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PhantomWolf
2005-Jul-19, 12:25 AM
Okay this was tried a little time ago and I think Jay asked a question no-one could answer so it died. But being one to beat a dead horse....

Okay rules. Answer the previous question (preferably with a link) and if it is called correct by the OP of the question, or seconded as correct by one of our resident Apollo nuts (Jay and Bob) then you post the next question and so on. Okay?

To start the ball rolling.

On leaving the moon each mission jetisoned various parts of their suit and keep other parts for historical purposes. Which of the parts that Apollo 11 returned with did Buzz later say he wished they hadn't saved, and what was the part of the suit he wishes they had brought back instead?

ajv
2005-Jul-20, 12:42 AM
Which of the parts that Apollo 11 returned with did Buzz later say he wished they hadn't saved, and what was the part of the suit he wishes they had brought back instead?

From ALSJ, Apollo 11 EVA Preparations (http://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a11/a11.evaprep.html), 108:32:40
[Aldrin - (To Neil) "I think we should have brought the boots back and not the LEVAs. It was a last minute decision and they're not as publicly appreciated as the boots are."]

PhantomWolf
2005-Jul-20, 01:47 AM
[Aldrin - (To Neil) "I think we should have brought the boots back and not the LEVAs. It was a last minute decision and they're not as publicly appreciated as the boots are."]

Correct. They returned with the Lunar Extravehicular Visor Assembly rather then their boots. I guess us silly public apparently appreciate things that touched the surface more than bits that didn't, duh! The balls all your's ajv.

Samara
2005-Jul-20, 03:08 AM
Next Question: How many different experiments at how many different sites did the apollo missions perform?

Glom
2005-Jul-26, 04:36 PM
Yeah, good luck! Response hasn't been overwhelming during previous attempts.


How many different experiments at how many different sites did the apollo missions perform?

A bit vague. Lunar surface experiments I take it. Does this include geological and photographic experiments?

Let's see:

11: PSE
SWC
LRR
12: PSE
CPLEE
SIDE
LSM
SWC
14: PSE
ASE
HFE
SIDE
CCIG
PSMAnd some others. What do I win?

PhantomWolf
2005-Jul-27, 02:02 AM
What do I win?

The right to ask the next question?

Glom
2005-Jul-27, 01:48 PM
Okay, even though I only answered the question for the pre-J missions.

Who were on the Apollo 11 backup crew?

Bob B.
2005-Jul-27, 02:05 PM
Who were on the Apollo 11 backup crew?
Lovell, Anders, and Haise.

Glom
2005-Jul-27, 02:46 PM
Correct. They gave the erroneous implication in the Ron Howard movie that the exact Apollo 13 crew was the Apollo 11 backup.

Bob B.
2005-Jul-27, 03:31 PM
I guess that means it's my turn.

What is the name of the flight controller who saved the Apollo 12 mission with the obscure command "Try SCE to Aux"?

Hamlet
2005-Jul-27, 03:35 PM
I guess that means it's my turn.

What is the name of the flight controller who saved the Apollo 12 mission with the obscure command "Try SCE to Aux"?

That would be John Aaron (http://www.apollostory.com/voices/a5.htm).

Bob B.
2005-Jul-27, 05:38 PM
That would be John Aaron (http://www.apollostory.com/voices/a5.htm).
Correct; your turn.

Hamlet
2005-Jul-27, 07:21 PM
My turn.

What problem developed during Apollo 15's journey to the Moon that, for a short period, seemed to jeopardize the mission?

AGN Fuel
2005-Jul-27, 11:58 PM
My turn.

What problem developed during Apollo 15's journey to the Moon that, for a short period, seemed to jeopardize the mission?

A faulty switch that threatened to light up the SPS.



Edited to note from the A15 Flight Journal:


[After the flight, analysis of the Delta-V Thrust A switch found a piece of wire, 1.4 mm in length trapped between the rectangular metal body of the switch and a plastic liner which is pressed into the body. The central terminal of the switch passes through the body within a flange which extends from the body in a small cylinder. This cylinder forms a small cavity with a 1 mm space between the terminal post and the flange. Evidence of arcing within this space satisfied the engineers that the wire, floating within this cavity, had been the cause of the short.]

Hamlet
2005-Jul-28, 01:39 AM
My turn.

What problem developed during Apollo 15's journey to the Moon that, for a short period, seemed to jeopardize the mission?

A faulty switch that threatened to light up the SPS.



Edited to note from the A15 Flight Journal:


[After the flight, analysis of the Delta-V Thrust A switch found a piece of wire, 1.4 mm in length trapped between the rectangular metal body of the switch and a plastic liner which is pressed into the body. The central terminal of the switch passes through the body within a flange which extends from the body in a small cylinder. This cylinder forms a small cavity with a 1 mm space between the terminal post and the flange. Evidence of arcing within this space satisfied the engineers that the wire, floating within this cavity, had been the cause of the short.]


Correct. Next.

AGN Fuel
2005-Jul-28, 02:22 AM
What promise made to John Young while he was on the moon was kept, even though it took 23 years?

Peter B
2005-Jul-28, 04:12 AM
What promise made to John Young while he was on the moon was kept, even though it took 23 years?

I'll guess it's something to do with a can of beer, Australian, chilled, as a result of a conversation between Young and John Saxon from Honeysuckle Creek. :-)

From the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal:

139:43:46 Young: Roger. We'd sure like to come down there and see you folks after it's over, too.

139:43:51 Saxon: Well, you've got a permanent invite, any time you like.

139:44:00 Young: That's very kind.

139:44:03 Saxon: We'll keep the beer cool for you.

AGN Fuel
2005-Jul-28, 05:43 AM
That's good enough for me, Ethel & the chickens!

John Saxon was finally able to give John Young his chilled beer at the 25th Anniversary of Apollo 11 celebrations.

The event was captured here (http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/alsj/a16/a16swan1.jpg) and here (http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/alsj/a16/a16swan2.jpg).

You're up, Peter B!

Peter B
2005-Jul-28, 06:15 AM
What relationship does controversial Italian journalist Oriana Fallaci have with Apollo?

ajv
2005-Jul-28, 06:30 AM
What relationship does controversial Italian journalist Oriana Fallaci have with Apollo?
Conrad's bet about his first words on the surface.

Peter B
2005-Jul-28, 06:45 AM
Well that didn't take long! I suppose better a question too easy than one too hard.

For those who don't know, Fallaci was convinced that NASA scripted the astronauts' lines, particularly Armstrong's first words on the Moon. In an interview with Apollo 12 Command Pete Conrad she reiterated her claim. Conrad bet her $500 that his first words on the Moon would be, "That might have been a small step for Neil, but it was a big one for me." On the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal, Conrad claimed Fallaci never paid up.

Over to you, ajv.

ajv
2005-Jul-28, 07:05 AM
Ok, this might be a hard one.

During Apollo 17, what was Cernan interested in getting the ground to check for Evans when he suggested that they run an unusual test in the Command Module simulator?

Peter B
2005-Jul-29, 03:07 AM
In the absence of anyone else answering this, I'll give it a go.

Was it Cernan joking with Mission Control about Ron Evans losing his pair of scissors, and suggesting they send someone to the Command Module simulator to have a look there?

ajv
2005-Jul-29, 03:37 AM
Correct.

Prior to the landing, Ron Evans had lost his pair of scissors which were needed to open the sealed plastic food bags. After some joking about his predicament, Cernan and Schmitt agreed to leave a pair behind when they left for the surface. After they returned, the ground asked whether Evans had found his scissors. From the ALSJ - ()s added by Eric.

212:10:xx Evans: [...] I still haven't the slightest idea where the scissors are.
212:10:xx Cernan: Gordo, you might have someone hide them (a pair of scissors) in the CSM (mock-up) and send a backup crew down to the Cape and see how long it takes them to find them.
212:10:xx Fullerton: Okay, I'll get an airplane scheduled up right away.

It's back to you, Peter.

Peter B
2005-Jul-29, 05:38 AM
Who was the last Apollo Capcom to fly in space?

(Ooh! My 1000th post!)

Kiwi
2005-Jul-29, 12:48 PM
212:10:xx Evans: [...] I still haven't the slightest idea where the scissors are.
212:10:xx Cernan: Gordo, you might have someone hide them (a pair of scissors) in the CSM (mock-up) and send a backup crew down to the Cape and see how long it takes them to find them.
212:10:xx Fullerton: Okay, I'll get an airplane scheduled up right away.

C'mon, you guys! That one definitely belongs in the jokes thread. Plus all those others you know of and have never bothered posting there. I'm ashamed that you lot too could be almost as po-faced as the HBs who think it was inappropriate for the astronauts to crack jokes. (Ducks, places arms over head, cringes and runs like h**l.) :)


Who was the last Apollo Capcom to fly in space?

Won't try to answer that one, but it does bring to mind something that thrills me. To have heard so many times, "Neil, we can see you coming down the ladder now," and eventually seeing the speaker cruising away from the shuttle alone in space and being the subject of those wonderful photos. And Tony England joking with the Apollo 16 astronauts and later taking a shuttle flight. Plus so many other Capcoms who did such a wonderful, professional job and with such good humour. If they never made it into space they certainly deserved to, in my opinion. Heroes all.

Waarthog
2005-Jul-29, 01:47 PM
Karol Bobko?

Peter B
2005-Jul-31, 11:16 PM
Karol Bobko?

No. According to my information he wasn't an official Capcom.

Though as I answer this I realise now I don't know who were the Capcoms for the flights out and back.

If I may therefore revise my question,

"Who was the last Apollo surface Capcom to get into space?"

Or have I forfeited my rights? (Uh-oh.)

Waarthog
2005-Aug-01, 03:54 PM
I wasn't sure if this was going to make it anyway as he was one of the Capcoms for the Apollo-Soyuz Test project. While not really a trick question, I think I went in a direction you didn't anticipate.

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-02, 12:03 AM
Both Karl Henize (capcom for Apollo 15) and Tony England (capcom for Apollo 16) first flew in space on STS-51F, launched 29th July 1985.

I can't think of any later than those guys. :-s

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-02, 01:10 AM
If I may therefore revise my question,

"Who was the last Apollo surface Capcom to get into space?"

Or have I forfeited my rights? (Uh-oh.)

Given the revised question, I'll say Tony England, who was the EVA Capcom for A-16.

Peter B
2005-Aug-02, 02:48 AM
According to my information, that's correct.

For those interested, I got the names of the Capcoms from the ALSJ, which included brief biographies. Some Capcoms got into space later in Apollo, or in Skylab. But some had to wait for the Shuttle.

Fullerton went on STS-3 in 1982;
Allen went on STS-5 in 1982;
Parker went on STS-9 in 1983;
McCandless went on STS-41B in 1984;

And England went on STS-51B in 1985.

Your turn again, Mr AGN Fuel.

Looks like the Aussies are dominating things (just like the cricket, the swimming and the rugby league).

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-02, 05:28 AM
All righty then - fingers on the buzzers.... this is a 2-parter on pre-flight training:

Which mission's crew conducted (by far) the greatest number of geology field trips during training prior to their flight? How many field trips did they conduct?

And which crew had the fewest number of integrated Crew/Ground simulations prior to their mission? (Total CM, LM & CM/LM).

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-03, 07:24 AM
All righty then - fingers on the buzzers.... this is a 2-parter on pre-flight training:

Which mission's crew conducted (by far) the greatest number of geology field trips during training prior to their flight? How many field trips did they conduct?

And which crew had the fewest number of integrated Crew/Ground simulations prior to their mission? (Total CM, LM & CM/LM).

OK - given that question has attracted such a flood of interest....

New question:

Although this is not strictly an Apollo question, who was the first person to fly in space twice?

scotsman
2005-Aug-03, 07:43 AM
WAG - Gus Grissom?

Valiant Dancer
2005-Aug-03, 07:31 PM
All righty then - fingers on the buzzers.... this is a 2-parter on pre-flight training:

Which mission's crew conducted (by far) the greatest number of geology field trips during training prior to their flight? How many field trips did they conduct?

And which crew had the fewest number of integrated Crew/Ground simulations prior to their mission? (Total CM, LM & CM/LM).

OK - given that question has attracted such a flood of interest....

New question:

Although this is not strictly an Apollo question, who was the first person to fly in space twice?

Joseph A Walker

He did it in 1963 aboard two seperate X-15 flights. (#90 19 July, and #91 23 August)

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-03, 11:16 PM
Joseph A Walker

He did it in 1963 aboard two seperate X-15 flights. (#90 19 July, and #91 23 August)

Valiant Dancer picks the trick. Take it away, my friend!



(BTW for anyone interested: the answers to the earlier questions were Apollo 16 conducted the most geology field trips during training with 18 [the runner up being Apollo 17 with 13].

The fewest crew/ground integrated sims was for Apollo 8 with only 14 - unsurprising given the relatively short training period for the revised mission and no LM sims required. Apollo 7 had the second fewest with 18 - again, no LM sims required. The record for the most was Apollo 16 with 33.)

Valiant Dancer
2005-Aug-04, 01:39 PM
Joseph A Walker

He did it in 1963 aboard two seperate X-15 flights. (#90 19 July, and #91 23 August)

Valiant Dancer picks the trick. Take it away, my friend!



(BTW for anyone interested: the answers to the earlier questions were Apollo 16 conducted the most geology field trips during training with 18 [the runner up being Apollo 17 with 13].

The fewest crew/ground integrated sims was for Apollo 8 with only 14 - unsurprising given the relatively short training period for the revised mission and no LM sims required. Apollo 7 had the second fewest with 18 - again, no LM sims required. The record for the most was Apollo 16 with 33.)

OK. In the same vein, who was the first woman who flew in space twice.

Count Zero
2005-Aug-04, 07:50 PM
OK. In the same vein, who was the first woman who flew in space twice.

Svetlana Savitskaya, who launched on Soyuz T-7 (8/19/82) & T-12 (7/17/84). Both missions were to Salyut 7.

Valiant Dancer
2005-Aug-04, 07:54 PM
OK. In the same vein, who was the first woman who flew in space twice.

Svetlana Savitskaya.

Correct. She flew on 19 August, 1982 and again on 17 July, 1984 beating Sally Ride to the mark by almost 3 months. She also performed the first EVA by a woman.

Your turn to pose the question.

Count Zero
2005-Aug-04, 08:04 PM
Still off of the Apollo subject:

How many women have flown on Soyuz?

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-04, 11:59 PM
Still off of the Apollo subject:

How many women have flown on Soyuz?

I'll say 4:

Svetlana Savitskaya on T-7 and T-12
Helen Sharman on TM-12
Elena Kondakova on TM-20
Claudie Haignere on TM-33


(I'm sure I've missed someone...)

Count Zero
2005-Aug-05, 12:12 AM
I'll say 4:

Svetlana Savitskaya on T-7 and T-12
Helen Sharman on TM-12
Elena Kondakova on TM-20
Claudie Haignere on TM-33

(I'm sure I've missed someone...)

Those are the only ones I could find. I'm only slightly curious whether they observed the Cosmanaut pre-launch tradition on the way to the pad, or is that just a guy thing?

Anyway, the next question is yours, AGN.

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-05, 12:42 AM
Those are the only ones I could find. I'm only slightly curious whether they observed the Cosmanaut pre-launch tradition on the way to the pad, or is that just a guy thing?

:lol:


OK, back to Apollo...

Which mission's crew were the first to use a planet rather than a star to make an inertial measurement unit alignment? What was the planet?

(This is not a trick question, so I am not including the Earth!)

Valiant Dancer
2005-Aug-05, 03:44 PM
Those are the only ones I could find. I'm only slightly curious whether they observed the Cosmanaut pre-launch tradition on the way to the pad, or is that just a guy thing?

:lol:


OK, back to Apollo...

Which mission's crew were the first to use a planet rather than a star to make an inertial measurement unit alignment? What was the planet?

(This is not a trick question, so I am not including the Earth!)

Apollo 9 used Jupiter.

Next question.

Combines real space travel and pseudoscience.

During Apollo 14, which astronaut conducted an unauthorized pseudoscientific experiment and how did he fare?

Waarthog
2005-Aug-05, 04:36 PM
The answer to your question is Ed Mitchell, and the results were "inconclusive" since they got the times mixed up IIRC. Without confirmation of your victory however, I am of the opinion that your question is premature and therefore I will refrain until I hear from both parties (Valiant Dancer and AGN Fuel) before I proceed.

Valiant Dancer
2005-Aug-05, 04:50 PM
The answer to your question is Ed Mitchell, and the results were "inconclusive" since they got the times mixed up IIRC. Without confirmation of your victory however, I am of the opinion that your question is premature and therefore I will refrain until I hear from both parties (Valiant Dancer and AGN Fuel) before I proceed.

You are correct. So, pending verification by AGN Fuel, you're up. But I'd call inconclusive being generous.

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-07, 11:23 PM
Sorry folks, very busy weekend.

Valiant Dancer was quite correct, so Waarthog, fire away.

Waarthog
2005-Aug-08, 04:34 PM
But I'd call inconclusive being generous.

Hence, it was in quotes.


After Gemini ended, and before being called back for Apollo 7, where did Pad Leader Guenter Wendt work? (Generic answer will suffice)

Waarthog
2005-Aug-09, 04:54 PM
Has no one read The Unbroken Chain by the aforementioned Guenter Wendt?

Arneb
2005-Aug-09, 09:24 PM
Ah, here: (http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-052102a.html9)


He worked instead on test firing anti-tank missiles for McDonnell, while continuing to keep up with the Apollo engineering reports.

Or is it considered cheating in this quiz (my first post) to Google yourself towards the solution? 8-[

Waarthog
2005-Aug-10, 01:18 AM
Quite right. Fire when ready.

Arneb
2005-Aug-10, 06:32 PM
Sorry, late at work - my question is not terribly serious, but then I am not terribly knowledgeable in Apollo affairs.

Which item left on the Moon involves two ties?

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-10, 11:22 PM
Sorry, late at work - my question is not terribly serious, but then I am not terribly knowledgeable in Apollo affairs.

Which item left on the Moon involves two ties?

From memory, the picture of his family left by Charlie Duke at the Descarte Highlands showed both Charlie and his son wearing ties.


(Edited: Found it (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/apollo/frame/?AS16-117-18841). A Hi-Res image can be seen at the Project Apollo Archive site - AS16-117-18841)

Arneb
2005-Aug-11, 05:45 AM
=D> =D> =D>

I knew it wouldn't take long. I asked a similar question over at the ultimate astronomy quiz, and that took about six times as long and needed severel hints - But this is the world centre of Apollonics. :D

Over to you, AGN Fuel.

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-11, 06:45 AM
Alrighty - fingers on buzzers, because this one will go fast.... in fact, we'll make it a 3-parter to make it just a little bit more challenging:

1. One mission had a significantly longer S-II burn than any other. Which mission?

2. Why was the burn longer?

3. What was the duration of the burn in seconds and by how much did it beat 'second place'?

Count Zero
2005-Aug-11, 09:09 AM
I can answer the first two, but that third one is just plain evil! :evil:

Bob B.
2005-Aug-11, 12:32 PM
1. One mission had a significantly longer S-II burn than any other. Which mission?

2. Why was the burn longer?

3. What was the duration of the burn in seconds and by how much did it beat 'second place'?
1. Apollo 13.
2. The center engine cut off was premature.
3. 426.64 seconds, beating Apollo 17 by 31.58 seconds.

See here for source (http://history.nasa.gov/SP-4029/Apollo_18-20_Ascent_Data.htm)

Donnie B.
2005-Aug-11, 01:40 PM
Doggone it. I've been saving up a good question, but I can never seem to get an answer (and thereby the right to ask it). I knew the "two ties" one, too! #-o

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-12, 12:01 AM
Correct, Bob B! You're up.

(Hang in there Donnie B! :wink: )

Bob B.
2005-Aug-12, 12:40 AM
What were the names of the US Navy prime recovery ships for each mission from Apollo 7 through 17?

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-12, 01:15 AM
What were the names of the US Navy prime recovery ships for each mission from Apollo 7 through 17?

Apollo 7 - USS Essex
Apollo 8 - USS Yorktown
Apollo 9 - USS Guadalcanal
Apollo 10 - USS Princeton
Apollo 11 - USS Hornet
Apollo 12 - USS Hornet
Apollo 13 - USS Iwo Jima
Apollo 14 - USS New Orleans
Apollo 15 - USS Okinawa
Apollo 16 - USS Ticonderoga
Apollo 17 - USS Ticonderoga

Bob B.
2005-Aug-12, 01:55 AM
That was too easy. Back to you, AGN Fuel.

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-12, 04:18 AM
That was too easy. Back to you, AGN Fuel.

If I may, I will defer to Donnie B. (Saves me thinking up another question, anyhoo!).

Take it away, Donnie B.

Donnie B.
2005-Aug-12, 01:53 PM
Well, I feel a little guilty since I didn't actually get an answer...

Okay, not that guilty. 8)

This is a 3-parter, or maybe a 5-parter depending on how you look at it:

1) Name the engine component that the Rocketdyne engineers modified in their attempts to fix the combustion instability problem in the F-1 engine (Saturn V first stage engines).

2) Name at least three ways that they changed the design of that component.

3) Describe the technique they used to test these fixes.

Donnie B.
2005-Aug-13, 10:37 PM
Yikes, don't tell me I stumped you guys! Jay, come on, I know you know this one... :)

Obviousman
2005-Aug-14, 12:02 AM
I'm not an engineer but I think I read about this:



1) Name the engine component that the Rocketdyne engineers modified in their attempts to fix the combustion instability problem in the F-1 engine (Saturn V first stage engines).


The injector design



2) Name at least three ways that they changed the design of that component.


Increased the diameter of the injector, the angle at which it mixed with the oxidiser, and used gold to weld it on.



3) Describe the technique they used to test these fixes.

They threw bombs in the combustion chamber to disrupt the flow!!!!!!

Hamlet
2005-Aug-14, 12:03 AM
Well, I feel a little guilty since I didn't actually get an answer...

Okay, not that guilty. 8)

This is a 3-parter, or maybe a 5-parter depending on how you look at it:

1) Name the engine component that the Rocketdyne engineers modified in their attempts to fix the combustion instability problem in the F-1 engine (Saturn V first stage engines).

2) Name at least three ways that they changed the design of that component.

3) Describe the technique they used to test these fixes.

This is a good question! I hesitated to answer this since I could only remember 2 modifications they made. Perhaps someone else can fill in the blanks.

1) IIRC, the engine component was the injector plate at the top of the combustion chamber.

2) One modification was to drill different patterns of holes in the plate. Another modification was to change the angle of the fuel and oxidizer ports so that the jets would impinge on each other at different places within the chamber. Sorry, I can't remember the other modifications.

3) The technique they used was to explode small bombs inside the combustion chamber to induce instability. They could then measue how well their modifications worked by how quickly the instabilities were damped.

Donnie B.
2005-Aug-14, 12:42 AM
Wow, two quick responses. Nice work!

Now I have to pick a winner. Obviousman, you squeaked in first but I question a couple of your answers; while Hamlet only mentioned two of the tweaks. Neither of you mentioned the addition of, and fiddling with the design of, baffle plates. (I was thinking of orifice size, impingement angle, and baffles.)

Obviousman, you mentioned changing the diameter of the injector [plate] and using gold to weld it on; I'm not aware that either of these was done. [Edited to add:] Maybe by "injector" you meant "orifice" instead of "injector plate". If so, then you only need to justify the gold-weld answer.

Hamlet, your answer is more detailed and matches my understanding better, but you didn't quite meet the 3-tweak standard.

How about this: if Obviousman can supply a reference for the two answers I questioned, then he's the winner; otherwise I suggest he pass the torch to Hamlet.

Obviousman
2005-Aug-14, 02:09 AM
Give it to Hamlet anyway. I just remembered reading about the F-1 whereas Hamlet probably understands it!

Hamlet
2005-Aug-14, 04:49 PM
Thanks for the nod, Obviousman!

I liked Donnie B.'s question and so this one also involves issues of instability. It's a two-parter.

1) What is the name given to the longitudinal oscillations that had the potential to damage a Saturn V?

2) Name a method that was used to counter this phenomenon. (There were a number of solutions tried, you just have to name one.)

Count Zero
2005-Aug-14, 07:02 PM
1) What is the name given to the longitudinal oscillations that had the potential to damage a Saturn V?

"Pogo"


2) Name a method that was used to counter this phenomenon. (There were a number of solutions tried, you just have to name one.)

Surge absorbers in the outboard F-1 fuel lines (1st stage).
Early center-engine cut-off (2nd stage).

Hamlet
2005-Aug-14, 08:42 PM
Kudos to Count Zero. You're next.

Count Zero
2005-Aug-14, 10:23 PM
All right, here's an easy one: How many wheels are on the moon?

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-14, 11:29 PM
14?

Count Zero
2005-Aug-15, 01:26 AM
That's what I've got. 4 on each of three rovers, plus two on Apollo 14's tool cart. Back to you.

ajv
2005-Aug-15, 01:42 AM
That's what I've got. 4 on each of three rovers, plus two on Apollo 14's tool cart. Back to you.
What about the Lunokhods?

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-15, 02:17 AM
That's what I've got. 4 on each of three rovers, plus two on Apollo 14's tool cart. Back to you.
What about the Lunokhods?

Being an Apollo quiz, the Lunokhods don't count....?? :oops: #-o

Count Zero
2005-Aug-15, 03:34 AM
That's what I've got. 4 on each of three rovers, plus two on Apollo 14's tool cart. Back to you.
What about the Lunokhods?

Being an Apollo quiz, the Lunokhods don't count....?? :oops: #-o

Uuuhhh, yeah, right. What he said. :oops: #-o 8-[
Now you know what question you can ask, when you get a chance!

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-20, 02:28 AM
So whose got the next question?

Count Zero
2005-Aug-20, 05:31 AM
So whose got the next question?

Sorry! I perhaps wasn't clear. It's back to AGN Fuel.
(but only if he explains his alias - just kidding!)

Count Zero (a William Gibson reference)

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-22, 12:04 AM
So whose got the next question?

Sorry! I perhaps wasn't clear. It's back to AGN Fuel.
(but only if he explains his alias - just kidding!)

Count Zero (a William Gibson reference)

Oh - I thought that ajv had very effectively demolished my answer! Oh well, for completeness, there were the 14 Apollo wheels and 16 (2x8) Lunokhod wheels.

OK - here goes: How many Saturn V's were launched from Pad 39B?

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-22, 02:11 AM
How many Saturn V's were launched from Pad 39B?

Two. Apollo 6 which was the last unmanned test flight for the Saturn V and Apollo 10 which was the only Manned Saturn V Flight to launch from 39B.

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-22, 03:00 AM
How many Saturn V's were launched from Pad 39B?

Two. Apollo 6 which was the last unmanned test flight for the Saturn V and Apollo 10 which was the only Manned Saturn V Flight to launch from 39B.

Oooooh - Close, but no cigar. Re-check your sources (you picked the trick in the question though). :wink:

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-22, 03:23 AM
How many Saturn V's were launched from Pad 39B?

Two. Apollo 6 which was the last unmanned test flight for the Saturn V and Apollo 10 which was the only Manned Saturn V Flight to launch from 39B.

Oooooh - Close, but no cigar. Re-check your sources (you picked the trick in the question though). :wink:

Well if 4 was launched from B as well then it'd be three, but the only references I could find to it's launch was just the 39 complex, it didn't mention A or B. All the manned Apollo flights other than 10 were launched from A though, as was the Skylab Saturn V.

edited to add Apollo 4 was launched from Pad A too. That means from the details I can find the Saturn V's were as follows.

Apollo 4: first test launch - Pad LC39A
Apollo 6: last unmanned test - Pad LC39B
Apollo 7: first manned flight - Pad LC34
Apollo 8: First Cislunar Flyby - Pad LC39A
Apollo 9: Earth Orbit Test of LM - Pad LC39A
Apollo 10: lunar orbit test of LM - Pad LC39B
Apollo 11: first landing - Pad LC39A
Apollo 12: Pad LC39A
Apollo 13: Pad LC39A
Apollo 14: Pad LC39A
Apollo 15: Pad LC39A
Apollo 16: Pad LC39A
Apollo 17: Final Apollo mission launch - Pad LC39A
Skylab: Skylab's launch - Pad LC39A

The Apollo-Suyuz and at least Skylab 3 used LC39B but they had a Saturn 1B launch vehicles

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-22, 03:28 AM
How many Saturn V's were launched from Pad 39B?

Two. Apollo 6 which was the last unmanned test flight for the Saturn V and Apollo 10 which was the only Manned Saturn V Flight to launch from 39B.

Oooooh - Close, but no cigar. Re-check your sources (you picked the trick in the question though). :wink:

Well if 4 was launched from B as well then it'd be three, but the only references I could find to it's launch was just the 39 complex, it didn't mention A or B. All the manned Apollo flights other than 10 were launched from A though, as was the Skylab Saturn V.

Nope - Apollo 4 was launched from 39-A. One of your answers is correct - the other is not.

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-22, 03:52 AM
Okay rechecked a few different places, and 6 was launched from A too according to most, so that'd make just the one Apollo 10

launches link (http://www.nasm.si.edu/collections/imagery/apollo/apollolaunches.htm)

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-22, 03:58 AM
Okay rechecked a few different places, and 6 was launched from A too according to most, so that'd make just the one Apollo 10

launches link (http://www.nasm.si.edu/collections/imagery/apollo/apollolaunches.htm)

Correct! Take it away.

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-22, 06:42 AM
Okay another triple banger.

The Name Apollo.

a) Who come up with it?
b) Where did they get it from/what inspired them?
c) On what date was the name formally announced?

Pip
2005-Aug-22, 07:01 AM
Those are the only ones I could find. I'm only slightly curious whether they observed the Cosmanaut pre-launch tradition on the way to the pad, or is that just a guy thing?

Anyway, the next question is yours, AGN.

If you don't mind me asking, what tradition is that?

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-22, 07:32 AM
Those are the only ones I could find. I'm only slightly curious whether they observed the Cosmanaut pre-launch tradition on the way to the pad, or is that just a guy thing?

Anyway, the next question is yours, AGN.

If you don't mind me asking, what tradition is that?


On the way to the pad for the launch....


.....and marked another cosmonaut tradition that legend says began with Yuri Gagarin in 1961 when he answered a "call of nature," urinating on the bus' wheel. Repeating the action today is seen as a token of good luck.

Nicolas
2005-Aug-22, 02:05 PM
Okay another triple banger.

The Name Apollo.

a) Who come up with it?
b) Where did they get it from/what inspired them?
c) On what date was the name formally announced?

Abe Silverstein; an illustration of the God Apollo riding in his chariot towards the sun was seen as resembling the huge scale of the program + Apollo is also the God of progress and prophecy + previous missions were also named after greek mythology; 30 january 1960.

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-22, 03:40 PM
If you can give me a reference to the date I'll give you it, otherwise the date I have is different.

Nicolas
2005-Aug-23, 03:40 PM
Ah. I think I know why we have different dates:

30 jan. Silverstein came up with the name in a discussion with other leading Moon Program people.

On the 25th of july 1960, the name "Apollo" was officialy approved.
On the 28th of July, the Apollo program was announced to the public and industry.

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-23, 04:30 PM
And since we were after the offical announcement date, July 28th 1960 has it. Hopefully all those HBs out there lurking will note that this was prior to Kennedy's speach to Congress in '61 or the nation in '62. NASA had figured that if fully funded, they could get to the moon by 1970 all the way back in 1959. Kennedy's "challenge" was based on NASA's own figures.

anyways, enough of that, you are go for next question, Nicolas.

Nicolas
2005-Aug-23, 06:03 PM
OK not too hard, but a nice one anyway:

Currently, the tagline of the Apollo 13 mission is "Failure is not an option". Of course, this was not the original and official tagline of Apollo 13.

What is the official tagline of Apollo 13 as featured on the mission patch? Who came up with this tagline?
How many astronomical objects (planets, stars, comets, moons etc) are there on the patch? Which ones?

Four times fun! :)

Oh and for the record: Yes Google hit#1 on "apollo 13 patch" does give all the answers :roll: :D

Astronot
2005-Aug-23, 07:24 PM
"Ex Luna, Scientia," Lovel, Sun, Earth and Moon

Nicolas
2005-Aug-23, 08:01 PM
Assuming you meant "Lovell" and do know how many objects sun, earth and moon are, you've got it! :D

I was inspired by the question because I am wearing my A13 T-shirt right now :).

Up to you, Astronot!

Astronot
2005-Aug-23, 08:28 PM
Thanks Nicolas, for the generous reading.

The deflector that shielded the decent stage of the LM from the hot gasses of the RCS thrusters were not on all the crewed LMs. Which was the first LM to have them and where was that spacecraft when the deflectors were installed?

DataCable
2005-Aug-24, 05:17 AM
Which was the first LM to have them and where was that spacecraft when the deflectors were installed?
LM-5 (Apollo 11's) was the first to have RCS Plume Deflectors, and they were installed while the LM was inside the SLA atop the Saturn V stack, on the launch pad. (a very much last-minute addition)

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-24, 08:46 AM
Sneaks in for the 100th post and sneeks out again while Datacable waits on the correct to ask his question. ;)

Kiwi
2005-Aug-24, 09:11 AM
The deflector that shielded the decent stage of the LM from the hot gasses of the RCS thrusters were not on all the crewed LMs...

In all the drawings and photos of seen of the different lunar modules -- probably hundreds -- I've never seen that appropriate, becoming, chaste, courteous, modest, nice, polite, proper, pure, respectable, seemly, thoughtful stage.

Can someone please point it out to me? I'm only aware of the deSCent and aSCent stages.

Astronot
2005-Aug-24, 11:52 AM
Correct, on to you DataCable.

Kiwi, I wonít dissent from your able corrections, once again you have helped me be more accurate. Thank you. A good editor is just as important as the writer in the final product.

DataCable
2005-Aug-24, 12:30 PM
OK, probably rather "slow-pitch" for this crowd:

The LRV's speedometer tops out at what value?

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-24, 12:55 PM
20 km/h

DataCable
2005-Aug-24, 07:01 PM
Yup. Only struck me because of the recent... err... "discussion" with MrGuitarDeath over on IMDb, in which he accusingly questioned why a vehicle with a (rated) top speed of 8 MPH would have a speedometer which goes up to 20 MPH... and I don't believe anyone (myself included) ever called him on the units.

All yours, Wolferz.

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-25, 02:12 AM
I almost was going to go with 20mph, but since I knew they used km as a measurement on the surface I thought I should check. ;)

Okay, easy question. :)

What was the total number of animals to appear on all of the Apollo Patches? What were they and which missions did each appear on?

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-25, 02:24 AM
Okay, easy question. :)

What was the total number of animals to appear on all of the Apollo Patches? What were they and which missions did each appear on?


Hmmm - a little tricky, depending on your definitions. I'll go with 9 animals, being:

Apollo 11 - Eagle
Apollo 13 - 3 horses
Apollo 15 - 3 birds. I'm sure that I read somewhere that the very stylised 'swooshes' on the A-15 emblem were meant to depict birds.
Apollo 16 - Eagle
Apollo 17 - A stylised Eagle.

You also get a god on the A-17 badge.

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-25, 02:40 AM
Well I did say it was easy. ;)

link to patch images (http://www.nasm.si.edu/collections/imagery/apollo/apollopatches.htm)

link to patch descriptions. (http://history.nasa.gov/SP-4029/Apollo_18-18_Mission_Insignias.htm)


All yours, AGN Fuel

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-25, 03:12 AM
All yours, AGN Fuel


OK - it is a little known fact that there have actually been two men go to the moon who were not born in the United States (don't tell the conspiracy guys, OK???!).

Who would they be?

Bender
2005-Aug-25, 05:49 AM
If my memory serves me right, and it probably doesn't, Mike Collins was born in Puerto Rico, and Bill Anders was born in Hong Kong.

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-25, 07:07 AM
If my memory serves me right, and it probably doesn't, Mike Collins was born in Puerto Rico, and Bill Anders was born in Hong Kong.

3.5 out of 4 is close enough (Mike Collins was born in Rome).

Fire away, Bender.

Bender
2005-Aug-25, 08:20 AM
If my memory serves me right, and it probably doesn't, Mike Collins was born in Puerto Rico, and Bill Anders was born in Hong Kong.

3.5 out of 4 is close enough (Mike Collins was born in Rome).

Fire away, Bender.

Argghhh! I hate it when I do that! Collins lived in Puerta Rico as a youth, born in Rome. Senior moment! :lol: :lol:

Pete Conrad made a bet with a journalist about what his first wors would be as he stepped on the Moon. Who was the bet made with, how much was it for, and did he ever collect?

EvilBob
2005-Aug-25, 08:23 AM
The journalist was Oriana Fallaci, for $500. Conrad said he was never able to collect on it.

Bender
2005-Aug-25, 09:03 AM
Well done, EvilBob! :D :D :D :D

You have the helm.

EvilBob
2005-Aug-25, 09:06 AM
I'm supposed to be learning Cisco at this moment, but it's pretty dull, so here goes. Probably an easy one, for this crowd.
During Apollo 16, John Young damaged an experiment. What was the experiment, how did he damage it, and how was it fixed?

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-25, 03:21 PM
I'm supposed to be learning Cisco at this moment, but it's pretty dull, so here goes. Probably an easy one, for this crowd.
During Apollo 16, John Young damaged an experiment. What was the experiment, how did he damage it, and how was it fixed?

Well the only one I have found so far was the Heat Flow Experiment which Young damaged when his boot accidently caught and broke one of the cables from its connector. However it doesn't seem to fit the question because everything I've found on it indicted that while they had a look at the cable and tried to figure out a solution they couldn't fix it and the experiment was abandoned.

EvilBob
2005-Aug-25, 11:03 PM
Correct on all three counts!
It was a trick question - the guy who's experiment it was (can't remember the name) worked out a possible way of fixing it, but it was deemed to be too time-consuming to do with no guarantee that the fix would work. So it was never fixed.
=D>
Your turn!

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-26, 08:58 AM
Well sticking with problems and fixes. There were two problems that occured on the pad during the countdown for Apollo 11. What were they and how were they fixed?

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-28, 09:42 AM
Have I actually manged to stump the class?

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-29, 12:06 AM
Have I actually manged to stump the class?

I know that there were two minor issues arise when the astronauts were en route to the pad - there was a signal light fault and a leaking valve, both of which were rapidly fixed without any major drama.

Are they the problems you were referring to?

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-29, 01:55 AM
Well the signal light was a little eariler and it wasn't a light fault, but a comunications one, fixed by moving the comunications equipment on the pad. The leak in the hydrogen replenishment system was indeed while the crew was boarding and was fixed by tightening a number of bolts which bypassed the leaking valve.

Close enough for me though, so take it way AGN_Fuel.

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-29, 02:48 AM
OK - This one should go fast......

Why were the Apollo 12 crew particularly appropriate to complete a mission landing where they did?

Bob B.
2005-Aug-29, 03:41 AM
Why were the Apollo 12 crew particularly appropriate to complete a mission landing where they did?
Apollo 12 had an all navy crew and they landed in the Ocean of Storms.

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-29, 07:07 AM
Why were the Apollo 12 crew particularly appropriate to complete a mission landing where they did?
Apollo 12 had an all navy crew and they landed in the Ocean of Storms.

Correct! Fire away, Bob.

Bob B.
2005-Aug-29, 12:39 PM
You probably all remember the scene from the movie Apollo 13 in which a group of engineers devise a makeshift solution to adapt the command moduleís lithium hydroxide canisters for use in the lunar module. In the movie they never give the name of the man who led the engineering team. What was the name of the real-life person who played the leading role in solving the lithium hydroxide canister problem on Apollo 13?

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-29, 11:51 PM
You probably all remember the scene from the movie Apollo 13 in which a group of engineers devise a makeshift solution to adapt the command moduleís lithium hydroxide canisters for use in the lunar module. In the movie they never give the name of the man who led the engineering team. What was the name of the real-life person who played the leading role in solving the lithium hydroxide canister problem on Apollo 13?


It was Ed Smylie, whose team was deservedly acknowledged recently (http://www.iee.org/OnComms/Circuit/benefits/Editorials/News&Views/Apollo13.cfm) for their efforts.

Bob B.
2005-Aug-30, 01:54 AM
It was Ed Smylie, whose team was deservedly acknowledged recently (http://www.iee.org/OnComms/Circuit/benefits/Editorials/News&Views/Apollo13.cfm) for their efforts.
That's correct. Back to you, AGN Fuel.

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-30, 04:56 AM
It was Ed Smylie, whose team was deservedly acknowledged recently (http://www.iee.org/OnComms/Circuit/benefits/Editorials/News&Views/Apollo13.cfm) for their efforts.
That's correct. Back to you, AGN Fuel.

OK then. The Apollo missions included records for the high velocities attained, including the A-10 crew holding the distinction for having achieved the highest velocity ever attained by human beings.

However, one specific function according to the operations manual had specified nominal velocity of only '4-7 MPH'. What was that function?

EvilBob
2005-Aug-30, 06:45 AM
At a guess, I would say the crawler-transporter taking the Saturn V out to the pad...

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-30, 07:20 AM
At a guess, I would say the crawler-transporter taking the Saturn V out to the pad...

Nice guess, but No. :D

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-30, 07:21 AM
I'd suggest the docking speed for the CSM and the LM

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-30, 07:24 AM
I'd suggest the docking speed for the CSM and the LM

Another nice try, but nope.

Alasdhair
2005-Aug-30, 07:55 AM
Something as simple as walking on the moon?

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-30, 10:40 AM
Something as simple as walking on the moon?


No, but you're very much on the right track.

The nominal velocity of 4-7 MPH was provided in a very specific operations manual, not one that was used for all of the Apollo missions.

Heid the Ba'
2005-Aug-30, 11:11 AM
Moon buggy?

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-30, 12:00 PM
Moon buggy?

No, but one more guess should nail it!

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-30, 12:25 PM
The moon cart used on 14?

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-30, 12:39 PM
The moon cart used on 14?

The MET - that's the one. NASA didn't leave anything unquantified, huh?

Hard to believe, but the MET Operations Manual actually specified a "Nominal pulling speed" of 4-7 MPH! :lol:

Fire away, PW.

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-30, 01:06 PM
The MET - that's the one. NASA didn't leave anything unquantified, huh?

Hard to believe, but the MET Operations Manual actually specified a "Nominal pulling speed" of 4-7 MPH! :lol:

Fire away, PW.

Ooooookay. You know they put a lot of un-needed details in this hoax, lol.

Okay, easy one. How many astronaunts have flown at least one Gemini, Apollo and Space Shuttle mission and who were they?

Bob B.
2005-Aug-30, 01:13 PM
Okay, easy one. How many astronaunts have flown at least one Gemini, Apollo and Space Shuttle mission and who were they?
Only one, John Young.

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-30, 01:33 PM
Only one, John Young.
Dang, is 7 mins a new record?

All yours Bob B.

Bob B.
2005-Aug-30, 01:50 PM
Dang, is 7 mins a new record?
One of my questions got answered in only 4 minutes. :(

Earlier AFN Fuel asked a question about the all-Navy crew of Apollo 12. Keeping with that theme, I'd like to know (1) what was the only Apollo flight with an all US Air Force crew, and (2) what was the only Apollo flight with a crew from three different branches of the US military?

Astronot
2005-Aug-30, 03:05 PM
Apollo 15 had an all Air Force Crew
Apollo 7 had
Walter M. Schirra Navy
Walter Cunningham Marines
Donn F. Eisele Air Force

Bob B.
2005-Aug-30, 03:12 PM
Apollo 15 had an all Air Force Crew
Apollo 7 had
Walter M. Schirra Navy
Walter Cunningham Marines
Donn F. Eisele Air Force
Yep, good job. Your turn, Astronot.

Astronot
2005-Aug-30, 03:34 PM
As long as we are talking about services, one Apollo astronaut served in the Air National Guard of two states. Who was he and which states did he fly for?

Waarthog
2005-Aug-30, 04:52 PM
what was the only Apollo flight with an all US Air Force crew
Trick Question: there were 2

one Apollo astronaut served in the Air National Guard of two states. Who was he and which states did he fly for?
John Swigert. Apollo 13 Massachusetts Air National Guard from September 1957 to March 1960 and Connecticut Air National Guard from April 1960 to October 1965

Bob B.
2005-Aug-30, 05:12 PM
what was the only Apollo flight with an all US Air Force crew
Trick Question: there were 2
The only other flight I think you could be referring to is Apollo 9. James McDivitt and David Scott were both active Air Force, however Russell Schweikart was retired from the Air Force and was a civilian at the time of the mission. Schweikart served in the USAF and Air National Guard 1956-63 before becoming an astronaut.

Astronot
2005-Aug-30, 05:19 PM
Correct Waarthog, your turn.

Waarthog
2005-Aug-30, 05:41 PM
Russell Schweikart was retired from the Air Force and was a civilian at the time
I knew I should have put a smiley after trick question. 8-[



Since Bob decided to be picky :P :D
Who is the only Apollo astronaut to have never been in the military?

ToSeek
2005-Aug-30, 05:52 PM
Who is the only Apollo astronaut to have never been in the military?

Geologist Harrison "Jack" Schmitt.

Bob B.
2005-Aug-30, 05:52 PM
Who is the only Apollo astronaut to have never been in the military?
Harrison "Jack" Schmitt

EDIT: Darn, I was ToSeeked by a few seconds!

JayUtah
2005-Aug-30, 06:27 PM
Schmitt attended Air Force flight school -- not as a cadet, of course. While he has never been a member of the military, he has undergone training intended only for military personnel.

Waarthog
2005-Aug-30, 07:50 PM
ToSeek is ToRight
Bob B. is ToLate

ToSeek
2005-Aug-30, 08:22 PM
Okay, this is going to be another easy one, though I'll try to complicate it a bit:

So far as I know, up until well into the shuttle era there were only two missions in the history of the American space program that flew with all-experienced crews. Between these two missions:

A. Name the mission and the astronauts where none of the crew members ever flew in space again.
B. Name the mission and the astronauts where each of the crew members went on to command a later mission. (Bonus points for naming the later missions.)

(For an extra bonus, track down the very few shuttle missions with all-experienced crews.)

Bob B.
2005-Aug-30, 08:45 PM
A. Name the mission and the astronauts where none of the crew members ever flew in space again.

Apollo 11 - Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Buzz Aldrin all had prior Gemini experience and none ever flew again after their Apollo 11 mission.


B. Name the mission and the astronauts where each of the crew members went on to command a later mission. (Bonus points for naming the later missions.)

Apollo 10 - Thomas Stafford, John Young and Gene Cernan all had prior Gemini experience. Stafford went on to command the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, Young commanded Apollo 16, STS-1 & STS-9, and Cernan commanded Apollo 17.

ToSeek
2005-Aug-30, 09:51 PM
15 out of 10 (includes five bonus points), Bob. Your go.

Bob B.
2005-Aug-30, 10:23 PM
What addition was made to the crew diet for the Apollo 16 mission, what was the reason for the addition, and what unpleasant physiological side effect did it cause?

Peter B
2005-Aug-31, 01:03 AM
What addition was made to the crew diet for the Apollo 16 mission, what was the reason for the addition, and what unpleasant physiological side effect did it cause?

The crew were given potassium-fortified orange juice to drink.

It was because Jim Irwin's extreme exertions on Apollo 15 led to heart irregularities.

The OJ gave at least John Young somewhat of a wind and acid problem, which everyone got to hear about because of an accidentally keyed microphone.

Bob B.
2005-Aug-31, 03:41 AM
Correct on all points, Peter B. You're up.

Peter B
2005-Aug-31, 06:16 AM
One of the questions asked by Hoax Believers is, "Why are there no stars in the Apollo photographs?" The simple answer is because the stars are too faint to show up.

But in what way is the question itself wrong?

(Hoping the question isn't too obscure...)

PhantomWolf
2005-Aug-31, 07:26 AM
How about because the sun appears in a number of Apollo photographs and the sun is a star so thus a star does appear in the photos.

Peter B
2005-Aug-31, 07:39 AM
LOL! Good answer, but not what I was looking for. Think of it in terms of the word "stars," if that's any help.

EvilBob
2005-Aug-31, 09:14 AM
A bit of a stab in the dark but....
Mercury and Gemini are both references to astronomical objects / constellations, as well as Gods. Apollo is not the name of an astronomical object, and therefore should have no stars?
8-[

Nicolas
2005-Aug-31, 01:10 PM
While the astronauts were on the moon, all the famous stars of their time were on earth. Many of them in Hollywood, Bel Air... etc. Anyway the average size of a star lying down is less than 2*1m, which is far less than the resolution of earth photographs taken from the moon. Furthermore, no stars ever did visit the moon. Toss those 2 toegether and one can conclude that it was impossible for stars to be seen on the Apollo photographs.

And besides, the astronauts were on the moon to do science (...), and not to take pictures and ask autographs of stars!!

Bender
2005-Aug-31, 06:00 PM
How about they landed during the daytime? Look outside in mid morning. How many stars do you see? :lol: :lol:

kittyhawk
2005-Aug-31, 06:23 PM
A. Name the mission and the astronauts where none of the crew members ever flew in space again.

Apollo 11 - Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Buzz Aldrin all had prior Gemini experience and none ever flew again after their Apollo 11 mission.


also, i don't think the members of the apollo 7 crew ever flew in space again. they were:

wally schirra
walter cunningham
don eisele

ToSeek
2005-Aug-31, 07:00 PM
A. Name the mission and the astronauts where none of the crew members ever flew in space again.

Apollo 11 - Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Buzz Aldrin all had prior Gemini experience and none ever flew again after their Apollo 11 mission.


also, i don't think the members of the apollo 7 crew ever flew in space again. they were:

wally schirra
walter cunningham
don eisele

There were several Apollo crews that never flew again. In addition to 7, no one on 13, 14, 15, or 17 ever went into space again, though Fred Haise (13) did fly some of the shuttle approach and landing tests.

Anla'Shok
2005-Aug-31, 07:06 PM
In ToSeek's original question it was stated

"So far as I know, up until well into the shuttle era there were only two missions in the history of the American space program that flew with all-experienced crews. Between these two missions"

Bob B.
2005-Aug-31, 08:30 PM
A. Name the mission and the astronauts where none of the crew members ever flew in space again.

Apollo 11 - Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Buzz Aldrin all had prior Gemini experience and none ever flew again after their Apollo 11 mission.

also, i don't think the members of the apollo 7 crew ever flew in space again. they were:

wally schirra
walter cunningham
don eisele
There was actually a first part to the question that was not quoted when I gave the answer. The question was, which Apollo crew consisted of members who all had previous spaceflight experience and who never flew again after completing their mission. Only one crew meets these criteria, the crew of Apollo 11.

Peter B
2005-Aug-31, 10:51 PM
Folks

Obviously my question is a bit too obscure, so I'll have another go at asking it.

The question "Why are there no stars in any Apollo photographs?" is wrong. Which experiment on which mission produced results which demonstrates this?

AGN Fuel
2005-Aug-31, 11:39 PM
Folks

Obviously my question is a bit too obscure, so I'll have another go at asking it.

The question "Why are there no stars in any Apollo photographs?" is wrong. Which experiment on which mission produced results which demonstrates this?

Oh - are you referring to the UV Photography done by the Apollo 16 crew?

Peter B
2005-Aug-31, 11:41 PM
Folks

Obviously my question is a bit too obscure, so I'll have another go at asking it.

The question "Why are there no stars in any Apollo photographs?" is wrong. Which experiment on which mission produced results which demonstrates this?

Oh - are you referring to the UV Photography done by the Apollo 16 crew?

*ping!*

Well done, sir.

Back to AGN Fuel.

AGN Fuel
2005-Sep-01, 12:29 AM
OK - there was a thread recently about the astronauts (gasp) actually enjoying themselves whilst on the moon.

In the same vein, I am thinking about four "sports" that various astronauts engaged in while on the moon. What would those sports be, and who did them?

Peter B
2005-Sep-01, 12:49 AM
OK - there was a thread recently about the astronauts (gasp) actually enjoying themselves whilst on the moon.

In the same vein, I am thinking about four "sports" that various astronauts engaged in while on the moon. What would those sports be, and who did them?

1. Alan Shepherd - golf;
2. Ed Mitchell - javelin;
3. Jack Schmitt - hammer throw;

Hmm. Not sure about the fourth. I'll guess:

4. Alan Bean - discus.

AGN Fuel
2005-Sep-01, 12:54 AM
OK - there was a thread recently about the astronauts (gasp) actually enjoying themselves whilst on the moon.

In the same vein, I am thinking about four "sports" that various astronauts engaged in while on the moon. What would those sports be, and who did them?

1. Alan Shepherd - golf;
2. Ed Mitchell - javelin;
3. Jack Schmitt - hammer throw;

Hmm. Not sure about the fourth. I'll guess:

4. Alan Bean - discus.

Correct on the first three. One to go... :wink:

Peter B
2005-Sep-01, 01:00 AM
4. John Young - high jump.

AGN Fuel
2005-Sep-01, 01:10 AM
4. John Young - high jump.


:lol: Inventive, but no.

Personally I don't regard this last activity as a sport (golf either for that matter - any activity where John Daly is near the peak of the profession is no sport in my book. Wasn't it Ambrose Bierce who described golf as 'A good walk, ruined'? But I digress...).

However, details of it appear in the Sports pages of the paper, so there you go.

Bob B.
2005-Sep-01, 01:28 AM
4. John Young - Grand Prix


Edit: If I'm right, let Peter B take the next turn since he got the first three.

AGN Fuel
2005-Sep-01, 01:43 AM
4. John Young - Grand Prix


Edit: If I'm right, let Peter B take the next turn since he got the first three.

That's the one I was thinking of - and given your gracious deferral to Peter B, it is that esteemed gentleman who is up next.

Peter B
2005-Sep-01, 02:40 AM
Bob B

That's very generous of you.


AGN Fuel

I was about to suggest "Dave Scott - discus" so it might have been a while before I twigged to the Grand Prix.

Okay, this one's a bit different. It's in the style of a cryptic crossword clue:

John Young thinks it's very satisfactory that the cacti cope. (9)

ajv
2005-Sep-01, 03:18 AM
John Young thinks it's very satisfactory that the cacti cope. (9)
copacetic

Peter B
2005-Sep-01, 03:26 AM
Correct. Your turn ajv.

Out of interest, did people think it was hard?

AGN Fuel
2005-Sep-01, 03:26 AM
John Young thinks it's very satisfactory that the cacti cope. (9)
copacetic

Wasn't that Charlie Duke?


Edited: yes, here it is. (http://history.nasa.gov/ap16fj/02earth_orbit.htm) GET 000 52 17.

Young must have used the word as well somewhere.

Peter B
2005-Sep-01, 04:15 AM
I'm quite sure John used the term as well.

(I hope I'm not wrong!)

ajv
2005-Sep-01, 10:45 AM
I'm quite sure John used the term as well.
Actually, I was going to ask you when Young used it. Duke says it a few times on 16 (and once as Apollo 11 Capcom) and Bean uses it but I couldn't find a reference to John Young saying it.

ajv
2005-Sep-01, 12:05 PM
A joke from the online transcripts.

What should a geologist do after examining the concrete outside Pete Conrad's garage?

Astronot
2005-Sep-01, 12:57 PM
Go to the beach at Galveston.

ajv
2005-Sep-01, 06:08 PM
Correct. The reference is from Apollo 12, starting at 084:06:09. After Conrad compares the colors of some Lunar features to his concrete driveway and wet beach sand, Weitz responds
084:10:31 Weitz: Okay. We had a team of geologists checking your driveway. We'll send them to Galveston now.

Astronot, you are go!

Astronot
2005-Sep-01, 06:30 PM
Which Apollo astronaut subsequently became an executive with a professional football team (American football). What was the team. Hint: The teamís home stadium is currently a refugee camp.

Bob B.
2005-Sep-01, 07:07 PM
Which Apollo astronaut subsequently became an executive with a professional football team (American football). What was the team. Hint: The teamís home stadium is currently a refugee camp.
Dick Gordon became an executive with the New Orleans Saints.

Astronot
2005-Sep-01, 07:22 PM
Touchdown, Bob!

Bob B.
2005-Sep-01, 07:31 PM
On a typical mission the S-IVB stage performed two burns. On which Apollo mission(s) did the S-IVB perform a number of burns other than two, how many burns did it perform, and why?

Glom
2005-Sep-01, 07:40 PM
On a typical mission the S-IVB stage performed two burns. On which Apollo mission(s) did the S-IVB perform a number of burns other than two, how many burns did it perform, and why?

Does it have anything to do with Apollo 9 as a testing thing?

Other than that, my first thought would be an orbit change but I know that the APS usually did it.

I'm going to guess Apollo 13 for the collision trajectory.

Bob B.
2005-Sep-01, 07:51 PM
Does it have anything to do with Apollo 9 as a testing thing?.
I think it is too soon to start giving hints. Somebody here will probably know the answer. :P


I'm going to guess Apollo 13 for the collision trajectory.
No, it was not Apollo 13.


Edited to clean up format.

Alasdhair
2005-Sep-01, 09:19 PM
Did it just need the one burn on Apollo 7?

Glom
2005-Sep-01, 09:23 PM
Did it just need the one burn on Apollo 7?

I think you are right. I somehow misread the question as which missions was there more than two burns without realising that one burn was also a candidate. Yes, in that case, Apollo 7 and Apollo 9 for because they only went into Earth orbit so there was no TLI. I could also mention morbidly Apollo 1 in which there were no burns.

Donnie B.
2005-Sep-01, 09:52 PM
Did it just need the one burn on Apollo 7?

I think you are right. I somehow misread the question as which missions was there more than two burns without realising that one burn was also a candidate. Yes, in that case, Apollo 7 and Apollo 9 for because they only went into Earth orbit so there was no TLI. I could also mention morbidly Apollo 1 in which there were no burns.
Yes there were. :cry:

Bob B.
2005-Sep-01, 09:56 PM
Did it just need the one burn on Apollo 7?

I think you are right. I somehow misread the question as which missions was there more than two burns without realising that one burn was also a candidate. Yes, in that case, Apollo 7 and Apollo 9 for because they only went into Earth orbit so there was no TLI. I could also mention morbidly Apollo 1 in which there were no burns.
You've got part of the answer but you're not home yet.

Apollo 7 is correct. It required only one burn of the S-IVB to put the CSM into orbit.

You are incorrect about Apollo 9, though I can't tell you what's wrong about it or I'll give the answer away.

By the way, I'm not including Apollo 1 or any of the unmanned tests. Limit your answer to Apollo 7 through 17.

Glom
2005-Sep-01, 10:12 PM
I just checked the post-MOR. There were two S-IVB burns of S-IVB504 after EOI to put it into an escape orbit as well as to verify S-IVB restart capability, which is listed in the secondary objectives (I don't know why because they already did it for real on Apollo 8).

So, is the answer Apollo 7 because there was only one S-IVB burn and Apollo 9 because there were 3?

Ooh ooh, does Skylab 1 count since there were no S-IVB burns because the S-IVB had no propellent or working engine because it was actually a space station?

Bob B.
2005-Sep-01, 11:22 PM
So, is the answer Apollo 7 because there was only one S-IVB burn and Apollo 9 because there were 3?
Correct, this is the answer I was looking for. The S-IVB on Apollo 7 performed a single 470 second burn as the second stage of the Saturn IB placing the CSM in Earth orbit. On Apollo 9 the S-IVB performed a 124 s burn during launch inserting the spacecraft into an approximate 190 km orbit. After LM extraction the S-IVB was restarted and burned for 62 s increasing its apogee to 3,050 km. About 80 minutes later the S-IVB was started for the third time and burned for 242 s until propellant depletion to eject the stage into a solar orbit.

Your turn, Glom.

Glom
2005-Sep-02, 12:04 PM
Okey dokey!

On Apollo 12, where in the geological traverse, did they suspect they might have found Copernican ray material?

Valiant Dancer
2005-Sep-02, 06:19 PM
Okey dokey!

On Apollo 12, where in the geological traverse, did they suspect they might have found Copernican ray material?

At Sharp Crater during EVA 2.

Glom
2005-Sep-02, 10:15 PM
You would be right.

PhantomWolf
2005-Sep-06, 03:14 AM
Bump for Valiant Dancer's question

Donnie B.
2005-Sep-06, 02:07 PM
Has VD (unfortunate initials!) appeared on the new board (or should that be the new-new board) yet?

PhantomWolf
2005-Sep-06, 02:13 PM
Well if he doesn't soon, I'll throw out a new question to get us rolling again.

Valiant Dancer
2005-Sep-06, 03:08 PM
Well if he doesn't soon, I'll throw out a new question to get us rolling again.

Sorry folks, long weekend and no access to a puter.

What part of Apollo 6's operational test flight failed and why?

PhantomWolf
2005-Sep-07, 01:58 AM
Hmmmmm. Apollo 6 had a lot of problems.

The pogo effect cause damage to the rocket on launch.
The second stage lost 2 of its J-2 engines meaning that it didn't achieve the intended orbit height.
The third stage firing had to be longer that intended and so ended it in ellipical orbit rather then a circular one and then the S-IV engines wouldn't restart which caused the abandoning of the stage and the primary test.
As a back up they had to use the SMS to replicate the TLI, because of this they ran out of fuel for the highspeed re-entry and the CM landed 50 miles short of its intended splashdown.

I'm assuming you mean the failure of the S-IV restart due to the longer running of its engines because of the J-2 failures possibly caused by the pogo.

Count Zero
2005-Sep-07, 02:11 AM
Wasn't that also the mission where one of the four adapter panels between the S-IVB and CSM came off during launch, or was that Apollo 4? I forget where I read about it, but some engineers were surprised that the vehicle held together (i.e. that the SLA structure didn't collapse, causing the CSM to hit the launch vehicle). They hadn't designed the SLA for a missing panel contingency.

What an awesome bird...

Valiant Dancer
2005-Sep-08, 03:52 PM
Hmmmmm. Apollo 6 had a lot of problems.

The pogo effect cause damage to the rocket on launch.
The second stage lost 2 of its J-2 engines meaning that it didn't achieve the intended orbit height.
The third stage firing had to be longer that intended and so ended it in ellipical orbit rather then a circular one and then the S-IV engines wouldn't restart which caused the abandoning of the stage and the primary test.
As a back up they had to use the SMS to replicate the TLI, because of this they ran out of fuel for the highspeed re-entry and the CM landed 50 miles short of its intended splashdown.

I'm assuming you mean the failure of the S-IV restart due to the longer running of its engines because of the J-2 failures possibly caused by the pogo.

Yup. Thats why.

Verify operation of Saturn V propulsion, guidance and control, and electrical systems. Was the what mission failed.

You're up.

PhantomWolf
2005-Sep-09, 10:39 AM
Okay we all know that Apollo 17 found orange lunar soil, but one of the other crews found something that was a different unusual colour. What was it, what colour was it, who found it and where did they find it? (and no it wasn't John Young's orange juice. ;))

PhantomWolf
2005-Sep-11, 01:57 AM
Bump to see if we can get an answer

Donnie B.
2005-Sep-11, 04:21 PM
How about a hint? Was it a natural object or something man made?

ottawan
2005-Sep-11, 07:08 PM
Are you talking about Buzz's "purple rock" to the left of the ladder on Apollo 11?

ajv
2005-Sep-11, 09:17 PM
Or the unexpected white layer at Head crater kicked up by Conrad?
Or the discolored bits of Surveyor on 12?
Or Gene's brown "rock"?

Glom
2005-Sep-11, 09:48 PM
Or the unexpected white layer at Head crater kicked up by Conrad?

I thought it was at Sharp? That was the answer given to my similar question a short while back.

ajv
2005-Sep-11, 10:14 PM
I thought it was at Sharp? That was the answer given to my similar question a short while back.
I think there was Copernican ejecta at several sites on their traverse. Conrad kicked up the stuff (in joke) at 132:20:24 but although the journal says "What isn't known is whether the white layer at Head Crater is due to a local impact or to Copernicus" it also mentions that it is dated at 810 million years which is not inappropriate to Copernicus.

PhantomWolf
2005-Sep-12, 02:07 AM
It was something naturally occuring on the moon and it was a colour not usually associated with the moon, so not grey or white.

Couldn't locate anything about a "purple rock" with 11 so the answer there is no. (you got a link though, it sounds interesting.)

And no it was not the packing material that Gene mistook as a brown rock either.

Astronot
2005-Sep-12, 02:16 AM
Apollo 15 found some green glass. IT formed below the surface and was part of the ejecta from a crater. The coloring was caused by magnesium. The samples were clods of very small individual beads.

PhantomWolf
2005-Sep-12, 02:44 AM
That's close enough me. :) Go for it Astronot.

Astronot
2005-Sep-12, 01:30 PM
What ice cream maker created a special flavor to celebrate the first moon walk? What was the name of the flavor?

PhantomWolf
2005-Sep-13, 01:58 AM
Well I found the answer, but since I asked the last question, I'll let someone else answer. ;)

AGN Fuel
2005-Sep-13, 02:12 AM
What ice cream maker created a special flavor to celebrate the first moon walk? What was the name of the flavor?


It was Baskin Robbins and the flavour was 'Lunar Cheesecake'!

Astronot
2005-Sep-13, 02:14 AM
Give the man a cone!

AGN Fuel
2005-Sep-13, 02:48 AM
Alrighty then... this one is a real piece of Apollo trivia!

In the movie, Apollo 13, they showed a playful Fred Haise operating the repress valve in order to startle Lovell. This incident was not fictional - Haise did actually do this during the flight 35 years ago.

Haise also managed to freak Swigert out by imitating the sound of the RCS thrusters (specifically, of the valves opening), when Swigert knew the switches were off and the RCS should not have been firing.

How exactly did Haise do this?



(edited for clarity)

AGN Fuel
2005-Sep-13, 11:51 PM
I know this one is pretty obscure.

Lucky there were technical debriefs after each of the missions.....

AGN Fuel
2005-Sep-14, 11:29 PM
I'll give this one a few more hours, then ask another question. I guess it is too obscure, although the information (cough, cough tech debrief cough) is out there......

Donnie B.
2005-Sep-14, 11:47 PM
Yeah, if I only had a copy of the Mission Reports for A13... :doh:

AGN Fuel
2005-Sep-14, 11:55 PM
Yeah, if I only had a copy of the Mission Reports for A13... :doh:


Ask and ye shall receive (http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/alsj/a13/a13-techdebrief.pdf) (although it's 4.6Mb, so those with dial up might want to not click on this link...)

PhantomWolf
2005-Sep-15, 02:23 AM
I considered rumaging through the pdf, but on dial up they upload slooooooooooooowly.

ajv
2005-Sep-15, 03:36 AM
Lucky there were technical debriefs after each of the missions.....

Haise: The closest I could reproduce the sounds of the thruster was by sticking the pad of Velcro on my foot to the lower bulkhead and then snapping in and out the bulkhead.

AGN Fuel, I think you should ask another one.

AGN Fuel
2005-Sep-15, 03:56 AM
Lucky there were technical debriefs after each of the missions.....

Haise: The closest I could reproduce the sounds of the thruster was by sticking the pad of Velcro on my foot to the lower bulkhead and then snapping in and out the bulkhead.

AGN Fuel, I think you should ask another one.


That's the one!


Haise: The closest I could reproduce the sounds of the thruster was by sticking the pad of Velcro on my foot to the lower bulkhead and then snapping in and out the bulkhead. That kind of made a sound like the thrusters, which upset Jack now and then too.

Swigert: Because I would have the switches off, and I'd say we're not supposed to be firing. What's firing?

Haise: That was my foot firing!


I appreciate the thought ajv, but even with the clue, this was buried pretty deep & would have taken some searching. So, you're up next!

ajv
2005-Sep-15, 11:42 PM
What languages did Al Worden have listed for his Greetings from Endeavour messages?

Astronot
2005-Sep-16, 02:15 AM
Nine languages:

Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Russian, Spanish

ajv
2005-Sep-16, 02:40 AM
Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Russian, Spanish
The paper is reproduced in the flight journal.
http://history.nasa.gov/ap15fj/pics/hello.jpg

Your turn, Astronot.

Astronot
2005-Sep-16, 02:45 AM
The Apollo 17 landed in the valley called Taurus-Littrow on the edge of which Sea?

Superluminal
2005-Sep-16, 03:21 AM
Taurus-Littrow is on the edge of Serinity.

Astronot
2005-Sep-16, 12:09 PM
May peace be with you in pursuit of the next question.

Superluminal
2005-Sep-16, 09:17 PM
On Apollo 14, what experiment was conducted, without Al Shepard's knowledge, by Ed Mitchel?

Peter B
2005-Sep-19, 12:28 AM
A test of ESP. Though I understand it wasn't terribly successful. Because of a delay in the mission, Mitchell conducted his part of the test half an hour after the people on Earth concentrated on receiving his signals.

PhantomWolf
2005-Sep-21, 01:35 PM
Looks right to me. I'd suggest that barring SuperLuminal's stating it's not, that you ask your question to get the ball rolling again, Peter B.

Peter B
2005-Sep-23, 02:08 AM
Sorry about the delay. I was looking for a good question.

Okay, can anyone complete this statement, apparently displayed after the end of the mission?

"The flight of Apollo 10, for..."

Psi-less
2005-Sep-25, 02:03 PM
The Flight of Apollo 10, for Adult Audiences Only."

Psi-less

Peter B
2005-Sep-26, 12:46 AM
Correcta-mundo!

Over to you, Blue Leader.

ottawan
2005-Sep-29, 08:58 PM
Over to you Blue Leader!

Peter B
2005-Sep-30, 03:00 AM
Psi-less

Are you there?

PhantomWolf
2005-Oct-03, 05:58 AM
Oky if Psi-less don't reapear by tomorrow, Peter you can ask a new one, or otherwise I'll throw in a new one to get us going again.

PhantomWolf
2005-Oct-04, 07:44 AM
Well doesn't look like Psi-less is back so to get us rolling again:

According to Neil Armstrong, when he was a boy he had a recuring dream. The dream could be seen as a preminition of his later Apollo missions. What was it?

Donnie B.
2005-Oct-04, 01:27 PM
As a young boy, Neil Armstrong had a recurring dream in which he held his breath and floated high above the people, houses, and cars.I think that would fit the bill, right? :D