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Lorcan Faol
2005-Aug-15, 09:04 AM
Ahoy! It's been a long time since I have posted here last. I've had a busy summer. I haven't done any observing with my telescope in a long time either, unfortunately. I have some friends who really want to come out to my place and have me show them some cool stuff 'up there'. But it hasn't happened yet.

But anyway, tonight I was thinking about some good astronomy and stargazing music. I've never done this before, but I thought it'd be a relaxing and pretty cool experience to have some good music playing in the background while looking through the telescope, or just while laying out and stargazing. Something that sort of enhances the experience, you know? It's also great to just sit out there in silence, but I was thinking this may add an extra dimension to the experience. Especially if you are alone and don't have anyone to talk to. I love music (obsessed, you might say) so I listen to it almost everywhere I can. I am surprised I never thought of mixing it with astronomy until now.

In the hour or so that I've been thinking about this, I've thought that the following albums/artists would be great to listen to in this kind of environment and situation.

*Ulver - Perdition City, Kveldssanger
*Mozart (probably my favorite classical composer... but I think just about any classical music would be great in this situation)
*Those nifty NASA space probe recordings of the interactions of the solar winds with solar system objects
*Godspeed You Black Emperor (any album)
*A Silver Mount Zion (any album)

This is all that I have come up with so far that I'd consider to be extremely awesome for stargazing music.

Surely there is endless amounts of this out there...

Champion_Munch
2005-Aug-15, 09:20 AM
Lately when I've been stargazing by myself, I listen to Velvet revolver or Red hot chili peppers. :)

with regards

MG1962A
2005-Aug-15, 01:45 PM
Plenty of Pink Floyd. In particular....Learn To Fly.

Can't keep my eyes from the circling sky....tongue tied and twisted.....just an earthbound misfit......am I

MG

Astronot
2005-Aug-15, 03:01 PM
My favorite listening while stargazing is almost any work by English renaissance composer of organ and voice music Thomas Tallis. (http://www.classical.net/music/comp.lst/tallis.html)

Argos
2005-Aug-15, 03:23 PM
Electronic music in general (except for the "techno" subspecies) and some classics. Jean-Michel Jarre (Equinox) and Kraftwerk (Radioactivity) are a must. I would also cite the long intro of Pink Floyd´s "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" ["Rememebr when you were young? You shone like the sun... 8) ]

Arneb
2005-Aug-15, 05:37 PM
Actually, the last time I had the opportunity to go star gazing, I listened to the live radio broadcast of the German Football Cup final (Bayern 2, Schalke 1, as always) 8-[

And the time before that I was taught to go carefully - I was glued not only to the eyepiec but also to the radio news for the events unfolding in Rome around the death of John Paul II. And when I was finished at three in the morning on a very cool field, the car battery had died... :evil:

Maybe it is better better not to listen to music at all - at what other time can you actually hear your RA motor make a noise?

The Stars are silent, so I enjoy being silent as well - Although I'll have to think about this Tallis option :)

Normandy6644
2005-Aug-15, 06:27 PM
Joe Satriani.

Gillianren
2005-Aug-15, 08:52 PM
the sound of a bustling after-hours party at the ale house on the ridge, generally. or, this weekend, the sound of set up, on account of doing inventory Saturday night and meteor-gazing Friday, as people showed up at Ren Faire. if it'd been Saturday, we might've had the strains of Heather Alexander as part of that ale house crowd, but she generally hasn't showed up yet on Friday night.

ngc3314
2005-Aug-15, 10:31 PM
My favorite listening while stargazing is almost any work by English renaissance composer of organ and voice music Thomas Tallis. (http://www.classical.net/music/comp.lst/tallis.html)


Ahhh, ahhh, a carbon-based life form after my own heart. I'd add Respighi's Ancient Airs and Dances. (Hands up, all those who knew that oe of thse was composed by Vincenzo Galilei, Galileo's father?). Bach fugues also seem suitably timeless. Beyond that, outdoors observing feels to me more like a time to appreciate the raw night.

In contrast, for "industrial" observing where you gotta keep going all night and there are exposures to finish and standards to measure, as the wee hours wear on, I tend to go for Sousa and Bruckner, and sometimes soe rocking blues.

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Aug-15, 11:27 PM
Pachelbel's Canon. If you can find it arranged for bass, viola, and two violins, you've got it made.

Hale_Bopp
2005-Aug-16, 03:18 AM
How about Astrocappella?

Astrocappella 2.0 (http://www.astrocappella.com/)

They have some mp3s on their wbe site.

Rob

hippietrekx
2005-Aug-16, 03:26 AM
Usually when I get a good view window (I haven't had one in over a MONTH!) I borrow some of my friends' CDs, as I own none myself. I borrowed some heavy metal last time. I couldn't tell you what bands they were, as I pay little attention to music, but they had fast beats.

Once, I borrowed some of my grandma's 80's and 90's electronic/techno music (yes, my grandma liked that music. Odd for a 64 year old, but she was always a little strange. It explins me though...). That was fun, too.

--hipster

Seeker of Knowledge
2005-Aug-16, 04:10 AM
Frank Sinatra. Between "Fly me to the Moon", "All this and Heaven too" and "Stardust" it's all I need for astronomy stuff!

Amphoteric
2005-Aug-16, 06:49 AM
any Pink Floyd or Porcupine Tree album

Sticks
2005-Aug-16, 07:20 AM
If you are outside, why not just listen to the sounds of the local wild life, and see if you can train yourself top recognise their calls. Or just listen to the wind.

Why do you have to fill every possible space with a concophony [-X

If you are in an observatory with no wild life, how about the following

Sprach Zarrar Thustra (sp?) Richard Strauss
On the Blue Danube - Johan Strauss

(And watch out for any rouge bllack slabs emitting high pitch screams :) )

Eroica
2005-Aug-16, 10:30 AM
... I thought it'd be a relaxing and pretty cool experience to have some good music playing in the background while looking through the telescope, or just while laying out and stargazing. Something that sort of enhances the experience ...
Sounds like you're looking for musak, not music. I hate the idea of good music being used a background to enhance some other activity. Is this what Beethoven suffered for? :-({|=

The only "music" one should listen to while stargazing is John Cage's 4'33'' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cage#4.E2.80.B2_33.E2.80.B3)! :D

Maksutov
2005-Aug-16, 11:17 AM
... I thought it'd be a relaxing and pretty cool experience to have some good music playing in the background while looking through the telescope, or just while laying out and stargazing. Something that sort of enhances the experience ...
Sounds like you're looking for musak, not music. I hate the idea of good music being used a background to enhance some other activity. Is this what Beethoven suffered for? :-({|=

The only "music" one should listen to while stargazing is John Cage's 4'33'' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cage#4.E2.80.B2_33.E2.80.B3)! :D
Good point, Eroica.

Often while watching meteor showers or just traveling through the sky via RFT, binoculars, or unaided eyes while doing non-scientific observing just for the pleasure of it, the visual input becomes a background for the aural foreground of Mahler's Ninth, Third, or any of the other symphonies, plus Ives. Works by Bruckner and Ruggles are favorites too.

It's sort of like the wonderful DVD set that I have called "What the Universe Tells Me" (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0001US7HC/103-7263025-4645462?v=glance) that is not only an analysis of Mahler's Third but also a series of visuals with commentary illustrating the thoughts and feelings of various musical and non-musical professionals in relation to the music.

I find the same thing happening while climbing mountains. A break at a magnificent vista above treeline seems to demand the Scherzo of Mahler's Fifth or the Andante Moderato from his Sixth. The view then becomes a background enhancement to the music.

But if you're after Muzak™ to provide the appropriate background to the visuals, then the Pachelbel piece fits that bill to the nth yuppie degree.

Sticks, it's Also sprach Zarathustra, translated to "Thus spoke Zoroaster", Richard Strauss' musical take on Nietzsche's written take on an old Asian religion. Here's what the title page of the score looks like.

http://img52.imageshack.us/img52/888/alsosprachtitlepage0cb.th.jpg (http://img52.imageshack.us/my.php?image=alsosprachtitlepage0cb.jpg)

N C More
2005-Aug-16, 11:23 AM
Wow, Mak, you know your music!

When I'm looking around at the vast "out there" I usually listen to old rock and roll! :oops:

ngc3314
2005-Aug-16, 12:49 PM
It's sort of like the wonderful DVD set that I have called "What the Universe Tells Me" (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0001US7HC/103-7263025-4645462?v=glance) that is not only an analysis of Mahler's Third but also a series of visuals with commentary illustrating the thoughts and feelings of various musical and non-musical professionals in relation to the music.
[/URL]

Mahler knew what he was doing. The vastness of his conception in the Third could be satisfied only by the most extensive and idiomatic trombone solo that I've encountered in the whole classical tradition. It's also nice in that the soloist gets to display the ability to take on the rest of the orchestra and still be heard. I may have to look that DVD up... Such a shame it's not performed all that often. Must be the problems of finding a vocalist for that other movement.

Following up some of the other comments - I wonder how much of a generational tning (in technological infiltration rather than age) we're seeing, in the sense that some people are so accustomed to either the Diskman and clones, or iPod, that the notion of engaging in some activity without one almost does not occur.

Parrothead
2005-Aug-16, 03:24 PM
Depending on mood, dictates music or not. One favourite is Celestials: Flute Concertos by Peeter Vahi and Urmas Sisask. The recording features Maarika Jarvi on flute along with the Tallinn Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Kristjan Jarvi.

edit twice to fix typos

Argos
2005-Aug-16, 03:34 PM
Joe Satriani.

That would make up a terrific soundtrack for a a fiery atmospheric entry of a doomsday impactor. :)

Samara
2005-Aug-16, 10:23 PM
If you are outside, why not just listen to the sounds of the local wild life, and see if you can train yourself top recognise their calls. Or just listen to the wind.

Why do you have to fill every possible space with a concophony [-X

If you are in an observatory with no wild life, how about the following

Sprach Zarrar Thustra (sp?) Richard Strauss
On the Blue Danube - Johan Strauss

(And watch out for any rouge bllack slabs emitting high pitch screams :) )

Not to mention unusually behaving computers...

Me? Coldplay seems a good bet. Especially "speed of sound" and "Clocks"

Oh, and the "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" soundtrack :D

(rest of BB nervously looks around and slowly backs away)

And continuing on the 2001 front, am I the only one to theink the video for "Speed of Sound" looked like the end of 2001?

The Supreme Canuck
2005-Aug-16, 10:32 PM
But if you're after Muzak™ to provide the appropriate background to the visuals, then the Pachelbel piece fits that bill to the nth yuppie degree.

That's the point. Kind of soothing, and it blends in nicely. Nothing to sink your teeth into, though. :)

Sticks
2005-Aug-16, 10:42 PM
In similar vein how about Adagio for Strings (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adagio_for_Strings) by Samuel Barber (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Barber)

Champion_Munch
2005-Aug-16, 11:44 PM
Me? Coldplay seems a good bet. Especially "speed of sound" and "Clocks"

And continuing on the 2001 front, am I the only one to theink the video for "Speed of Sound" looked like the end of 2001?

Wooohooo! Goo Colplay. :D

Never seen the clip for Speed of Sound though.

with regards

Samara
2005-Aug-17, 12:59 AM
Another good bet? The Flaming Lips, Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots

[obsessive fan] These guys are AMAZING!!! It's rare to find an album that has nothing but songs you'd want to listen to - most have at least 3-4 good songs that you just listen to over and over again. But after all, we are talking about THE FLAMING LIPS!!! However, for stargazing you DEFINITELY must listen to "One more Robot" "Yoshimi" and "Do You Realize??" In fact you must stop reading this, go to the nearest record store, and BUY THE ALBUM NOW
[\obsessive fan]

die Nullte
2005-Aug-17, 01:48 AM
... I thought it'd be a relaxing and pretty cool experience to have some good music playing in the background while looking through the telescope, or just while laying out and stargazing. Something that sort of enhances the experience ...
Sounds like you're looking for musak, not music. I hate the idea of good music being used a background to enhance some other activity. Is this what Beethoven suffered for? :-({|=

The only "music" one should listen to while stargazing is John Cage's 4'33'' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cage#4.E2.80.B2_33.E2.80.B3)! :D

Anybody calling himself "Eroica" is alright with me, since that is my absolute favorite musical work. I also enjoy Papageno's posts, because I start hearing Mozart in my head when I read them. However, when I'm observing alone, I usually observe in silence. I'd rather hear the crickets, coyotes and subtle rustlings in the brush. A number of times I've been to large club star parties where somebody was playing, usually quite loudly, new-agey "space music," and I really resent having this noise pollution (as I consider it) inflicted on me. Rock or head-banger music of any stripe would be worse, since I'm a classical fan.

When I was a youngster in the 1950s, my father and I spent a lot of time at Griffith Observatory in L.A. I attended a number of planetarium shows, and now when I hear the Brahms Symphony No. 2, I always think back to its use at "sunrise" in the planetarium shows. Also, the air conditoning system in the planetarium had a deep rumble, and sometimes when I'm under a very dark sky, I imagine the AC is still quietly rumbling in the background.