flying through one.

Then if you like to see snow melt, there's always the Chinook. :D


[edit/typo]

Taks
2005-Jul-12, 07:47 AM
i never have flown into the springs in anything other than a 737 piloted by someone else. it is usually wretched, and sleeping or drunk is the easiest way to handle it.

taks