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ToSeek
2005-Jul-18, 04:01 PM
The Biggest Starquake Ever (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/050718_star_quake.html)


The biggest starquake ever recorded resulted in oscillations in the X-ray emission from the shaking neutron star. Astronomers hope these oscillations will crack the mystery of what neutron stars are made of.

On December 27, 2004, several satellites and telescopes from around the world detected an explosion on the surface of SGR 1806-20, a neutron star 50,000 light years away. The resulting flash of energy -- which lasted only a tenth of a second -- released more energy than the Sun emits in 150,000 years.

publiusr
2005-Jul-20, 09:31 PM
And if you look real close, you can see Chuck Heston and George Kennedy running for it.

:oops:

Launch window
2005-Sep-22, 12:57 PM
21 Sep 2005
Double Star and Cluster observe first evidence of crustal cracking
On 27 December 2004, radiation from the biggest starquake on a neutron star ever recorded reached Earth
http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=37944
SGR 1806-20 is located at around 50 000 light-years from Earth on the far side of our Milky Way galaxy, in the direction of the Sagittarius constellation (Image 3). A similar blast within 10 light years would have destroyed the ozone layer and be similar to a major nuclear blast. Fortunately, the closest known magnetar is 13 000 light years away.

Maddad
2005-Sep-22, 07:13 PM
It radiated as much energy in 0.2 seconds as our sun does in a quarter million years! Ouch!

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0595167489/ref%3Dnosim/scifan3-20/002-4749123-3898454
Robert L. Forward wrote a book entitled Starquake, the sequel to "Dragon's Egg". Bother were heavy in physics and science; a little light in character development. The civiliazation in the book lives on the surface of a neutron star. 67 Billion gravities, and a magnetic field strong enough to stretch an atomic nucleus into a cigar shape. Makes you want to sign up for your next vacation. Not!

peteshimmon
2005-Sep-23, 05:54 PM
Few points. Some folk in the world may have
been pointing their camcorders in the
direction where the thing flashed. It was in
the daytime sky so its more likely. Secondly
it kept putting out energy for 30 seconds
I believe so some folk in locations just over
the horizon in twilight might have seen
high altitude flashing if atoms high up were
being ionised. Pity no reports came in!