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stephanie_dukie
2003-Aug-08, 11:02 PM
I am gathering information on binoculars for astronomy. Does anyone use them for this purpose? If so, what are the specs on what you use and where did you get them?

I have a few in mind after gathering information on sky & telescope, but now I would like to hear peoples opinions on what would be a good choice for what I am wanting them for.

I would sooner or later like to venture past planet watching, but for now, that is what I would use them mostly for.

As far as cost: I would want to probably spend no more then about $300.00 - $500.00. I know the more I spend, the better I will get.

Here is what I am looking at to purchase: Fully multi coated optics (prism-Bak-4)
A magnification of at least 11X.... 63mm - 70mm aperture...5-6mm exit pupil size

I would prefer to have binoculars that didnt need a tri-pod, but if the better binoculars would require a tri-pod, I would take that route.

Thanks everyone for all your patience and help

Stephanie

imported_Astrono
2003-Aug-09, 12:13 AM
Hi there Stephanie!
Check out these web addresses on a home made binocular holder.

http://www.islc.net/~mwlesso/astronomirror.htm
http://www.islc.net/~mwlesso//binocularmirror1.jpg
http://www.islc.net/~mwlesso//binocularmirror2.jpg
http://www.islc.net/~mwlesso//binocularmirror3.jpg

I use 10 x 50 Bushnell,8 x 30 Tasco, and 8 x 40 Yashica(best of the 3)

Here is web address of Jim's Mobile Inc. newest version of REVERSE binoculars:
http://www.jimsmobile.com

Fraser
2003-Aug-09, 07:24 AM
If you're spending $300-$500, why not just go for a telescope? Spend $50 on a pair of binoculars, get to know your constellations, and then spring for a telescope. The night sky is beautiful with a pair of binoculars, but 11x will only show you the hint of a disk for Mars, and Jupiter. A $500 telescope will show you much more detail.

skyhog
2003-Aug-13, 10:00 AM
I would recommend the binocular route for a number of reasons. Many compare binoculars to telescopes which is quite frankly an 'apples and oranges' comparison. Its similar to comparing a low power eyepiece to a higher one. The thing to remember when observing the night sky is scale. Some things are better, and indeed, only observable with the unaided eye. Aurora, meteors, the panoramic view of the milky way at a dark site, constellations in their entirety. Binoculars fit very nicely into the next catagory of scale. They permit wide field views of a great many more objects and lend themselves much better to showing many over a telescopic view, the pliads, the moon during an eclipse as examples. I own a pair of 10x50 and 20x80 binos as well as several scopes and find them as integral to the hobby as any telescope. Buying a reasonable pair now won't be a problem as you will join the vast majority of serious observers who have them in thier arsenal.

I'm not one who subscribes to the very expensive high end binos for astro use. I think there is a certain requirement for wildlife or birding where colour correction is vitally important but don't see the huge need astronomically.

On the mounting front binos in the 7-10x bracket can be hand held but any bino always benefits from some kind of mount, even if this is a simple monopod. My 20x80s are useless off a mount!

Eddie.

summerwind#1
2003-Aug-20, 02:38 AM
:rolleyes: I've been looking at Mars with a pair of Zeiss 7x42.
Expensive new but, an audubon society sells them reasonable.
These are usually trade in's

I also have a pair of Swift bins. 8x42.
They can be purchased at a reasonable price.
Check out a Comp. in Pa. They deal maily in Astronomy scopes.
I'll check out the name if it will help and if I can do that on this site.
I'm very new at this so, I'm hardly qualified to give info.
But , I'm doing fine with both of my bins.
Good luck.

I'm an avid birder this is why I have the Zeiss.
I can tell you I saved $400.00 with this Pa. comp.
Summerwind

summerwind#1
2003-Aug-20, 03:07 AM
:rolleyes: I've been looking at Mars with a pair of Zeiss 7x42.
Expensive new but, an audubon society sells them reasonable.
These are usually trade in's

I also have a pair of Swift bins. 8x42.
They can be purchased at a reasonable price.
Check out a Comp. in Pa. They deal maily in Astronomy scopes.
I'll check out the name if it will help and if I can do that on this site.
I'm very new at this so, I'm hardly qualified to give info.
But , I'm doing fine with both of my bins.
Good luck.

I'm an avid birder this is why I have the Zeiss.
I can tell you I saved $400.00 with this Pa. comp.
Summerwind

Planetwatcher
2003-Aug-20, 06:42 PM
I aggree with Frasier, for $300-$500 buy a telescope. Don't spend more then $50-$100 for binoculars, because you can only get so far with them, and that's it.

Don Sevendy
2003-Aug-22, 12:49 AM
If you go the binocular route, anything over 50 to 60 mm will need a mount, but a photographic tripod will not do the job for any object more or less overhead. Specialty mounts are available, but these will cost $200+. Still, binoculars are more versatile than astronomical telescopes, and therefore are less likely to be gathering dust in six months.

I personally like the idea of 20x80 binoculars, but be warned that anything less than $250 or so are likely to have undersized prisms, and should be more properly be spec'ed as 20x72 (or so). Still, all that glass is impressive.

Locke
2003-Aug-22, 06:12 AM
I think that 300$ is enough for a telescope but don't go out past 100$ for binoculars...

Locke

imported_Astrono
2003-Aug-24, 01:21 AM
Here is a nice information on binocular choices at this web address in the UK.

http://www.astromag.co.uk/binocs.html

Good Luck!

:D